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Full text of "School of Dentistry Catalog 1988-1996"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/schooldent88unse 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF 
DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 
1988-1990 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




The University of Maryland is accredited by 
the Middle states Association ofi olleges and 
Secondary Schools and is a manlier oj the 
Association of American Universities The 
Dental School is accredited by the .( ommis 
sion on Accreditation of Dental and Dental 
Auxiliary Educational Programs of the 
Coum il on Dental Education of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association 

The i niversity of Maryland has been elec- 
ted tn membership in the Assot union of Amer- 
ican I 'nh ersities This assot iation, founded 
in 1900 is an organization of those univer- 
sities in the I nited states and ( anada gener 
ally < onsideredto be preeminent in the fields 
q) graduate and professional study and 
research 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND DENTAL SCHOOL 

STRATEGIC PLAN FOR 

ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT 



The University of Maryland Dental School seeks highly qualified students with 
backgrounds in diverse disciplines. 

The major criterion for admission is strong scholastic achievement in undergraduate 
school. 

The educational goal of the Dental School is to graduate a professional who is a self- 
directed, lifelong learner capable of identifying and solving problems through critical 
and scientific thought. 



To realize these goals, new admissions criteria have been established to permit 
applicants more flexibility in choosing an undergraduate major. Non-science majors and 
individuals who are contemplating a change in career direction are encouraged to apply. 
First consideration will be given to applicants who have undertaken a challenging 
baccalaureate program in the major of their choice. 

The minimum acceptable science background is one year each of chemistry and 
biology, including laboratory. Applicants who present with the minimum science 
requirements must show evidence of better than average performance in these courses. 
We reserve the right to recommend or require additional courses if necessary to improve 
an applicant's preparation for dental school. Conversely, requirements may be waived in 
exceptional cases when an applicant's background supplants the need for such courses. 

The admission decision will be based upon performance in previous academic 
programs, the quality of those programs, and personal factors, as evidenced by letters of 
recommendation, extracurricular activities and a personal interview. The Dental 
Admissions Test will be used as an adjunct to the applicant's educational credentials 
rather than as an independent determinant of admissibility. 

Although the Dental School supports a coherent four year program of 
undergraduate education for most students, it recognizes that some individuals may be 
prepared to enter after three years. It is possible to qualify for a bachelor's degree in 
absentia following completion of the first year of dental school if planning is begun early 
in the undergraduate program. Arrangements of this type are under the aegis of the 
undergraduate institution, which grants the baccalaureate degree. 



DENTAL SCHOOL 
BULLETIN 
1988-1990 



"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to be 
administered, and no less important, human relation- 
ships developed between teachers and students and 
between students and patients. If ever patients are 
regarded as clinical material, this building will have 
been degraded and its use corrupted. We must never 
forget that the word patient comes from the Latin root 
which means to suffer. Clinical material does not suf- 
fer. Human beings do." 

From the address of Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 
Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Regents 
I 'niversity of Maryland 
Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall 
March 5, 1971 



Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 

University of Maryland 



THE PIONEER OF DENTAL 




EDUCATION 



Founded in 1840 by Drs. 
Hay den and Harris to pro- 
vide formal training in 
dentistry, the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery was 
the first dental school in the 
world. It has served as a pro- 
totype in dental education, 
with equal emphasis on 
sound medical knowledge 
and development of clinical 
skills. 

The schools Center for the 
Study of Human Perfor- 
mance in Dentistry con- 
tinues this tradition of 
innovation. In addition to 




the DDS, the school offers 
advanced specialty educa- 
tion, graduate study, and 
both baccalaureate and 
master s programs for dental 
hygienists. 





Emilie Foeking was the 
first woman to graduate 
from the school, in 1873. 
Today nearly half of the 
schools students are 
women. 



The Dental School was 
located at the corner of 
Lombard and Greene 
Streets, adjacent to the 
University of Maryland 
Hospital, before Hayden 
Harris Hall was com- 
pleted in 1970. 



CONTENTS 




THE PIONEER OF 
DENTAL EDUCATION 

This is the official sesquicentennia] 
emblem for the first dental school in 
the world. Like the emblem of dentis- 
try from which it is derived, this de- 
sign uses a serpent entwined about 
an ancient Arabian cautery in the 
manner of the single serpent of 
Aesculapius, the Greek god of med- 
icine. The serpent is anchored about 
the Greek letter delta, for dentistry, 
which is intertwined with a circle 
representing all members of the oral 
health care team In the foreground is 
a shield bearing the standard of the 
Maryland state flag. 



General Information 

Philosophy 
The School 
The Campus 
The Cits' 



The Dental Program 


5 


Application Admission 


5 


Academic Policies and Programs 


7 


Requirements for Graduation 


9 


Employment Opportunities in 




Dentistry 


9 


The Dental Curriculum 


10 


Departments Programs 


10 


Dental Hygiene Programs 


18 


General Information 


18 


Preprofessional/Professional 




Baccalaureate Program 


18 


Two- and Three-Year 




Professional Curricula 


19 


Degree Completion 




Baccalaureate Program 


22 


Master of Science Program 


24 


Advanced Education 




Programs 


26 


Graduate Education 


26 


Advanced Dental Education 




Programs 


26 


Professional Development 


26 


Student Life 


27 


Student Services 


2~ 


Student Policies 


28 


Publications/Organizations 




Awards 


31 


Matriculation Policies and 




Procedures 


33 


Registration Procedures 


33 


Determination of In-State Status 


33 


1988-89 Projected Tuition 




and Fees 


3-4 


Student Expenses 


35 


Official University Records 


36 


Student Health Requirements 


36 



Financial Resources 

University Grants 
Endowment and Loan Funds 



37 

37 

3~ 



Administration and Faculty 39 

Dental School 39 
University of Maryland at 

Baltimore 16 

University of Maryland 46 



Alumni Association 


47 


Policy Statements 


48 


Maps 


50 



Academic Calendar 



52 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



PHILOSOPHY 

Since its origin in 18-jO. the dental pro- 
fession has exhibited a commitment to 
innovation. Continual refinement in 
clinical procedures has been augmented 
by an improved understanding of human 
biology. With the synthesis of these 
elements, the profession has been able 
to improve and expand its deliver}' of 
services. Populations previously un- 
served— the handicapped, medically 
compromised, hospitalized — not only 
are being treated but also are benefit- 
ting, as is the population at large, from 
improved materials and technology. 

The Dental Schools programs focus 
on the three basic aims of the academic 
community — teaching, research and ser- 
vice. As a university discipline, dental 
education must meet and surpass its 
previous accomplishments to ensure the 
continued advancement of dentistry. 
While the process of education must re- 
main anchored firmly to time-tested 
principles, it must also continually ex- 
tend itself to uncover hidden truths 
within these same principles and 
thereby contribute to man's progress to- 
ward better understanding and control 
of his environment. 

THE SCHOOL 

History 

The Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Dental School, University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore has the distinction of 
being the first dental college in the 
world. Formal education to prepare stu- 
dents for the practice of dentistry origi- 
nated in 1840 with the establishment of 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 
The chartering of the school by the Gen- 
eral Assembly of Maryland on February 
1, 1840 represented the culmination of 
the efforts of Dr. Horace H. Hayden and 
Dr. Chapin A. Harris, two dental practi- 
tioners who recognized the need for 
systematic formal education as the foun- 
dation for a scientific and serviceable 




dental profession. Together they played a 
major role in establishing and promoting 
formal dental education, and in the de- 
velopment of dentistry as a profession. 

Convinced that support for a formal 
course in dental education would not 
come from within medical schools, Dr. 
Hayden undertook the establishment of 
an independent dental college. Dr. 
Harris, an energetic and ambitious young 
man who had come to Baltimore in 1830 
to study under Dr. Hayden, joined his 
mentor in the effort to found the 
college. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery served as a prototype for dental 
schools gradually established in other 
American cities and originated the pat- 
tern of modern dental education, with 
equal emphasis on sound knowledge of 
general medicine and development of 
the skills of dentistry. Through its contri- 
butions to dental and medical progress 
and through the prominent role of its 
faculty and graduates in the develop- 
ment of the profession, the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery has exerted a 
remarkable influence on professional 
dentistry. 



The present dental school evolved 
through a series of consolidations involv- 
ing the Maryland Dental College, which 
merged with the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery in 1878; the Dental De- 
partment of the University of Maryland, 
founded in 1882; and the Dental Depart- 
ment of the Baltimore Medical College, 
which merged with the University of 
Maryland Dental Department in 1913- 
The final consolidation took place in 
1923, when the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery and the University of 
Maryland Dental School were combined 
to create a distinct department of the 
university under state supervision and 
control. In 1970 the Dental School 
moved into Hayden-Harris Hall, a new 
five-story building with modern equip- 
ment and treatment facilities. 



Programs of Study 

The Dental School today offers one of 
the finest programs of dental education 
in the world. Continuing efforts are 
made to provide educational and train- 
ing experiences consistent with evolving 
concepts and advances in the delivery of 
dental health care. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program. 
the school offers baccalaureate and mas- 
ter's degree programs in dental hygiene. 
These programs are designed to prepare 
students for careers in dental hygiene 
practice, education, management and re- 
search in private and public settings. 
Graduate programs leading to a master's 
or doctoral degree in anatomy, bio- 
chemistry, microbiology, oral pathology 
and physiology are also offered. The 
most recent addition to the graduate 
program is a combined D.D.S./Ph.D. in 
physiology. This program is designed to 
train students to become dental re- 
searchers for careers in academic dentis- 
try A large number of faculty members 
are actively engaged in research; re- 
search opportunities are available to 
dental students as well as to graduate 
and postgraduate students. 

Advanced dental education programs 
are offered in the specialty areas of en- 
dodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, 
orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, 
periodontics and prosthodontics. Pro- 
grams leading to the degree Master of 
Science are available through the gradu- 
ate school to candidates seeking certifi- 
cates of advanced education in the 
dental specialties. Also offered are a 
school-based residency program in ad- 
vanced general dentistry providing ad- 
vanced level training in the practice of 
comprehensive general dentistry, a hos- 
pital-based general practice residency 
program through the Dental School and 
the I niversitj oi Maryland Medical Sys- 
tem and an advanced general dentistry 
program for dentists serving on faculties 
of foreign dental schools. 



The Center for Professional Develop- 
ment offers an integrated curriculum to 
meet the ongoing educational needs < »f 
health care professionals. Designed to 
refine diagnostic skills and update 
knowledge in technical and scientific 
areas, courses are conducted annually in 
special facilities designed for the 
program. 

In 1983 the Dental School opened 
the Center for the Study of Human Per- 
formance in Dentistry, a unique educa- 
tional, research and treatment complex 
which is the only facility of its kind in 
the Western Hemisphere. It provides stu- 
dents and faculty diverse opportunities 
for the stud}-, utilization and evaluation 
of advanced concepts of dental educa- 
tion and care delivery, with a primary 
focus on human performance. Because 
of its potential as a model for universal 
application to the training of dental per- 
sonnel, the World Health Organization 
has designated the Dental School a WHO 
Collaborating Center for the Review and 
Evaluation of Performance Simulation 
Training Systems in Oral Health Care. 

Approaching its 150th anniversary 
year, the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore continues to 
fulfill, through its graduates, the aspira- 
tions of its founders to provide scien- 
tifically trained professionals to serve the 
oral health care needs of society. 



Student Body 

Four hundred two (-402 ) students were 
enrolled in the dental program in the 
198"*-88 academic year. Of these. 34 per- 
cent were female: 25 percent were mi- 
nority. The first-year class represented a 
variety of undergraduate institutions 
across the country. Students enrolled 
averaged 2-t years of age, and tour en- 
tered with master's degrees. The faculty 
presently numbers nearly 300 persons. 
including practitioners who teach at the 
school part-time. 

Museum of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery 

The Museum of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery is located in the reading 
room of the Independent Learning Cen- 
ter on the ground floor of Hayden-Harris 
Hall. Some special displays are appropri- 
ately located in other areas of the 
building. 

Because ( >f its heritage from the Bal- 
timore College of Dental Surgery and 
the importance of Baltimore in the de- 
velopment of professional dentistry, the 
museum has developed a large and valu- 
able collection of objects and specimens 
of historical and professional interest. 
Items currently on display in the mu- 
seum include dental chairs and opera- 
tories from various periods of dental 
history, instrument cabinets, early instru- 
ments, dentures representing the various 
stages through which the art of dental 
prosthesis progressed, the Guerini cabi- 
net containing replicas of dental ap- 
pliances from the most ancient times 
through the 18th century, and portraits 
of leaders in the development of profes- 
sional dentistry. 



The museum and the Independent 
Learning Center are open throughouj 
the year Monday through Friday from 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with extended 
hours evenings and Saturdays during 
the regular academic year. Group tours 
are welcome, but arrangements must 
be made in advance by calling 
(301)328-7944. 

Special Lectures 
The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lec- 
ture. Through the generosity of both his 
family and the school alumni, an en- 
dowed lectureship was established in 
memory- of the late Dr. Grayson W. 
Gaver, an outstanding leader in the field 
of prosthodontics and a distinguished 
member of the faculty for many years. 
The Gaver Lecture is presented bien- 
nially as part of Student-Faculty Day 
activities. 

The Stephen E. and Jeffrey A. Kleiman 
Lectures in Dentistry and Medicine. As a 
tribute to the selection of careers in the 
health professions by his sons. Dr. Ber- 
nard S. Kleiman established this annual 
lecture program to alternate between 
the University of Maryland Dental School 
and the School of Medicine. Distin- 
guished individuals are invited to lecture 
on topics pertinent and applicable to 
practicing dentists or physicians. The 
Kleiman Lecture alternates with the 
Gaver Lecture as part of Student-Faculty 
Day activities. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell 
Lecture. In 1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. 
William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell, pre- 
sented the school with a generous con- 
tribution for the purpose of instituting 
special lectures for the benefit of the stu- 
dent body and faculty. The first lecture 
in the series was presented in April 1966. 
These lectures provide a means of en- 
riching the total academic program. 




The Jane Boswell Toomcy and Lewis 
Cole Toomey, D.D.S. Memorial Lecture. 

Endowed in 1982 by a major gift from 
the Toomey family, together with contri- 
butions by friends and associates of Dr. 
and Mrs. Toomey, this biennial lecture 
was initiated during the 1985-86 aca- 
demic year. The Toomey Lecture pro- 
vides a forum for distinguished 
individuals to speak on timely dental re- 
search and clinical topics useful to den- 
tal professionals in practice and teaching. 
The lectures are open to all members of 
the dental community. 

In addition to these annual lectures, 
there are three special lectures which 
are presented on a rotating basis once 
every three years as part of the Com- 
mencement/Alumni Week activities: The 
John E. Fogarty Memorial Lecture, spon- 
sored by the Rhode Island Section of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
Alumni Association; The Hayden-Harris 
Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the 
Alumni Association; and The J. Ben 
Robinson Memorial Lecture, sponsored 
by the Maryland Section of the American 
College of Dentists 



THE CAMPUS 

The Dental School is an integral part of 
this campus for the professions. Located 
on 32 acres in downtown Baltimore, the 
campus began in 1807 with the founding 
of the School of Medicine. In 1840 it was 
joined by the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery and today these two schools 
share the campus with the Schools of 
Law, Nursing, Pharmacy, Social Work and 
Community Planning; an interprofes- 
sional Graduate School; and the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Medical System. While 
serving the citizens of Maryland, faculty 
and students on this campus have oppor- 
tunities to join with other professionals 
in interdisciplinary study, informal ex- 
change of ideas and interprofessional 
clinical practice and research. 




The Health Sciences Library 

The Health Sciences Library serves all 
components on the University of Marx- 
land at Baltimore campus. Currently the 
library has over 290,000 volumes and 
over 3,100 periodical subscriptions. The 
collection size ranks the library among 
the 15 largest health sciences libraries in 
the United States. 

The library has one of the most ad- 
vanced automated library systems in the 
country. Circulation services are com- 
pletely automated as is the catalog that 
provides access to library holdings. The 
online catalog can be accessed from any 
computer terminal on the UMAB campus 
that is linked to the campus network, as 
well as from any dial access terminal. 
The library also provides access to a 
wide range of automated databases of 
the journal literature through its com- 
puterized reference and bibliographic 



services (CRABS). MaryMED, a self- 
service data base system, is also available 
for persons who prefer to perform their 
own literature searches. 

The library is open 8 a.m. -10 p.m. 
(Monday-Friday). 9 a.m. -5 p.m. (Satur- 
day), and noon-8 p.m. (Sunday). Special 
holiday and summer hours are posted. 
Borrowers must show a L'MAB ID badge 
validated for the current year. 

Computer Resources 

To make the benefits of information 
technology available on the UMAB 
campus, the Information Resources Man- 
agement Division (IRMD) staffs and 
maintains two Technology Assisted 
Learning (TAL) Centers for faculty, staff 
and student use. These centers, which 
were established to meet the special 
needs of the health sciences community, 
provide access to microcomputers and 
offer support in their use. 

In addition, the IRMD offers access to 
mainframe computers on both the 
UMAB and College Park campuses 
through the facilities of Academic Coin 
puting. The system has the capabilities 
provided b\ Basic, Fortran, Pascal and 



PL-1 languages as well as statistical anal- 
ysis packages SPSS-X. SAS and BMDP In- 
structional services are available as well 
as help desk and first aid functions to as- 
sist students in using computing and as- 
sociated technologies to full advantage. 
Call 328-2383 for more information 
about these services. 

THE CITY 

In addition to professional oppor- 
tunities, the city of Baltimore, twelfth 
largest in the nation, offers a stimulating 
environment in which to live and study 
Having been the location of many signifi- 
cant events in the nation's history, in- 
cluding the writing of the national 
anthem, the city maintains a strong feel- 
ing for the past as typified by the many 
charming neighborhoods of restored 
houses and abundance of historic build- 
ings. Baltimore combines the sophistica- 
tion of a large metropolitan city with 
easy accessibility to surrounding moun- 
tains, beaches and rural areas. 

Several blocks from campus is the 
nationally acclaimed Inner Harbor area, 
where Harborplace, the National Aquar- 
ium, the Maryland Science Center and 
office buildings share an attractive water- 
front with sailboats, hotels, restaurants 
and renovated townhouses. Connecting 
this downtown area to the outskirts of 
the city is the new Baltimore Metro sub- 
way system, the first leg of an anticipated 
city-wide subway system. 

As a cultural center. Baltimore has of- 
ferings to please the most discriminat- 
ing, including a world-class symphony 
orchestra, many tine museums, libraries 
and professional theatre groups. For 
sports fans, Baltimore features Orioles 
baseball. Blast soccer, collegiate and club 
lacrosse and the nationally acclaimed 
Preakness. Nearby, the Chesapeake Bay 
offers unparalleled water sports and the 
seafood for which the region is famous. 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



APPLICATION/ADMISSION 

Equal Opportunity 

The University of Maryland is an equal 
opportunity institution with respect 
to both education and employment. 
The university's policies, programs and 
activities are in conformance with 
pertinent federal and state laws and 
regulations on nondiscrimination 
regarding race, color, religion, age, 
national origin, sex and handicap. 

The Dental School has the objective 
of securing a broad racial, sexual and 
ethnic balance in its enrollment. To 
achieve this objective it gives every 
consideration to minority student 
applications. 

Requirements for Admission to 
the Dental Program 

The Dental School has established new- 
criteria for admission, which permit flex- 
ibility in the choice of an undergraduate 
program while remaining discriminative 
with regard to scholastic achievement. 
Students who are majoring in either sci- 
ence or non-science disciplines are en- 
couraged to apply. In addition, those 
individuals with a successful career out- 
side of dentistry, who are interested in 
changing their careers, will be seriously 
considered in the admissions process. In 
every case, evidence will be sought that 
applicants have undertaken a challenging 
baccalaureate degree program that in- 
cludes courses in the liberal arts, hu- 
manities, and social and behavioral 
sciences. 

Applicants to the dental program 
must successfully complete at least three 
academic years ( 90 credit hours ) in an 
accredited college of arts and sciences. 
Because dentistry is a science-based 
profession, candidates must include in 




their undergraduate curriculum at least 
a basic background in chemistry and 
biology, for which aptitude should be 
demonstrated. In most cases this 
requirement may be satisfied by courses 
in inorganic chemistry and general biol- 
ogy. Each course should be one year in 
length and should include adequate lab- 
oratory experiences. Advanced courses 
in the sciences are not required for 
favorable consideration. The Office of 
Admissions reserves the right to modify 
the prerequisites in exceptional cases 
when an applicant's background sup- 
plants the need for such courses or 
when additional courses are necessary 
to improve an applicants preparation for 
dental school. 

No more than 60 of the minimum re- 
quired credits will be accepted from a 
junior college; these credits must have 
been validated by an accredited college 
of arts and sciences. All admission re- 
quirements must be completed by June 
30 prior to the desired date of ad- 
mission. Applicants must also present 



favorable recommendations from their 
respective predental committee or. if no 
such committee is available, from one in- 
structor each in the departments of biol- 
ogy and chemistry. In all other respects, 
applicants must give every promise of 
becoming successful students and den- 
tists of high standing. Applicants will not 
be admitted with unabsolved conditions 
or unabsolved failures. 

The admission decision will be 
based upon performance in previous ac- 
ademic programs, the quality of those 
programs, and personal factors, as evi- 
denced by letters of recommendation, 
extracurricular activities and a personal 
interview. Maryland residents should 
have science and cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) values of 2.5 or higher to 
be competitive for admission: nonresi- 
dents should have GPA values of 2.8 or 



higher. All applicants are encouraged to 
take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) 
no later than October of the year prior 
to admission. 

A pamphlet describing the test and 
an application to take the test will be 
sent to the applicant upon request to the 
Office of Admissions and Recruitment of 
the Dental School. The pamphlet lists 
the dates of the tests (given in April and 
October) and the location of testing cen- 
ters throughout the United States, its 
possessions and Canada. Candidates 
should have scores of 4 or higher in the 
Academic Average and the Perceptual 
Ability sections in order to be competi- 
tive. The DAT will be used as an adjunct 
to the applicant's educational credentials 
rather than as an independent determi- 
nant of admissibility. However, the lower 
the applicants science GPA, the more im- 
portant are the results of the DAT. 

Residency 

Information on the regulations for the 
determination of resident status may be 
obtained from the Office of Records and 
Registrations, 621 West Lombard Street, 
Room 326, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Application and Acceptance 
Procedures 

Students are admitted only at the begin- 
ning of the fall semester in August. All 
applications are processed through the 
American Association of Dental Schools 
Application Service (AADSAS). An 
AADSAS application request card is avail- 
able to applicants after May 1 of the year 
prior to the desired date of admission 
upon request to the Office of Admissions 
and Recruitment of the Dental School. 
The AADSAS application must be tiled by 
all applicants prior to February 1; early 
filing of the a/plication is strongly rec- 
ommended AADSAS will duplicate the 
transcript, calculate the grade point aver- 
age oi each applicant, and furnish perti- 
nent information to the Dental School. 



If the requirements for admission are 
fulfilled, the applicant will receive the 
Dental Schools application form, which 
should be completed and mailed with 
the application fee to the Office of Ad- 
missions and Recruitment of the Dental 
School. If receipt of the application and 
application fee is not acknowledged 
within ten days, the applicant should 
contact the admissions office. All appli- 
cants who are seriously being consid- 
ered will be interviewed; a personal 
interview does not, however, guarantee 
admission. The Subcommittee on Dental 
Student Admissions, composed of mem- 
bers of the faculty, students and alumni, 
selects qualified applicants for admission 
based on the applicants grade point 
average, DAT scores, personal recom- 
mendations and the personal interview. 
A deposit of $200 must accompany an 
applicant's acceptance of an offer of ad- 
mission. The deposit is intended to en- 
sure registration in the class and is 
credited toward the applicants tuition. 
One-half of the deposit is refundable un- 
til May 1 if the Dental School is able to 
fill the vacancy caused by a withdrawal. 

Admission with Advanced 
Standing 

It is the policy of the Faculty Council of 
the Dental School that neither graduates 
of foreign dental schools nor students 
transferring from dental schools outside 
the continental United States be consid- 
ered for admission with advanced stand- 
ing. Students currently attending a dental 
school in the continental United States 
may apply for admission with advanced 
standing (transfer), but must be in good 
standing in scholarship and character to 
be considered for admission. 
An applicant for transfer from another 
dental school must: 

• Meet fully the requirements for admis- 
sion described above 

• Be eligible for advancement to the 
next higher class in the school from 
which the applicant seeks to transfer 

• I lave an overall average of C ( 2.0 on a 
4.0 scale) in all previous dental school 
courses excluding basic dental science 
or us equivalent and oral pathology, in 
which the applicant must have a grade 
of C t)i' higher 



• Present a letter of honorable with- 
drawal and recommendation from the 
dean of the school from which the ap- 
plicant is transferring 
All applicants who meet these require- 
ments will be sent the Dental School's 
application forms and will be scheduled 
for an interview. They will be required 
to submit from the dental school which 
they are currently attending an academic 
record and a detailed course outline for 
each dental school course completed 
prior to transfer. Each record will be 
evaluated by appropriate department 
chairmen of the Dental School for rec- 
ommendation concerning acceptance of 
transfer credit. The admission of a stu- 
dent by transfer is, in every case, con- 
tingent upon the availability of space in 
the class to which the student is seeking 
admission. Credit hours, as listed in the 
prior academic record of the transferring 
student, will be prorated to conform 
with the cumulative credit hours of stu- 
dents in that class, in order to establish a 
comparable cumulative grade point aver- 
age and class rank for purposes of uni- 
versity and Dental School honors and 
letters of recommendation. Any student 
accepted for admission may be ex- 
empted from certain courses by passing 
a competency examination. 

UMES-UMAB Honors Program 

The University of Maryland Eastern 
Shore (UMES), in cooperation with the 
professional schools of the University 
of Maryland at Baltimore (L'MAB), in- 
stituted an Honors Program in an effort 
to prepare students for professional 
school study while providing them with 
a sound liberal arts education at the 
same time. The Honors Program consists 
of honors sections in chemistry, biology, 
mathematics. English and social science. 
It also emphasizes independeni study, 
seminars and colloquia through which 
students are expected to explore in 
depth the various disciplines. Specific 
preprofessional tracks in allied health, 







dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, phar- 
macy, and social work and community 
planning are available. Upon successful 
completion of all requirements of the 
Honors Program, which include the pro- 
fessional school admission require- 
ments, the Honors Program graduate 
will be admitted into the corresponding 
professional school on the UMAB 
campus during the year immediately 
following graduation from UMES. 

Admission into the Honors Program 
is determined by the Honors Program 
Committee which is composed of repre- 
sentatives from UMES and each profes- 
sional school at UMAB. A combination of 
predictive factors, such as SAT scores, in- 
terviews, letters of recommendation and 
a personal statement written at the time 
of the interview will be used to deter- 
mine the eligibility of a student for ad- 
mission into the Honors Program. The 
cumulative academic performance of an 
applicant, as indicated by the high school 
record, will be assessed. For additional 
information, write to the Honors Com- 
mittee, University of Maryland Eastern 
Shore, Princess Anne, Marvland 21853. 



Combined Arts and Sciences/ 
Dental Program 

Although the Dental School supports a 
coherent four-year program of under- 
graduate education for most students, it 
recognizes that some individuals may be 
prepared to enter after three years. The 
University of Maryland College Park. 
University of Maryland Baltimore 
County, Bowie State College, Coppin 
State College, Morgan State University 
and Salisbury State College offer a com- 
bined curriculum leading to the degrees 
of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of 
Dental Surgery. The preprofessional part 
of this curriculum is taken in residence 
in the college of arts and sciences on any 
of the six campuses, and the professional 
part at the Dental School in Baltimore. 
Students who have been approved for 
the combined program and who have 
completed the arts and sciences phase 
may, upon the recommendation of the 
dean of the Dental School, be granted 
the degree of Bachelor of Science by the 
undergraduate college following the 
completion of the student's first year in 
the Dental School. Further information 
and applications may be obtained from 
the office of admissions at the respective 
undergraduate college. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND 
PROGRAMS 

In the evaluation of student perfor- 
mance, the following letter grades are 
used: 

A — excellent 

B — good 

C — satisfactory 

D — below average 

E — conditional 

F — failure 

I — incomplete 

A failure must be absolved by repeat- 
ing the entire course, in which case the 
original F grade remains on the student's 
permanent record, but only the new 
grade is used to compute the grade 
point average. 

A student whose performance is not 
satisfactory in one or more segments of 
a course or in some clinical procedures 
may receive an E grade. This grade indi- 
cates that the student has failed to master 
a limited segment of a course but should 
achieve a satisfactory level of proficiency 
within a short time. When the E grade 
is used as a temporary final grade it re- 
mains on the student record. Following 
successful remediation, the student will 
receive the final grade earned in the 
course. An unresolved grade of E will re- 
sult in a permanent grade of F 

Students whose work in completed 
assignments is of acceptable quality but 
who, because of circumstances bey< >nd 
their control (such as illness or dis- 
ability), have been unable to complete 
course requirements will receive a grade 
of Incomplete. When all requirements 
have been satisfied, students will receive 
the final grade earned in the course. Ex- 
cept under extraordinary circumstances, 
an Incomplete may not be carried into 
the next academic year. 

Since performance at the D level is 
unacceptable in the clinical sciences, the 




D grade is not used by the clinical de- 
partments or Basic Dental Science. 

Scholastic averages are computed on 
the basis of credits assigned to each 
course and the following numerical 
values for grades: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-l, F-0. 
The grade point average is the sum of 
the products of course credits and grade 
values, divided by the total number of 
course credits in that year of the 
curriculum. 

The performance of each student is 
reviewed at the end of each semester by 
the appropriate advancement committee. 
The committee determines, on the basis 
of progress and/or final grades, whether 
the student is progressing satisfactorily 
or if remediation or assignment to a spe- 
cial program (first- or second-year stu- 
dents only) is warranted. 

Students assigned to a special pro- 
gram are placed under the supervision 
of the special Academic Programs Com- 
mittee, which tailors a program to the 
needs and abilities of each student and 
reviews progress, recommends remedia- 
tion, determines advancement or recom- 
mends dismissal on the basis of progress 
and/or final grades at the end oi each 
semester. 



All first- and second-year students 
must have completed satisfactorily the 
first two years of the curriculum before 
advancement into the regular third-year 
curriculum is approved. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade 
point average and passing grades in all 
courses in order to advance uncondi- 
tionally to the next year. Conditional 
advancement may be assigned to third- 
year students who have not successfully 
completed all courses but who, in the 
judgment of the advancement committee. 
should be afforded the opportunity to 
complete third-year requirements while- 
proceeding with fourth-year courses. 
Probationary advancement may be 
assigned to students in the following 
categories: 

1. First- and second-year students who 
obtain a grade point average of 
L.70-1.99 and haw passing grades in 
all courses 

2. Third-year students who obtain a 
grade point average of 1.85-1.99 in 
third-year courses and passing grades 
in all courses 

A student placed on probationary sta 
tus must achieve a minimum 2.0 average 
and pass all courses taken during the 
probationary academic war. failure to 
do so will result in dismissal from the 
dental program subject to discretionary 
review by the Faculty Council. 



A student may be permitted to ab- 
solve deficiencies during the summer 
session, as recommended by the 
appropriate advancement committee. 
Depending on the type of deficiencies 
involved, students may be required to 
register and pay a fee for the summer 
session. Students with deficiencies too 
severe to be absolved during the sum- 
mer session may be afforded the oppor- 
tunity to repeat or remediate a specific 
year of the dental program. Remediation 
of the year provides students who would 
otherwise have to repeat the year's work 
in its entirety with the opportunity for 
exemption from courses or portions of 
courses at the discretion of the depart- 
ment chairman. Students who are re- 
peating or remediating any war of the 
dental program are automatically placed 
on probation. 

If it is determined that a student is 
progressing so poorly that remediation 
will not bring him/her to a passing level, 
dismissal will be recommended to the 
Faculty Council. 

The appropriate advancement com- 
mittee determines for each student 
either unconditional advancement, 
conditional or probationary advance- 
ment, repeat or remediation of the year, 
or recommends academic dismissal to 
the faculty Council, which approves all 
decisions pertaining to dismissal or 
graduation. A student may appeal any ac- 
tion of an advancement committee or 
the faculty Council by submission of a 
written request to the dean. 



Specially Tailored Educational 
Program 

The Specially Tailored Educational Pro- 
gram (STEP) functions within the frame- 
work of the regular curriculum but 
allows students to spend up to three 
years completing first- and second-year 
courses. The program was developed for 
students who, because of academic diffi- 
culty, illness or other circumstances, 
need special assistance and/or additional 
time to fulfill the academic require- 
ments. It also accommodates the specific 
program needs of students transferring 
from other institutions. 

The First and Second Year Advance- 
ment Committees may offer a student 
the option of STEP or assign to STEP any 
student whose progress is unsatisfactory 
if it is generally agreed that a reduced 
load and/or special tutorial assistance 
may improve the students chance of 
successfully completing course require- 
ments. Students assigned to STEP are 
placed under the supervision of the 
Special Academic Programs Committee, 
which plans an individualized program 
for each student and carefully monitors 
progress. Departmental counselors in 
the basic sciences and preclinical sci- 
ences are available to assist any student 
assigned to STEP. 

Students may be advanced into the 
regular program when they have dem- 
onstrated satisfactory progress; other- 
wise they remain in STEP until they have 
completed all first- and second-year 
courses. Once the student is advanced 
into the regular program, academic 
progress is evaluated by the appropriate 
advancement committee. 



Attendance Policy 

The faculty and administration of the 
Dental School expect every student to 
attend all scheduled lectures, seminars, 
laboratory sessions and clinic assign- 
ments, except in the event of illness or 
emergency. Since attendance is manda- 
tory, excused absences must be reported 
to the dean's office so that departments 
may be advised to offer assistance upon 
the student's return. 

The Minimester 

In the January minimester, students in all 
years of the dental program may choose 
to take elective courses when required 
courses are not scheduled. The clinic 
continues to operate on the usual sched- 
ule during the minimester. Any credit 
awarded for minimester elective courses 
will not be applied to the D.D.S. degree. 
Undergraduate students contemplat- 
ing a career in dentistry' may attend this 
session on a per course basis. Informa- 
tion concerning course offerings is dis- 
tributed to prospective students by the 
Office of Admissions and Recruitment 
and to all enrolled students by the Office 
of Academic and Student Affairs. 




REQUIREMENTS FOR 
GRADUATION 

The degree Doctor of Dental Surgery is 
conferred upon a candidate who has met 
the conditions specified below: 

1. A candidate must have satisfied all 
requirements of the various 
departments. 

2. A candidate must pass all fourth-year 
courses and achieve a minimum 2.0 
average in the fourth year. 

3. The candidate must have paid all 
debts to the university prior to 
graduation. 

Graduation Dates 

Students who enter the D.D.S. program 
at the University of Maryland Dental 
School are required to complete a mini- 
mum of four academic years at the 
school. The length of the program has 
been established in order to provide for 
the students a comprehensive pr< )fes- 
sional education. Graduation for stu- 
dents who complete the program within 
this prescribed period is in May. Stu- 
dents who fail to complete all require- 
ments in May may be considered for 
graduation the following August, January 
or May, as they are judged ready to do 
so. 

EMPLOYMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES IN 
DENTISTRY 

The public demand for more and better 
oral health care will continue to create a 
climate for growth in the dental profes- 
sion. Current dental graduates can antici- 
pate initial annual net income on the 
average of $35,000 per annum. This in- 
come is contingent upon and can be af- 
fected by the area served, the practice 
specialty, and the state of the economy ai 
the time. 



THE DENTAL CURRICULUM 



\V 



YEAR I 

SUBJECT 




CREDIT 




Semester 

1 2 


Total 


Anatomy 


13 




13 


Basic Dental Science 




2 


2 


Biochemistry 


5 




5 


Conjoint Sciences I 




3 


3 


Microbiology 




5 


5 


Physiology 




5 


5 


Oral and Maxillofacial 1 1 
Surgery 


Dental Anatomy 
Occlusion 


4 




4 


Operative Dentistry 




5 


5 


Oral Health Care 
Delivery 


1 


2 


3 


)-jr?ediatric Dentistry 1 1 


■{ Periodontics 


1 


1 


2 



25 



49 



YEAR II 
SUBJECT 




CREDIT 




Semester 
1 2 


Total 


Basic Dental Science 


1 


2 


3 


Biomedicine 


5 


- 


12 


Conjoint Sciences II 


6 


6 


12 


Oral Health Care 
1 )eliver\ 


1 


2 


3 


Pharmacology 


5 




5 


Oral and Maxillofacial 1 1 
Surgery 


Endodontics 1 1 


Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 


3 


3 


6 


Orthodontics 1 1 


Periodontics 1 1 


Removable 
Prosthodontics 


3 


3 


6 



9* 




YEAR III 
SUBJECT 




CREDIT 




Semester 

J 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences III 


2 


2 


4 


Oral Diagnosis; 
Radiology 


4 


3 


7 


Oral Health Care 
Delivery 

or 

Special Studies ( elective ) 


3 


3 


6 
(6) 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery 


2 


1 


3 


Orthodontics 


1 


1 


2 


Pediatric Dentistry 


4 


4 


8 


Periodontics 


(1 


5 


11 


Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 


6 


7 


13 


Removable 
Prosthodontics 


4 


4 


8 


Endodontics 


2 


2 


4 



34 32 66 



YEAR IV 
SI IBJECT 





Semester 
1 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences l\ 


3 3 


6 


Clinic 


29 31 


60 



DEPARTMENTS/PROGRAMS 

Anatomy 

Acting Chairman: Sue-ning C. Barry 
Professor: Barry 
Research Professor: Provenza 
Associate Professors: Gartner, Hiatt. 

Meszler, Seibel 
Research Assistant Professor: Hollinger 
The basic course in human anatomy con- 
sists of a thorough study of the cells, 
tissues, organs and organ systems of the 
body from the gross, microscopic and 
developmental aspects. Principles of 
body structure and function are studied 
with particular emphasis on those con- 
cerned with the head, facial region, oral 
cavity and associated organs. Neuroanat- 
omy deals with the gross and micro- 
scopic structure of the central nervous 
system and peripheral nerves with spe- 
cial attention to functional components 
related to general sensory and motor 
systems. Correlation is made with other 
courses in the basic science and clinical 
disciplines of the dental curriculum. The 
department conducts research and grad- 
uate training in craniofacial develop- 
ment and teratology, ultrastructural 
bases for neuronal pathways and gingival 
overgrowth. 
DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 

Basic Dental Science 

Director: Harold L. Crossley 
Associate Professor: Crossley 
Staff: All clinical departments 
Basic Dental Science is the administra- 
tive unit responsible for the coordina- 
tion of the preclinical dental sciences 
during the first and second years of the 
curriculum. Areas of instruction include 
dental morphology and occlusion, pre- 
ventive dentistry, periodontics, dental 
materials, operative dentistry, fixed par- 
tial prosthodontics, removable complete 
and partial prosthodontics, endodontics, 
pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, oral 
surgery, oral diagnosis, radiology and 
dental practice systems. The instruc- 
tional format includes the use of 



10 



lectures, laboratory projects, self- 
instructional media, assigned reading, 
clinical assignments, and both written 
and practical examinations. Lecture and 
laboratory sequencing are coordinated 
by the director and involve the coopera- 
tive effort of members of all clinical 
departments. 

DENT 512. Basic Dental Science (2) 
DENT 528. Basic Dental Science (3) 

Biochemistry 

Chairman: Charles B. Leonard, Jr. 
Professors: Chang, Leonard 
Associate Professors: Bashirelahi, 

Callery, Thut 
Research Professor: Varma 
Assistant Professor: Courtade 

Biochemistry is a study of life's pro- 
cesses in terms of molecular structure of 
food substances and body constituents. 
The department has two teaching goals: 
to present a comprehensive course in 
biochemistry to the first-year students 
seeking a professional degree in dentis- 
try, and to provide a program of spe- 
cialized training for graduate students 
seeking an advanced graduate degree 
(M.S., Ph.D.) in preparation for a career 
in teaching and/or research. 

The course provided for dental stu- 
dents covers the major traditional sub- 
jects of biochemistry. Dental students 
who have previously taken a course in 
biochemistry may take a competency ex- 
amination which, if passed satisfactorily, 
permits them to be excused from taking 
this course. 

The department participates in the 
Conjoint Sciences program and is cur- 
rently involved in research projects 
concerned with the isolation, charac- 
terization and immunogenicity of bac- 
terial lipids; brain metabolism of amino 
acids and the neurological signifi- 
cance of their metabolites as potential 



neurotransmitters and/or modulators 
for neurotransmission; induction and 
regulation of enzymes in amino acid 
catabolic pathways; action of steroid 
hormones on soluble intracellular cyto- 
plasmic or nuclei receptors; and charac- 
terization of progesterone receptors 
from human prostate. 
DBIC 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 

Clerkship Program 

Two elective clerkship programs allow 
selected fourth-year students to pursue 
further studies in departmental activities 
specially designed to meet their needs 
and interests. Students devote a portion 
of their clinic time to these specialized 
programs; the remaining clinic time is 
spent in the comprehensive treatment of 
patients in the regular program. Clerk- 
ships are available in basic science and 
clinical disciplines and several incorpo- 
rate off-campus clinical experiences in 
various practice settings. 
DCJS 558. Clerkship I (elective ) (20) 
DCJS 559. Clerkship II (elective) (10) 

Clinical Dentistry 

Staff: All clinical departments 
The clinical education program is de- 
signed to provide each student with a 
broad background of clinical experience 
based on the philosophy of prevention 
and comprehensive patient care. Al- 
though the need for the treatment of 
existing disease is of paramount 
importance, the clinical program 
stresses those aspects of complete dental 
care which are founded on preventing 
the occurrence or recurrence of disease. 
Each student provides patient care in a 
manner similar to the general practi- 
tioner in the community. Clinical areas 
for undergraduate instruction are desig- 
nated primarily as general practice 
clinics. Team teaching is accomplished 
using general dentists and specialists 
providing interdepartmental instruction 
for the student and the highest level of 
dental care for the patient. The clinical 
program functions year round in order 
to provide continuity of patient care. 



Conjoint Sciences 

Director: Harold L. Crossley 
Associate Professor: Crossley 
Staff: All departments 
Conjoint Sciences is the administrative 
unit responsible for the coordination of 
subjects which are most appropriately 
presented in a multidisciplinary ap- 
proach. In the first year, Conjoint Sci- 
ences is primarily devoted to human 
growth and development and an intro- 
duction to the clinical programs avail- 
able to the student in caring for the 
dental patient. 

Immunology, diagnosis and treat- 
ment of pulp and periapical disease, car- 
iology, prevention, clinical aspects of 
head and neck anatomy and dental anes- 
thesiology are subjects presented in the 
second year of Conjoint Sciences. Cer- 
tification for cardiopulmonary resus- 
citation (CPR) and blood pressure 
measurement also are required com- 
ponents of this program. 

The third year of Conjoint Sciences 
deals primarily with the management of 
clinical problems. Topics include dental 
management of the handicapped patient, 
therapeutics and general anesthesia. 

The curriculum in the fourth year in- 
cludes an exploration of dental practice 
options and decisions, temporomandi- 
bular dysfunctions and a series of lectures 
on medical emergencies in the dental 
office. A wide range of elective courses is 
also offered in the fourth year Conjoint 
Sciences curriculum. 
DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences 1(3) 
DCJS 528. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 
DCJS 538. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 
DCJS 548. Conjoint Sciences IV (6) 



11 



Dental Care for the Handicapped 

Director. Special Patient Program: 

Roger L. Eldridge 
Assistant Professor: Eldridge 
Clinical Assistant Professor: Bow man 
Clinical Instructors: Deitrick, Stoker 
Lectures on the nature of handicapping 
and medically compromising conditions 
and their effects on the patient are pre- 
sented in the first three years of the 
D.D.S. curriculum, utilizing independent 
learning resources augmented by faculty 
instruction. During the third and fourth 
years of the D.D.S. program, students are 
the primary providers for physically dis- 
abled, mentally handicapped and indi- 
viduals with special medical conditions 
or infectious diseases. All clinical care is 
provided in the Special Patient Clinic, a 
facility specifically designed and oper- 
ated f< >r the delivery of dental care to 
handicapped and medically compro- 
mised individuals of all ages. 

Department of Dentistry 

Chairman/Chief of Service: George H. 

Williams III 
Professor: Bergquist 
Assistant Professor: Williams 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Crooks, 

Ehrenreich, Vandermer 
The Department of Dentistry is a depart- 
ment of the Dental School and the Uni- 
versity ( >f Marx land Medical System. It is 
within this department that the General 
Practice Residency Program functions 
The Dental School provides faculty from 
its five basic sciences and 12 clinical sci- 
ence departments to support the didactic 
and clinical components of the General 
Practice Residency Program. 



Educational and Instructional 
Resources 

Chairman: James F. Craig 
Professor: Moreland 
Associate Professors: Craig, Romberg 
Clinical Associate Professor: Beach 
Dental School Assistant Professor: 

Zimmerman 
Clinical Assistant Professor: Solomon 
Clinical Instructor: Robinson 
Associate Staff: Land 
The Department of Educational and In- 
structional Resources has as its primary 
objective the implementation of a com- 
prehensive instructional development 
program embracing all areas of the den- 
tal curriculum. Such a program applies 
the principles of management to the pro- 
cess of education and is designed to 
maintain a constant focus on the quality 
of the education being provided stu- 
dents pursuing a career in dentistry or 
dental hygiene. Facilities include color 
television production and graphic and 
photographic support. A fully equipped 
Independent Learning Center housing 
study carrels and a wide variety of audio- 
visual equipment used in conjunction 
with assigned curricular materials is also 
available. Consultation on the develop- 
ment of instructional packages, media 
applications, research design, statistics. 
test construction and evaluation tech- 
niques and procedures is provided 
through the department's faculty and 
staff. 

The department's Division of Dental 
Informatics offers guidance and direc- 
tion in the application of computers and 
optical disc technology in dental and 
dental hygiene education. It is also re- 
sponsible for maintaining and support- 
ing the schools computerized dental 
clinic management system, It is in this 
department that one of the campus 
Technology Assisted Learning (TAL) 
(.enters is housed 

The Independent Learning Center is 
open more than 65 hours a week includ- 
ing evenings and Saturdays and provides 
a comfortable atmosphere for indepen- 
dent study. Students, faculty and practi- 
tioners are welcome to use these 
facilities at any time. 



Endodontics 

Chairman: Eric J. Hovland 
Professor Emeritus: Abramson 
Associate Professors: Hovland, Dumsha 
Dental School Associate Professor: Clem 
Clinical Associate Professors: 

Baumgartner. Krzeminski. Schunick 
Assistant Professor: Friedberg 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Berman. 

Delgado, Hyson, Quarantillo 
Instructors: Henry. McDonald 
Clinical Instructors: Bernie, Chen, 

Frankle, Koch, Mark, Mossier. Noguera. 

Patil, Waxman 
The students introduction to endodon- 
tics begins in the second year. It consists 
of a series of lectures, seminars and 
laboratories that stress both the funda- 
mentals and biologic principles of 
endodontics. 

In the third year, lectures are pre- 
sented which expand upon the basic ma- 
terial presented in the second year. Cases 
are treated clinically with the student 
demonstrating an acceptable level of 
mastery by the completion of the third 
year. The fourth-year experience in en- 
dodontics is primarily clinical. A mastery 
of clinical endodontics with more com- 
plex cases is expected of each student. 

The department conducts research in 
dental traumatology, dental materials and 
endodontic surgery. 
ENDO 522. Principles of Pre-Clinical 

Endodontics (1) 
ENDO 538. Principles of Clinical 

Endodontics ( 4 ) 
ENDO 548. Endodontic Clinic ( 4 ) 



Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

Chairman: George F. Buchness 
Professors: Greeley, Thompson 
Associate Professors: Buchness, Haroth, 

Strassler 
Clinical Associate Professors: Griswold, 

Livaditis 
Dental School Associate Professors: 

Bradbury, Gingell 
Assistant Professors: Litkowski, T. Miller, 

Payne, Tewes 
Dental School Assistant Professors: 

DiGianni. Wood 
Research Assistant Professor: Katayama 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Abraham, 

Greenbaum, Iddings, VandenBosche, 

Whitaker, Zeller 
Instructor: Shires 
Clinical Instructors: Barnes, Dietrich, 

Gerhardt, Gregory, Hack, Hemphill, 

Inge, Kushner, Matthews, Ruliffson, 

Scaggs, Tate, Zorn 
The scope of instruction in fixed resto- 
rative dentistry involves the art and sci- 
ence of replacing missing teeth and lost 
or diseased tooth structure with fixed 
(non-removable) restorations; the disci- 
plines of operative dentistry and fixed 
partial prosthodontics are included. The 
undergraduate teaching program is 
integrated throughout the four-year 
curriculum. 

The Department of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry is responsible for major seg- 
ments of the courses in Basic Dental Sci- 
ence, in which students are introduced 
to fundamental principles, and develop 
the manual skills necessary for clinical 
treatment of patients. The first-year pro- 
gram includes methods and materials 
used to restore individual teeth, and an 
understanding of the destructive process 
of dental caries and the preventive as- 
pects of restorative treatment. Second- 
year students are introduced to concepts 
and skills used in replacement of miss- 
ing teeth with fixed partial prostheses. 
Instructional methodology includes lec- 
tures, manual programs and laboratory 
exercises on simulated human dentition. 
During the first two years, limited but in- 
creasing clinical patient treatment with 
close staff supervision augments and re- 
inforces the foundation provided. 




During the third and fourth years, di- 
dactic instruction and extensive clinical 
treatment with staff guidance facilitate 
the application and integration of funda- 
mentals of operative dentistry and fixed 
partial prosthodontics. The department 
also participates in the Conjoint Sciences 
program. 

Research projects in Fixed Restora- 
tive Dentistry include fundamental re- 
search on adhesive bonding to dentin 
and bone; evaluation of the long term 
bond strength of commercial resins to 
dentin and enamel; long term clinical 
evaluation of "Maryland" bridges; clinical 
evaluation of new "esthetic restorative 
materials techniques" including por- 
celain and laboratory processed com- 
posite resins; investigations on the 
efficacy of dentin sealers and on the na- 
ture of the dentin smear layer; bonding 
of resins to metal and porcelain me- 
diated by the use of silane coupling 
agents; fatigue strength of teeth restored 
by various techniques; use of Weibull sta- 
tistics to predict the longevity and re- 
liability of restorative techniques and 
materials; and advanced curriculum de- 
sign (Performance Logic). 
FIXD 511. Dental Anatomy/Occlusion (4) 
FIXD 512. Operative Dentistry (5) 
FIXD 528. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (6) 
FIXD 538. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (13) 
FIXD 548. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (15) 



Microbiology 

Chairman: William A. Falkler, Jr. 
Professors: Falkler, Hawley, Krywolap, 

Suzuki 
Associate Professors: Delisle, Minah, 

Nauman, Sydiskis, Williams 
Associate Staff: Organ 
The Department of Microbiology offers 
undergraduate and graduate programs. 
The undergraduate program is 
organized to supply students with the 
fundamental principles of microbiology 
in order that they may understand the 
chemical and biological mechanisms of 
the production of disease by bacteria 
and other parasites, and the means by 
which the host protects itself against bac- 
teria and related organisms. The gradu- 
ate programs leading toward the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy are designed to train students 
for positions in research and teaching, 
particularly in dental schools. Research 
is currently being conducted in oral 
microbiology (caries and periodontal 
diseases), pathogenic microbiology, 
immunology, virology, microbial ge- 
netics, microbial ecology, cytology and 
microbial physiology. 
DMIC 512. Microbiology (5) 



13 




Oral Diagnosis 

Chairman: C. Daniel Overholser 
Professors: Hasler, Overholser, Peterson 
Associate Professors: DePaola, Kutcher, 

MeillerJ. Park 
Clinical Associate Professor: Bloom 
Assistant Professors: Balciunas, M. Siegel, 

G. Williams 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Brown, 

Freedman. Garber, Katz, Lee, Niessen, 

Weiner 
Instructor: Stansbury 
Clinical Instructors: Brooks. Burnett. 

Fine, Goldvarg, Herdoiza, S. Lever. 

S. Levin, Manson, Niehaus, Noppinger, 

Orbach. Palmer. Schreiber, M. Shulman, 

Varipapa 
The curriculum in oral diagnosis in- 
cludes the basic principles of the patient 
interview, the fundamentals of physical 
examination, recognition of Oral disease, 
and the management of patients with 
oral and or systemic disease 

Principles of Biomedicine, an inter- 
disi iplin.iiN course taught m conjunction 
with the Department of Oral Pathology, 
introduces die second war student to 



oral diagnosis through didactic presenta- 
tions concerning the patient interview, 
clinical examination, oral radiology and 
treatment planning. Clinical aspects of 
the course are introduced through Basic 
Dental Science. 

Principles of oral diagnosis are 
taught in the third and fourth years clini- 
cally and didactically. These courses re- 
inforce the concept that the dentist 
should receive adequate training in ob- 
taining medical histories, performing 
appropriate physical examinations, 
interpreting the results of various labora- 
tory tests and, most importantly, relating 
the physical status of the patient to the 
dental treatment plan. 

The department conducts research in 
dental management of medically com- 
promised patients, prevention of infec- 
tion in immuno-compromised patients, 
prevention of bacterial endocarditis, 
evaluation of drugs to treat bacterial and 
fungal infections of the oral cavity and 
the role of the papilloma virus in oral 
cancer. 

DPAT 528. Principles of Biomedicine ( 12) 
DPAT 538. Principles of Oral Diagnosis 

Radiology (7) 
DPAT 548. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/ 

Radiology ( -4 ) 



Oral Health Care Delivery 

Chairman: Leonard A. Cohen 
Professor: Morganstein 
Visiting Clinical Professor: Lan 
Associate Professor: L. A. Cohen 
Dental School Associate Professors: 

Dana. Swanson 
Clinical Associate Professors: Beach, 

Easley, E. Shulman, Snyder 
Assistant Professors: Belenky Eldridge, 

Grace. Manski 
Dental School Assistant Professor: 

Colangelo 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Bowman, 

DiNardo, Kronthal, Pusin, Streckfus, 

Wilson 
Instructors: L. Cohen, lmm, Schoen 
Clinical Instructors: Deitrick, Elggren, 

Lusk. Schoen, Stoker, Stout 
Special Lecturer: Abosch 
In its teaching, research and service ac- 
tivities, the Department of Oral Health 
Care Delivery continually develops, eval- 
uates and disseminates current and new 
information and methods to meet the 
needs of the providers and recipients nl 
care. 

The major areas of teaching responsi- 
bility are: ( 1 ) behavioral sciences. ( 2 ) 
dental practice management, (3) delivery 
systems, (4) epidemiology and scientific 
literature evaluation and (5) the clinical 
practice of dentistry utilizing human 
performance logic and appropriate auxil- 
iary personnel. During the four-year cur- 
riculum, students attend department 
sponsored lectures, seminars, indepen- 
dent and small group projects, and 
clinic. Field experiences and special 
projects are also used to support the 
teaching program. 

The curriculum includes the follow 
ing topics, first year — oral health care 



I i 



issues, epidemiology and review of sci- 
entific literature: second year — applied 
behavior analysis, communication, pa- 
tient compliance and stress management, 
and dental health education; third year 
— computer applications, accounting, fi- 
nance, economics, law, marketing, taxes, 
practice management (planning, organiz- 
ing, staffing and directing) and dental 
practice systems clinic; fourth year — 
application of dental management princi- 
ples, practice options and decisions, and 
dental practice systems clinic. The third- 
and fourth-year clinic programs demon- 
strate delivery system alternatives using 
human performance, behavioral and 
modern practice management concepts. 

The department conducts research in 
practice management, behavioral sci- 
ences and dental delivery systems. 
OHCD 518. Oral Health Care Delivery ( 3 ) 
OHCD 528. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 538. Oral Health Care Delivery (6) 
OHCD 548. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 

Chairman: Gerald W. Gaston 
Professors: DeVore, Gaston 
Clinical Professor: Tilghman 
Associate Professors: Bergman, Richter 
Clinical Associate Professors: Ashman, 

Kogan, North, Stanford 
Assistant Professor: Eisen 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Di Fabio, 

Eisenberg, D. Fried, Moselev, Nessif, 

Winne 
In the first year students are introduced 
to oral and maxillofacial surgery with 
lectures on the management of medical 
emergencies. Introductory material on 
minor oral and maxillofacial surgery, 
and lectures and demonstrations in local 
anesthesia are presented during the sec- 
ond year. 

Third- and fourth-year lectures covet- 
all phases of oral and maxillofacial sur- 
gery and advanced pain and anxiety con- 
trol. Students are rotated to the Oral and 




Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in block as- 
signments during the second, third and 
fourth wars for progressive participation 
in oral surgery procedures. 

Fourth-year students are scheduled 
on block assignments to the hospital for 
hospital dentistry, operating room expe- 
rience and general anesthesia experi- 
ence; they also take night calls with the 
oral and maxillofacial surgery and gen- 
eral practice residents. 

The department participates in all 
years of the Conjoint Sciences program 
concentrating in the fourth year on rec- 
ognition and management of medical 
emergencies in the dental office. Re- 
search is conducted in the evaluation of 
non-steroidal analgesics for postsurgical 
pain control and on the effects of 
hyaluronic acid on temporomandibular 
joint arthritis due to internal 
derangement. 
DSUR 512. Oral and Maxillofacial 

Surgery ( 1 ) 
DSUR 522. Oral and Maxillofacial 

Surgery ( 1 ) 
DSUR 538. Oral and Maxillofacial 

Surgery ( 3 ) 
DSUR 5-48. Oral and Maxillofacial 

Surgery (7) 



Oral Pathology 

Chairman: John J. Sauk 

Professor: Sauk 

Associate Professors: Beckerman, Levy, 

Swancar 
Assistant Professor: Archibald 
The undergraduate teaching program 
consists of an interdisciplinary course 
that covers the basic principles of path- 
ology and medicine through presenta- 
tion of the morphologic, chemical and 
physiologic changes of basic disease pro- 
cesses and important specific diseases. 
Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis, eti- 
ology, pathogenesis and clinical man- 
ifestations of disease processes in the 
oral cavity. The aim is to provide a sound 
basis for the differential diagnosis of oral 
lesions and a rationale for their treat- 
ment. The student is provided ample op- 
portunity- to develop proficiency in 
problem solving in oral diagnosis. A vari- 
ety of techniques for examination and 
diagnosis are covered, including dental 
radiography. 

The department presents courses for 
postgraduate students and offers gradu- 
ate programs leading to a master's or 
doctoral degree. Research and graduate 
training are conducted in the pathobiol- 
ogy of connective tissues and graduate 
training in surgical and experimental 
oral pathology. 
DPAT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 



15 



Orthodontics 

Chairman: William M. Davidson 
Professor: Davidson 
Clinical Associate Professor: Pavlick 
Assistant Professors: Archer, Hickory 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Bonebreak, 

Branoff. Fink.Junghans, Kyser, Long, 

Markin. Rubier. Sweren, Winne 
Clinical Instructors: Beinoras, Crist. 

DeMarco, Harnarayan, Josell, Pazulski, 

Philbin. Tilkin 
Associate Staff: Gipe 
The predoctoral program of instruction 
in orthodontics is directed toward 
providing the dental student with the 
knowledge and skills necessary to recog- 
nize an established or developing mal- 
occlusion, provide preventive and 
therapeutic treatment within the scope 
of the general dental practice, consult as 
a team member with the specialist, refer 
cases requiring specialist care as appro- 
priate and coordinate comprehensive 
care of the patient. 

Instruction in orthodontics occurs 
during all four years of the dental pro- 
gram. Didactic and laboratory exercises 
provide a strong foundation for delivery 
of limited orthodontic treatment as part 
of an adult and child patients comprehen- 
sive dental care. Elective and clerkship 
opportunities are available for those who 
wish to pursue additional course work 
and clinical experience. 

The department conducts research in 
growth and development, the biology of 
tooth movement, properties and bio- 
compatibility ( >f ( >rth( >d< >ntic materials 
and the physiology of facial musculature. 
ORTH 522. Orthodontics ( 1 ) 
ORTH 538. Orthodontics (2) 
ORTH 548. Orthodontics (2) 



Pediatric Dentistry 

Chairman: James T Rule 

Professors: Abrams, Rule. Wagner 

Clinical Professor: Kihn 

Research Professor: Bosnia 

Associate Professors: Josell, Kula, Minah, 

Owen, Shelton 
Clinical Associate Professors: Balis, L. S. 

Levin 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Ackerman, 

Canion, Coll, Ginsberg, Sanders 
The primary introduction to dentistry 
for children begins in the third year 
through didactic instruction and clinical 
experiences and continues during the 
fourth year of the dental program. The 
department also participates in lecture 
and laboratory projects presented in 
Basic Dental Science and Conjoint Sci- 
ences during the first two wars. Particu- 
lar attention is devoted to diagnosis and 
treatment planning, preventive dentistry 
procedures including fluoride therapy, 
non-punitive patient management tech- 
niques incorporating the use of psycho- 
pharmacologic agents, treatment of 
traumatic injuries to the primary and 
young permanent dentition, restorative 
procedures in primary teeth, pulpal 
therapy and interceptive orthodontics. 
Departmental educational goals are es- 
tablished enabling graduates to provide 
comprehensive dental care for the young 
patients while encouraging the develop- 
ment of a positive attitude toward dental 
care. 

Research efforts are devoted to the 
study of fluorides and their effect on 
dental materials, biological markers in 
tooth ring analysis and evaluation of 
therapeutic agents by means of clinical 
trials. 

PEDS 512. Pediatric Dentistry ( 1 ) 
PEDS 538. Pediatric Dentistry (8) 
PEDS 548. Pediatric Dentistry ( 6 ) 



Periodontics 

Chairman: John J. Bergquist 
Professors: Bergquist, G. Bowers, 

Hawley, Suzuki 
Clinical Professors: Halpert, Mellonig, 

Zupnik 
Associate Professors: Moffitt, Somerman 
Clinical Associate Professors: B. Lever. 

Plessett, Winson 
Assistant Professors: Krupa, Phillips, 

Serio 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Bosworth. 

Bowen, Feldman, Golski, Gray. Hayduk, 

Mandel, Sachs. Towle, Trail, Zeren 
Research Assistant Professor: Agarwal 
Clinical Instructors: Donahue, Felton, 

Mao, S. Park, Rosen 
Instructors: J. Bowers, Wilson 
Students are introduced to fundamental 
periodontics in lectures during the first 
and second years; clinical experience be- 
gins in the first year of the dental pro- 
gram. In the third year, students have 
didactic exposure to advanced periodon- 
tal procedures. Third- and fourth-year 
students enter into a learning contract 
that delineates a set of basic minimum 
clinical experiences. Interested students 
have the opportunity to choose from a 
broad range of additional experiences 
and to contract for both additional expe- 
riences and the grade the student feels 
these experiences warrant. Thus, the in- 
dividual student has substantial involve- 
ment in establishing his/her educational 
goals. 

The department conducts research in 
regenerative therapy, neutrophil chem- 
otaxis, genetics, chemotherapeutic 
agents, connective tissue metabolism, 
disease detection and education. 
PERI 518. Periodontics (2) 
PERI 522. Periodontics (1) 
PERI 538. Periodontics (11 ) 
PERI 548. Periodontics ( 11 ) 



16 




Pharmacology 

Chairman: Richard L. Wynn 

Research Professor: Rudo 

Associate Professors: Bergman, Crossley, 

Somerman, Thut, Wynn 
Research Assistant Professor: Vitek 
The program of instruction in pharma- 
cology is divided into three phases. The 
first phase includes a thorough study of 
basic concepts and principles in pharma- 
cology using mainly prototype drugs. 
Emphasis is placed on the mechanism of 
action of drugs, their absorption, dis- 
tribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity 
and drug interactions. The second phase 
deals with clinical aspects of oral and nu- 
tritional therapeutics and control of pain 
and anxiety. Special attention is given to 
clinically useful drugs, their indications 
and contraindications. The third phase, 
designed for graduate, continuing educa- 
tion and postdoctoral students, is an in- 
depth coverage of current topics in gen- 
eral pharmacology biotransformation of 
drugs, molecular pharmacology, pharma- 
cology of local and general anesthetics, 
and dental toxicology. 

The department conducts research in 
the development of analgesics, anes- 
thetics and skeletal muscle relaxants. 
DPHR 521. General Pharmacology and 

Therapeutics (5) 



Physiology 

Chairman: Leslie C. Costello 
Professors: Costello, Franklin 
Clinical Professor: Buxbaum 
Associate Professor: Myslinski 
Clinical Associate Professor: Hendler 
Assistant Professors: Bennett, Brunner, 

Myers, Urbaitis 
Clinical Assistant Professor: Iglarsh 
Visiting Research Assistant Professor: 

Staling 
The Department of Physiology offers 
both undergraduate and graduate pro- 
grams. The undergraduate course 
stresses the basic principles of physiol- 
ogy and provides the student with 
knowledge of the function of the princi- 
pal organ systems of the body. Dentally 
oriented aspects of physiology are taught 
through departmental participation in 
the Conjoint Sciences program. The de- 
partment also presents courses for grad- 
uate and postgraduate students and 
offers graduate programs leading to the 
masters and doctoral degrees and a 
combined D.DS./Ph.D. for students inter- 
ested in careers in teaching and 
research. 

The department conducts research 
and graduate training in oral neurophys- 
iology', cardiopulmonary physiology, en- 
docrinology and reproduction, and renal 
physiology. 
DPHS 512. Principles of Physiology (5) 



Removable Prosthodontics 

Chairman: Robert J. Leupold 
Professors: Leupold, Reese 
Clinical Professor: Ramsey 
Associate Professor: Stevens 
Dental School Associate Professors: 

Baer, Elias 
Clinical Associate Professor: Mort 
Assistant Professors: Eastwood, Faraone, 

Walters 
Clinical Assistant Professors: I. S. Fried, 

Schwartz, Weinman 
Clinical Instructors: Edler, Haro Ulloa, 

Kale, Linnan, Mittleman, Sheinberg, 

S. Siegel, Vail, Vera 
Removable prosthodontics concentrates 
on the art and science involved in re- 
placing lost dental and associated struc- 
tures by means of removable artificial 
appliances. These appliances are de- 
signed and constructed to restore and 
maintain function, appearance, speech, 
comfort, health and the self-image of the 
patient. Students receive didactic and 
laboratory instruction in removable 
prosthodontics in the second year and 
didactic instruction in the effective man- 
agement of clinical prosthodontic pro- 
cedures in the third year. In both clinical 
years they work under the guidance of 
staff members to provide clinical treat- 
ment for prosthodontic patients. 

The department conducts research in 
overdentures, implant dentures, vital 
pulpotomy and microbiological studies 
related to dentures and prosthetic labo- 
ratory asepsis. 

REMV 528. Removable Prosthodontics (6) 
REMV 538. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 
REMV 548. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 



r 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Cheryl T. Metzger 
Associate Professor: Everett 
Assistant Professors: Fried. Metzger, 

Parker, Rubinstein. Wooten 
Dental School Assistant Professor: Can 
Clinical Instructors: Frace, Ganssle, 

Horn, Peifley 
Academic Advisors: Carr ( Preprofes- 

sionaL Professional B.S. Program) 

Rubinstein (Degree Completion B.S. 

Program ) 

Metzger (Graduate Program) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Dental School offers both a Bach- 
elor of Science and a Master of Science 
degree in dental hygiene. The bac- 
calaureate degree can be earned in one 
of two educational programs: the Pre- 
professional/Professional Program and 
the Degree Completion Program. The 
objective of both baccalaureate auxiliary 
programs is to guide the students' de- 
velopment of the knowledge, skills, atti- 
tudes and values needed to assume 
positions of responsibility as dental aux- 
iliaries in a variety of health care, educa- 
tional, research and community settings. 
In addition, these programs are de- 
signed to provide a foundation for grad- 
uate study in dental hygiene or related 
disciplines. Information about the gradu- 
ate program in dental hygiene begins on 
page 24 

The dental hygienist is an auxiliary 
member of the dental health care team 
who strives to improve oral health by 
providing preventive and educational 
services to the public Clinical dental 
hygiene services include assessing pa- 
tients genera] and oral health status, re- 
moving deposits and stains from teeth. 




taking dental x-rays and applying fluo- 
rides and sealants. Educational and man- 
agement services for individuals and/or 
groups may include providing nutri- 
tional and oral hygiene counseling: con- 
ducting educational programs for 
members of the dental health team: and 
planning, implementing and evaluating 
community oral health programs. 
Employment Opportunities in Do/nil 
Hygiene. The majority of dental hygien- 
ists are employed in private dental 
( it'f u es. 1 1< iwever, there are increasing 
opportunities for those with baccalaure- 
ate anil graduate degrees in dental 
hygiene education: community, school 
and public health programs; private and 
public institutions; armed forces; re- 
search; and other special areas ol 
practice 

Current dental hygiene graduates, 
working full time, can anticipate initial 
annual income in the range of $20,000 to 
$25,000, depending on the area, respon- 
sibilities, type oi practice and general 
economic conditions 



PREPROFESSIONAL/ 
PROFESSIONAL 
BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

This program consists of two main parts: 
a two-year preprofessional curriculum at 
onu of the three University of Maryland 
campuses (College Park, Baltimore 
Count}' or Eastern Shore) or at another 
accredited college or university, and a 
two- or three-year professional curricu- 
lum at the Dental School. University of 
Maryland at Baltimore. 

Two-Year Preprofessional 
Curriculum 

A listing of the courses and credit hour 
requirements for the preprofessional 
curriculum follows. These courses pro- 
vide a foundation in basic sciences, so- 
cial sciences and general education. It is 
recommended that students meet with 
the dental hygiene advisor each semester 
to ensure appropriate course scheduling. 



COURSES 


English Composition 


6 


"Inorganic Chemistry 


4 


"Organic Chemistry 


4 


General Zoology or Biology 


4 


General Psychology 


3 


General Sociology 


3 


Public Speaking 


3 


*Human Anatomy and Physiology 


8 


*Microbiolog\' 


4 


Principles of Nutrition 


3 


■"Humanities 


6 


***Social Sciences 


6 


Statistics 


3 


Electives 


3 



00 



*These courses must include a laboratory 
and meet the requireynents for science ma- 
jors. Survey or tertniruil courses for non- 
science majors are not acceptable for 
transfer. 
** Humanities-. Courses must be selected 
from the following areas, literature, phi- 
losophy, history, fine arts, speech, math or 
language. 
***Social Sciences: General psychology and 
sociology are required; the remaining six 
credits should be selected from courses in 
psychology, sociology, computer science, 
government and politics, or anthropology. 

Application and Admission 
Procedures 

High school students who wish to enroll 
in the preprofessional curriculum 
should request applications directly 
from the admissions office of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742; the University of Maryland Bal- 
timore County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, 
Catonsville, Maryland 21228; or the 
University of Maryland Eastern Shore, 
Princess Anne, Maryland 21853; or any 
accredited college or university. 



It is recommended that those prepar- 
ing for a baccalaureate degree in dental 
hygiene pursue an academic program in 
high school which includes courses in 
biology, chemistry, algebra and social 
sciences. 

TWO- AND THREE-YEAR 
PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Two Year Professional 
Curriculum 

The professional curriculum includes 
clinical and didactic courses in the Den- 
tal School. Throughout these two years, 
dental hygiene students work concur- 
rently with dental students to provide 
patient care. 

During the first year, students expand 
upon their preprofessional basic science 
knowledge as it pertains to dental 
hygiene practice. In a clinical setting, the 
students begin to develop the skills, 
knowledge and judgment necessary to 
collect data for patient treatment; assess 
each patients oral health status; and se- 
lect and provide preventive and educa- 
tional services, based on the individual 
needs of the patient. 

During the second year, students 
demonstrate increasing proficiency and 
self-direction in assessing patients' oral 
health status, planning and providing 
preventive services and identifying the 
need for consultation and referral. To en- 
rich their educational experiences, stu- 
dents provide educational and/or clinical 
services in a variety of community set- 
tings, such as hospitals; schools; and fa- 
cilities for the handicapped, chronically 
ill and aged. They also have an oppor- 
tunity to work with dental students as 
primary providers for the physically dis- 
abled, mentally handicapped and indi- 
viduals with serious medical conditions 
or infectious diseases. Senior students 
also take courses in education, research 
and management which enable them 
to develop fundamental skills that are 
necessary for various career optic >ns 
within the profession. 



JUNIOR YEAR 


CREDIT 




Semester 1 


Prevention and Control of Oral 


9 


Disease I 




Oral Biology 


7 


Health Education Strategies 


2 




18 




Semester 2 


Prevention and Control of Oral 


7 


Diseases II 




Educational Program 


3 


Development 




Care and Management of the 


2 


Special Patient 




Methods and Materials in 


3 


Dentistry 




General Pharmacology and 


3 


Therapeutics 




Oral Radiology 


2 




20 


SENIOR YEAR 


CREDIT 



Advanced Clinical Practice I 
Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 

Practice I 
Community Service I 
Coqimunity Oral Health 
Health Care Management 



Advanced Clinical Practice II 
Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 

Practice II 
Community Service II 
Special Topics 

Issues in Health Care Delivery 
Introduction to Oral Health 
Research 



Semester 1 
5 
3 

1 
3 
3 

15 
Semester 2 



19 



Three-Year Professional 
Curriculum Option 

Although most students complete the 
professional curriculum in two years as 
outlined, a three-year professional cur- 
riculum option is offered. This three- 
year plan is a modification in the se- 
quence and number of professional 
courses taken each semester. This curric- 
ulum can be an attractive option for stu- 
dents who may wish to lighten their 
academic load due to family or work 
commitments: or for students who are 
otherwise eligible to enter at the junior 
level but have not yet successfully com- 
pleted all of the required preprofes- 
sional courses. Students admitted to this 
curriculum must have the recommenda- 
tion of the program advisor and approval 
of the admissions committee. 

Application and Admission 
Procedures 

College students enrolled in the pre- 
professional curriculum should commu- 
nicate regularly with the dental hygiene 
advisor at the Dental School to ensure 
that the courses selected satisfy- the de- 
gree requirements. After completion of 
two semesters of the preprofessional 
curriculum, students may request an ap- 
plication from the Office of Records and 
Registrations, 621 West Lombard Street, 
Room 326, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201; or 
from the dental hygiene advisor. Applica- 
tions for the Baltimore campus should 
be received no later than April 1 prior to 
the fall semester for which the student 
wishes to enroll. 



A minimum grade point average of 
2.3 in the preprofessional curriculum is 
recommended and preference will be 
given to those students who have high 
scholastic averages, especially in the 
science area. 

Enrollment at another University of 
Maryland campus or completion of the 
preprofessional curriculum does not 
guarantee admission to the professional 
curriculum at the Dental School. Enroll- 
ment in the dental hygiene program is 
limited. 

Students who are offered admission 
will be required to send a deposit of 
$100 with a letter of intent to enroll. This 
deposit will be credited toward tuition at 
registration, but will not be refunded in 
the event of failure to enroll. 

Projected Average Expenditures 

In addition to the expenses of tuition 
and fees which are listed on page 34, 
junior dental hygiene students should es- 
timate spending $945 on instruments, 
uniforms and supplies and $450 on text- 
books. Senior dental hygiene students 
should estimate spending $100 on instru- 
ments and supplies, $100 on textbooks 
and $325 on regional and national board 
examination fees. Field experience in 
both the junior and senior years may en- 
tail additional costs for travel and/or 
meals at sites outside the Dental School. 

Graduation Requirements 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science 
degree in dental hygiene must complete 
the preprofessional and the professional 
curricula as outlined. Students must 
achieve a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.0 and complete a total of 125 credits 
to be eligible for graduation. 

National and Regional Board 
Examinations 

Clinical and comprehensive written ex- 
aminations are given in the spring of the 
senior year. Successful completion of 
these exams is necessary to obtain a li- 

(.ense to practice dental hygiene. 



Courses 

DHYG 311. Prevention and Control of 
Oral Disease I (9). The study of the 
morphologic characteristics and phys- 
iologic relationships of teeth and sup- 
porting structures: and the basic 
foundation for clinical dental hygiene 
practice are presented in lectures, class 
discussions and audiovisual presenta- 
tions. Laboratory and clinical experi- 
ences provide the opportunity for 
practical application of the principles 
and procedures for the identification, 
prevention and control of oral diseases. 
DHYG 312. Oral Biology (7). The study 
of embryology and histology; anatomy 
and physiology; microbiology; pathology 
with emphasis on the head, neck and 
oral cavity; and the basic principles of ra- 
diology are presented in lecture, labora- 
tory and audiovisual format. 
DHYG 313. Health Education Strategies 
(2). The study of the elements of human 
behavior, principles of learning, methods 
of teaching and principles of communi- 
cation as they relate to teaching oral 
health care to individuals and groups 
Classroom discussions, small group ac- 
tivities and clinical experiences provide 
the opportunity for application of these 
topics. 

DHYG 321. Prevention and Control of 
Oral Diseases II (7). The study of princi- 
ples and procedures for the prevention 
of oral disease including dental health 
education, oral hygiene measures, die- 
tary control of dental disease, use of flu- 
orides, sealants and the oral prophylaxis; 
and continued study of the etiology anil 
control of periodontal disease and oral 
pathology are provided through class 
discussion and audiovisual and clinical 
experiences. Students work closely witli 
dental students to simulate the 
postgraduation team delivery of dental 
care. 



20 



DHYG 322. Community Oral Health 
(3). Methods of determining community 
oral health status, identifying barriers to 
optimum health, and selecting appropri- 
ate barrier interventions are presented 
concurrently with community program 
planning activities. Throughout the 
course, the role of the dental hygienist in 
community oral health is emphasized. 
DHYG 323. Care and Management of 
the Special Patient ( 2 ). Through class- 
room discussion, reading assignments, 
independent study, group projects and 
community involvement, the dental 
hygiene student will develop a philoso- 
phy for the care and management of spe- 
cial patients for whom routine care may 
be complicated by age or unusual health 
factors. 

DHYG 324. Methods and Materials in 
Dentistry (3). An introduction to the sci- 
ence of dental materials, including the 
composition and utilization of dental 
materials as they apply to clinical dental 
hygiene procedures, dental assisting and 
patient education, is presented in lec- 
ture, class discussion and laboratory 
format. 

DPHR 325. General Pharmacology and 
Oral Therapeutics (3). The study of 
drugs and their use in the treatment, di- 
agnosis and prevention of disease; the 
absorption, distribution, metabolism, ex- 
cretion and mechanism of action of 
drugs; and drug interactions, rationale 
for use, indications and contraindications 
are presented in lecture and class discus- 
sion format. Emphasis is placed on the 
relevance of this information to provid- 
ing patient care. 

DHYG 326. Oral Radiology (2). By 
means of lecture, laboratory and clinic 
activities, the students are introduced to 
the science of ionizing radiation; the 
production and effects of x-rays; and the 
various techniques of oral roentgenogra- 
phy Students gain experience exposing, 




processing, mounting, assessing the di- 
agnostic quality of and interpreting radi- 
ographs. The rationale and practices to 
insure radiation safety are stressed 
throughout the course. 
DHYG 411-421. Advanced Clinical Prac- 
tice I and II (5-4). Clinical experiences 
in principles and procedures of dental 
hygiene practice are provided in simu- 
lated general dentistry settings through a 
concurrent patient treatment program 
with dental students. Students have the 
opportunity to experience and partici- 
pate in alternative practice settings 
through block assignments to dental spe- 
cialty clinics within the school. 
DHYG 412. Perspectives of Dental 
Hygiene Practice 1(3). Senior students 
have the opportunity to explore ad- 
vanced principles and skills of dental 
hygiene practice. The primary focus of 
the course is divided into three maj< >r 
units: pain control, advanced periodon- 
tics and myo-oral facial pain. Also in- 
cluded in the course is an introduction 
to intra-oral photography and case docu- 
mentation. The emphasis of this course 
is to broaden the student's perspective of 
dental hygiene practice as it exists across 
the countrv. 



DHYG 413-423- Community Service I 
and II (1-1 ). The externship program 
provides opportunities for senior stu- 
dents to select experiences beyond those 
given within the Dental School setting. 
The selection of the community site is 
based on the students interests and ca- 
reer goals. Sites include well-baby 
clinics, prenatal clinics, community 
health centers, nursing homes, senior 
citizen centers, facilities for the handi- 
capped, hospitals, military clinics and 
schools, day care centers, public health 
department and research centers. 

DHYG 414. Educational Program De- 
velopment ( 3 )• Students in this course 
have the opportunity to explore various 
ways in which effective instructional 
skills may contribute to a career in den- 
tal hygiene. Learning experiences are de- 
signed to enable the student to develop 
these skills and to project their applica- 
tion in such areas as public school sys- 
tems, community health programs, 
higher education and consumer 
education. 



21 



1 n 



i 



v 



L_ 




**~\* 



DHYG 415. Health Care Management 
(3)- By means of lecture, discussion and 
small group activities, students are intro- 
duced to skills essential for effective 
health care management. Areas of em- 
phasis include women in management, 
managerial planning and decision mak- 
ing, fiscal control and grantsmanship. 
Management principles are applied to 
dental and other health care delivery 
settings. 

DHYG 422. Perspectives of Dental 
Hygiene Practice II (2). This course pro 
vides an application of principles and 
concepts for the planning and develop- 
ment oi the student's professional satis- 
faction and security. To prepare students 
for the challenge of professional career 
development, such issues as career plan- 
ning, continuing education, dental 
hygiene business practices and profes- 
sional organizations are included. 



DHYG 42-4. Special Topics ( 1 ). Students 
are provided an opportunity to pursue 
in-depth topics of special interest. The 
program of study is designed by each 
student and approved by faculty prior to 
the beginning of the course. The study 
program may relate to an area of interest 
in clinical dental hygiene, education, 
management or research and may con- 
sist of special reading assignments, re- 
ports, conferences, and possibly clinic. 
laboratory or extramural experience. 
DHYG 425. Issues in Health Care Deliv- 
ery (2). By means of lecture, discussion 
and small group activities, students ex- 
amine and analyze the issues that affect 
the broad spectrum of health care deliv- 
ery. Topics of interest include inequities 
in health care delivery, delivery systems 
in other countries, profiteering in health 
care delivery and professional rivalry. 
DHYG 426. Introduction to Oral Health 
Research (2). This course is designed 
to acquaint students with research 
methodology and its application to the 
dental hygiene profession. Emphasis will 
be placed upon: heightening student 
awareness of the need for dental hygiene 
research; developing student capabilities 
to identify research problems and design 
and execute meaningful research stud- 
ies; and enabling students to accurately 
appraise the quality of research reports. 



DEGREE COMPLETION 
BACCALEAUREATE PROGRAM 

The degree completion program pro- 
vides the opportunity for registered den 
tal hygienists who hold a certificate or 
associate degree to pursue studies lead- 
ing to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
dental hygiene. The curriculum is de- 
signed in two phases of full- or part-time 
study to meet each individuals academic, 
clinical and career interests. 

Program Requirements 

Phase I. General Requirements. Phase I 
consists of the students previous dental 
hygiene courses and general course re- 
quirements, totaling 91 semester credits. 
General course requirements for the 
baccalaureate degree may be taken at 
any one of the three University of Mary- 
land campuses (College Park, Baltimore 
County or Eastern Shore) or at another 
accredited college or university. These 
courses are listed in the Preprofessional 
Program, freshman and sophomore 
years. A maximum of 34 semester hours 
of transfer credits is granted for dental 
hygiene courses from an accredited pro- 
gram. To obtain transfer credit, students 
must attain a grade of C or better in all 
courses taken at an institution outside 
the Maryland state university system. 
Consultation with the completion pro- 
gram coordinator regarding transfer 
courses is recommended. 

Phase II: Degree Completion Require- 
ments. The degree completion program 
at the Dental School consists of two core 
seminars (DHYG 410, 420) totaling four 
credit hours; senior level didactic 
courses, totaling 14 credit hours (DHYG 
412, 414, 415, 424, 425 and 426); and 12 
credit hours of academic electives, gen- 
erally taken at another campus. A vari- 
able credit practicum course, DHYG 
418-428, may be taken for elective credit. 



11 



Curriculum Planning 

Registered dental hygienists should sub- 
mit to the degree completion program 
advisor transcripts from their dental 
hygiene program and all other institu- 
tions attended, so that transfer credits 
may be evaluated and a program de- 
veloped to satisfy remaining require- 
ments. Students should meet regularly 
with the advisor to ensure appropriate 
course scheduling in Phase I. 

Application and Admission 
Procedures 

In addition to meeting the general 
course requirements, the student apply- 
ing for admission to the degree com- 
pletion program at the Dental School 
must: 

1. Be a graduate of an accredited dental 
hygiene program; 

2. Have completed a minimum of one 
year of full- or part-time clinical prac- 
tice as a dental hygienist; 

3. Be licensed in at least one state. 
Applications for admission may be 

obtained from the Office of Records and 
Registrations, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore, 621 West Lombard Street, 
Room 326, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 
Applications should be received no later 
than April 1 prior to the fall semester for 
which the student wishes to enroll. 

Enrollment at another University of 
Maryland campus does not guarantee 
admission to the degree completion 
program at the Dental School. Enroll- 
ment in the degree completion program 
is limited. 




Students who are offered admission 
will be required to send a deposit of 
$100 with a letter of intent to enroll. This 
deposit will be credited toward tuition at 
registration, but will not be refunded in 
the event of failure to enroll. 

Student Expenses 

Projected tuition and fees are listed on 
page 34. The amounts given on pages 35- 
36 for instruments, supplies, uniforms 
and textbooks are not applicable for 
degree completion students. Costs in 
these categories would be considerably 
lower, with minimal expenses for in- 
struments and supplies. 

Graduation Requirements 

One hundred twenty-one (121) semester 
credit hours are required for the Bach- 
elor of Science degree in the degree 
completion dental hygiene program. The 
last 30 credit hours toward the bac- 
calaureate degree must be taken at the 
University of Maryland. Courses not of- 
fered at the Dental School will be taken 
at another University of Maryland 
campus. 



Courses 

See pages 21-22 for course descriptions 
of DHYG 412, 414, 415, 424, 425 and 426. 
DHYG 410-420. Seminar in Dental 
Hygiene (3-1) (degree completion 
only). Reinforcement, updating and ex- 
pansion of dental hygiene professional 
skills, knowledge and attitudes. Topic 
areas which are explored through semi- 
nar, laboratory and extramural formats 
include dental public health, preventive 
dentistry, process of dental hygiene care 
and options for dental hygiene practice. 
Emphasis is placed on developing oral 
and written communication skills neces- 
sary for the dental hygienist in a variety 
of health care, educational, research or 
community settings. 
DHYG 418-428. Dental Hygiene Prac- 
ticum (1-4/1-4)*. Individually designed 
didactic and/or clinical experiences in a 
special area of dental hygiene clinical 
practice, teaching, community dental 
health or research. 

*Elective variable credit course (bat 
requires approval of department 
chairperson. 



23 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 
PROGRAM 

The Master of Science degree program 
in dental hygiene is designed to prepare 
dental hygienists to assume positions of 
authority and responsibility beyond 
those assumed by the graduate with a 
baccalaureate degree and to provide a 
foundation for those who wish to pursue 
a doctoral degree. The program's ap- 
proach to learning is student-centered, 
individualized and flexible. The faculty is 
committed to facilitating the develop- 
ment of creative, thinking professionals 
who are capable of assessing and direct- 
ing their own performance. Self-evalua- 
tion and self-direction are encouraged 
throughout the program. Students have 
the opportunity to share their experi- 
ences, knowledge and skills, work coop- 
eratively with colleagues and explore a 
variety of resources to help them reach 
their maximum potential as health care 
professionals. 

Program concentrations include edu- 
cation, management and community/ 
institutional health. Students in the 
health concentration may choose to 
f( >cus ( >n acute/hospital care or chronic/ 
geriatric care. Within each concentration, 
practical career-oriented applications of 
knowledge and theory are emphasized. 



The Curriculum 

Full-time students can expect to com- 
plete the graduate program in 12 to 15 
months. Part-time students usually spend 
24 to 30 months in the program. Based 
on their career interests, students may 
select the thesis or the non-thesis option. 
Students in the thesis track must com- 
plete a total of 30 semester credits to 
graduate; those in the non-thesis track. 
34 credits. Under the guidance of a com- 
mittee, thesis students design, imple- 
ment, evaluate and orally defend a 
research project for a total of six credits 
of masters thesis. Non-thesis students, 
under the guidance of primary and sec- 
ondary readers, submit and defend a 
scholarly paper. Students selecting the 
non-thesis option are required to gain 
applied research experience by partici- 
pating in an established or developing 
research project. 







Non- 


DENTAL HYGIENE CORE 


Thesis 


Thesis 


REQUIREMENTS 


Option 


Option 



Educational Program 3 3 

Development 
Health Care Management 3 3 

Literature Review and 3 3 

Evaluation for Dental 

Hygienists 
Research Design and 3 3 

Methodology 
Area of Concentration 3 3 

Practicum 
Master's Thesis/Research or 6 3 

Research Practicum 
Electives 9 16 

Total 30 3-4 

Electives 

Electives may be chosen from the 
courses offered by the schools and de- 
partments at any of the three University 
of Maryland campuses in Baltimore, Bal- 
timore County and College Park. F.lec- 
tives that apply to the concentrations of 
teaching, management and community 
institutional health must be approved by 
the student's faculty advisor prior to 
registration. 



Expenses and Financial 
Assistance 

Tuition is $108 per credit hour for in- 
state residents and $192 per credit hour 
for non-residents. Additional fees are 
charged for some student services, Fi- 
nancial aid, in the form of loans, grants 
and work study is awarded on the basis 
of demonstrated need. A limited number 
of part-time graduate teaching positions 
are available through the department, 
and university fellowships are available 
from the graduate school. Part-time em- 
ployment opportunities for dental 
hygiene practice are excellent in the 
community. 

Admission and Application 
Procedures 

Admission to graduate study is the exclu- 
sive responsibility of the University of 
Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore. 
The minimum standard for admission is 
a B average, or 30 on a 4.0 scale, as an 
undergraduate student in a program of 
study leading to a baccalaureate degree. 
Students who fail to meet these mini- 
mum requirements may be admitted to 
graduate study as provisional students. 
Applicants must be graduates of an ac- 
credited program in dental hygiene and 
possess a baccalaureate degree in dental 
hygiene or a related field. A personal in- 
terview with the program director is rec- 
ommended but not required. 

Three copies of the application for 
admission, three letters of recommenda- 
tion and two sets of official transcripts 
from each college or university attended 
must be received by the University of 
Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore, by 
July 1 for admission in the fall semester; 
by December 1 tor admission in the 
spring semester; and by May 15 for ad- 
mission in the summer semester 



24 



Core Courses 

DHYG 414. Educational Program De- 
velopment (3). Students explore ways in 
which effective instructional skills may 
be used by dental hygienists in such 
areas as public school systems, commu- 
nity health programs, higher education 
and consumer education. 
DHYG 415. Health Care Management 
(3). Through lecture, discussion and 
small group activities, students are intro- 
duced to skills essential for effective 
health care management. Areas of em- 
phasis include women in management, 
managerial planning and decision mak- 
ing, fiscal control and grantsmanship. 
Management principles are applied to 
dental and other health care delivery 
settings. 

DHYG 601. Seminar: Literature Review 
and Evaluation for Dental Hygienists 
(3). Through an analysis and critique of 
literature pertinent to the dental hygien- 
ist, students examine biological and 
clinical, research and political, sociologi- 
cal and educational trends that influence 
dental hygiene. Unanswered research 
questions are identified. 
DHYG 619. Teaching Practicum (2-4). 
Graduate students, working with a fac- 
ulty advisor, gain experience teaching in 
didactic, clinical and/or laboratory set- 
tings. An analytical approach to teaching 
effectiveness is emphasized. Placements 
in junior colleges, baccalaureate pro- 
grams, elementary or secondary schools 
or the Dental School are arranged ac- 
cording to each students career goals. 







DHYG 629. Health Care Management 
Practicum (2-4 ). In cooperation with a 
faculty advisor, graduate students ob- 
serve and participate in the administra- 
tive activities of a health care program. 
Placements are arranged to support the 
students career goals. 
DHYG 639. Advanced Clinical Practice 
Practicum (2-4). Graduate students 
work with a faculty advisor to gain 
knowledge and experience in an ad- 
vanced clinical area of dental hygiene 
practice, such as nutritional analysis 
and counseling, oro myofacial pain, 
periodontics or orthodontics. 
DHYG 649. Research Practicum (2-4). 
Graduate students, working in conjunc- 
tion with a faculty advisor, gain ex- 
perience in research design and 
implementation by participating in an 
on-going research project of interest to 
the student. Scientific writing experience 
will be included. 



DHYG 799. Master's Thesis Research (6 ). 
NURS 701. Research Methods and Mate- 
rials (3). In one four-hour lecture/lab a 
week, basic understanding of the phi- 
losophy of research, the nature of scien- 
tific thinking and methods of research 
study are taught. Prerequisite.- Basic 
Statistics. 



25 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 



GRADUATE EDUCATION 

Graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy I Ph.D.) degrees are offered by the 
Departments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, 
Microbiology, Oral Pathology and Physi- 
ology. Master of Science degrees are also 
offered by the Department of Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery and by the Depart- 
ment of Dental Hygiene. The most re- 
cent addition to the Dental School's 
graduate program is a combined D.D.S./ 
Ph.D. in physiology, the purpose of 
which is to train students to become 
dental researchers for careers in aca- 
demic dentistry. 

Programs are also available for those 
who wish to pursue a graduate degree in 
one of the basic sciences concurrently 
with clinic specialty education. The com- 
bined degree/specialty training program 
generally requires three years for the 
masters degree and five years for the 
doctorate. These programs are highly in- 
dividualized and are developed appro- 
priate to the needs of the candidate. 

A Master of Science in oral biology 
program is available for graduate stu- 
dents who are enrolled in the certificate 
programs in the Dental School or any 
persons holding a D.D.S. . D.M.D. or 
equivalent degree. The program is a 
multidisciplinary one, in that the gradu- 
ate courses necessary to satisfy the re- 
quirements of the l fniversity of Maryland 
Graduate School. Baltimore for the mas- 
ters degree are selected from the 
various departments of the university. 
Students receive training under the su- 
pervision and direction of a member of 
the graduate faculty. Courses in educa- 
tion haw been added to various tracks 
equipping students to become more ef- 
fective teachers of their specialties. 

The graduate school catalog and ap- 
plication for admission may be obtained 
from the University of Maryland Gradu- 
ate School, Baltimore. StUl Wilkens 
\\cnuc. Baltimore, Maryland 21228. 



ADVANCED DENTAL 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

In Pro, when the Dental School moved 
into its modern facilities, a comprehen- 
sive advanced dental education program 
was initiated. Over the last two decades, 
the program has continued to evolve to 
meet the demands of the profession. 
Currently, the school offers the following 
advanced dental education programs: 

Advanced General Dentistry, a one- 
year residency program of dental school- 
based advanced study and practice. 

General Practice Residency, a one 
year program of hospital-based advanced 
study and dental practice. 

Advanced Education Programs de- 
signed to provide successful candidates 
eligibility for examination by the appro- 
priate specialty boards under the Com- 
mission on Dental Accreditation of the 
American Dental Association. Programs 
of 24 months each are offered in the 
following disciplines: endodontics, 
pediatric dentistry, periodontics and 
prosthodontics. A program of 36 months' 
duration is offered in orthodontics. The 
oral and maxillofacial surgery program 
extends over a period of 48 months and 
also provides the opportunity for ma- 
triculation in a combined certificate- 
degree course of study. 

Qualified applicants for two-year cer- 
tificate programs may seek dual enroll- 
ment as candidates in combined 
certificate' degree programs. Successful 
candidates are awarded a certificate of 
proficiency in a clinical specialty by the 
Dental School and the degree Master of 
Science by the University of Maryland 
Graduate School, Baltimore. 

Applicants for all programs must 
have a D.D.S.. D.M.D. or equivalent de- 
gree aikl must give evidence of high 
scholastic standing. Questions about in- 
dividual programs, tuition, fee schedules 
and application forms should be directed 
to the Office of Admissions and Recruit- 
ment, Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Dental School. University ol 
Maryland, 666 West Baltimore street, 
Baltimore. Maryland 21201. 



PROFESSIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 

The Dental School offers an integrated 
professional development curriculum 
for health care professionals and faculty 
members. The program activities are de- 
signed to update, refresh and reinforce 
the professional knowledge and skill of 
the practitioner. The clinical, biological, 
social and behavioral sciences related to 
practice are included in the course offer- 
ings. These courses are conducted by 
the school's faculty, visiting faculty and 
distinguished practitioners from all sec- 
tions of the country. Professional de- 
velopment courses are not intended as 
collegiate credit courses: however, the 
Continuing Education Unit (CEU), which 
equals ten clock hours of formal instruc- 
tion, is 4 measurement used to verify at- 
tendance and participation in these 
activities. 

Clinical and laboratory facilities and a 
spacious classroom specifically designed 
and equipped for the Center for Profes- 
sional Development are available for 
courses held at the school. Off-campus 
courses are also provided for practi- 
tioners located in rural areas of the state. 

A significant number of the on- 
campus courses are laboratory or clini- 
cal participation courses. The availability 
of faculty expertise and facilities of a uni- 
versity-based professional development 
program offers many advantages to the 
practitioners and to students who are en- 
couraged to attend professional develop- 
ment courses. 



26 



STUDENT LIFE 



STUDENT SERVICES 

Office of Academic Affairs 

The Office of Academic Affairs, under 
the direction of the associate dean for ac- 
ademic and student affairs, is the source 
of student information about the aca- 
demic program and is the repository for 
records of student academic perfor- 
mance. The policy of the University of 
Maryland regarding access to and release 
of student data/information may be 
found in the current UMAB Student 
Handbook issued to all incoming 
students. 

A major function of the office is to 
coordinate the academic counseling and 
guidance programs of the school. De- 
partmental academic counseling and 
progress reports are maintained and 
monitored. Records concerning counsel- 
ing, referrals and disposition are main- 
tained and serve as a resource for 
academic evaluation by the faculty and 
administration. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, ex- 
amination schedules and the academic 
calendar are disseminated through this 
office. Program information distributed 
to students includes handouts about the 
grading system, course credits, and 
guidelines for the selection of students 
for clerkship programs. 

Official class rosters and student per- 
sonal data and address files are main- 
tained by the Office of Academic Affairs, 
which serves as a liaison between the 
Dental School and the university regis- 
trar for the coordination of registration 
procedures. 

The office is also responsible for co- 
ordination of a computerized grading 
system which (a) provides each advance- 
ment committee with a composite report 
on all students in the class at the end of 
each semester; (b) provides, on request, 
class rankings and other evaluation data; 




and (c) operates in conjunction with the 
university's Office of Records and Regis- 
trations, which generates and distributes 
individual grade reports, maintains the 
students permanent record and issues 
the official transcript. 

Office of Clinical Affairs 

All intramural and extramural clinical 
programs of the Dental School are coor- 
dinated by the Office of Clinical Affairs. 
Major functions of this office include co- 
ordinating the schedules of faculty from 
the various disciplines to each general 
practice clinic, scheduling the rotation of 
students to special assignments, assign- 
ing patients to students, maintaining 
patient records, and assuming respon- 
sibility for quality assurance and clinical 
information management. 

Patient visits to the clinics of the Den- 
tal School exceed 100,000 annually. 
Through the Office of Clinical Affairs, as- 
sistance is provided to students and pa- 
tients who encounter difficulties in the 
clinics. The personnel, supplies, equip- 
ment and collection of fees associated 
with the operation of the teaching clinics 
are additional responsibilities coordi- 
nated through this office. 



Office of Student Affairs 

The Office of Student Affairs is either di- 
rectly or indirectly involved with all as- 
pects of student life and welfare at the 
Dental School. Primary areas of respon- 
sibility include personal and career 
counseling and student advisory 
services. 

Students who experience career, 
health, legal, employment, housing and 
other personal problems are counseled 
by the assistant dean for student affairs 
and referred, as necessary, to the appro- 
priate campus agency or office. In addi- 
tion, counseling concerning specialty 
training, military service, internships, 
dental education and dental research ca- 
reers is available to undergraduate den- 
tal and dental hygiene students through 
the Center for Career Development and 
Placement. 

The assistant dean for student affairs 
serves as advisor to all student organiza- 
tions and publications and also assists in 



27 




the coordination of joint student-faculty 
programs ( professional, social and 
cultural). The Student Affairs Committee 
of the Faculty Council has the major re- 
sponsibility for such programs. 

To effectively conduct all student af- 
fairs, the Office of Student Affairs main- 
tains direct liaison with administrators, 
as well as campus, community and pro- 
fessional organizations and agencies. 

Student and Employee Health 

The school provides medical care for its 
students through the office of Student 
and Employee Health, located on the 
first floor of the University of Maryland 
Professional Building, 419 West Redwood 
Street Coverage is provided around-the- 
clock by family physicians and nurse 
practitioners. Students are seen by ap- 
pointment or on an emergency basis 
by calling 328-6790. For a yearly fee, 
students are entitled to the services of 
Student and Employee Health, which is 
able to care for a large variety of stu- 
dents' health needs. Counseling services 
are also available. 



Housing 

Two campus housing facilities offer a 
variety of living styles on the I'MAB 
campus: Pascault Row, a new, fully fur- 
nished unique apartment complex 
converted from early 19th century 
rowhouses, offers space for 178 students, 
and dormitory style living is available in 
the Baltimore Student Union. The major- 
ity of students, however, live off campus. 
For them the Off-Campus Housing Ser- 
vice offers a catalog of available rooms 
and apartments listed by both students 
and rental agents and a roommate refer- 
ral service For information concerning 
housing, contact the Division of Resi- 
dence Life, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore, 621 West Lombard Street, 
Baltimore. Maryland 21201. 

Athletic Facilities 

The Athletic Center at I'MAB is located 
on the tenth floor of the Pratt Street 
Garage. The facility is equipped with two 
squash courts, two racquetball handball 
courts and two basketball courts which 
may also be used for volleyball. In addi- 
tion, there is a weight room with a 1^ 
station universal gym, single station uni- 
versal units, stationary bikes and rowing 



machines. Both mens and women's 
locker rooms are equipped with saunas. 

Mens basketball, co-ed intramural 
basketball and volleyball teams compete 
throughout the fall and spring semesters. 
The Athletic Center also sponsors squash 
and racquetball tournaments. IM\B stu- 
dents with a current and valid I.D. are 
admitted free. For additional informa- 
tion, contact the athletic manager at 
328-3902. 

The Baltimore Student Union 

The Baltimore Student Union serves as a 
cultural and social center for students, 
faculty, staff, alumni and guests. Activities 
hosted by the union include meetings, 
dances, movies and special events. The 
multi-purpose Baltimore Student Union 
houses the campus offices of Student Fi- 
nancial Aid, Records and Registrations, 
Student Services, Residence Life and the 
Student Government Association. The 
Synapse (or Pub), university bookstore, 
meeting rooms, lounge space and dormi- 
tory facilities are also located in the 
union. 

STUDENT POLICIES 

Student Judicial Policy 

Statement of Ethical Principles, Practices, 

and Behaviors 

• Each member of this community is ob- 
liged to carry out his or her desig- 
nated responsibilities within the rules 
and governance structure adopted and 
agreed to by the community as a 
whole. 

• Faculty and students should be con- 
cerned with their own competence 
and strive to improve themselves in 
the integration and transmission of 
knowledge. 



28 



In contributing to the information 

base of the sciences, whether verbally 
or by written communication, students 
and faculty should present data, inter- 
pretations of data, and other facets < if 
scholarly discovery with honesty and 
integrity. 

Professional relations among all mem- 
bers of the community should be 
marked by civility. Thus, scholarly con- 
tributions should be acknowledged, 
slanderous comments and acts should 
be expunged, and each person should 
recognize and facilitate the contribu- 
tions of others to this community. 
Each member of the community, when 
acting as an evaluator of any other 
member, should recognize unprofes- 
sional personal bias and eliminate its 
effect on the evaluation. 
The validity of evaluation shall not be 
compromised by any departure from 
the published and/or generally under- 
stood rules of conduct. Thus, all man- 
ner of cheating on examinations or the 
presentation of work assumed to be 
one's own but done by another are 
unacceptable behaviors. 
An individual may challenge or refuse 
to comply with a directive whose im- 
plementation would not be in keeping 
with generally held ethical principles. 
An individual should report his or her 
limitation of knowledge or experience 
if either limitation is likely to compro- 
mise an effort or expected result. 
Faculty and students should seek con- 
sultation whenever it appears that the 
quality of professional service may be 
enhanced thereby. 

Students should seek consultation and 
supervision whenever their care of a 
patient may be compromised because 
i >f lack of knowledge and/or 
experience. 

Students and faculty must merit the 
confidence of patients entrusted to 
their care, rendering to each a full 
measure of service and devotion. 



• All patients should be treated with dig- 
nity and respect. 

• An individual or group of individuals 
should not abuse their power by ex- 
tending it beyond its defined or gener- 
al ly accepted limits. 

• To the extent practical, sanctions for 
violations of these principles shall af- 
fect only individuals found to have 
committed the violations and shall not 
affect other persons. 

Professional Code of Conduct 
This academic community has interre- 
lated responsibilities of producing and 
disseminating new scientific knowledge, 
teaching, caring for patients, and educat- 
ing individuals to carry on these same 
functions. In carrying out these responsi- 
bilities, the academic community needs 
rules to guide the maintenance of high 
standards. These must be nurtured by 
individuals with a developed sense of 
honor, integrity and intellectual honesty. 
It is incumbent upon the academic com- 
munity to provide an environment 
which fosters these attributes in students 
and faculty members. 

It is important that faculty and stu- 
dents in a health profession realize that 
in our society the health practitioner 




functions mainly on the basis of self-dis- 
cipline, rather than on imposed regula- 
tion, and receives a high degree of 
public confidence and trust. By accept- 
ing a Professional Code of Conduct, 
which represents this trust, the faculty 
member and student demonstrate the 
desire to be fully prepared for the obli- 
gation to the dental profession and to 
the people served. As is traditionally ex- 
pected of all health professionals, faculty 
members and students will demonstrate 
the highest standards of integrity at all 
times. Faculty and students are expected 
at all times to conduct themselves in ac- 
cordance with all codes, rules and reg- 
ulations of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore. 
Student Offenses of the Professional Code 
of Conduct 

The following behaviors, while not all- 
inclusive, are examples of student of- 
fenses of the Professional Code of 
Conduct: 

• Unprofessional conduct. This includes 
all forms of conduct which fail to meet 
the standards of the dental profession, 
such as lack of personal cleanliness, 
use of abusive language or behavior in 
the presence of a patient or faculty 
member, disruption of class or any 
other school activity, and violation of 
the Dental School dress code. 

• Academic misconduct. This includes 
all forms of student academic miscon- 
duct including, but not limited to, pla- 
giarism, cheating on examinations, 
violation of examination procedures, 
and submitting work for evaluation 
that is not ones own effort. 



29 



• Dishonest}-. This includes knowingly 
furnishing false information through 
forgery, alteration or misuse of docu- 
ments or records with intent to de- 
ceive; presenting written or oral 
statements known to be false; loaning, 
transferring, altering or otherwise mis- 
using university identification 
materials 

• Theft or destruction of property. This 
includes unauthorized possession or 
receiving of property that does not be- 
long to you, such as instruments and 
books, or destruction of property not 
belonging to you. 

• Forcible entry into university facilities. 

• Intentional infliction or threat of 
bodily harm. 

• Possession of drugs or dangerous 
weapons. 

• Aiding or abetting. This includes con- 
spiring with or knowingly aiding or 
abetting another person to engage in 
any unacceptable activity. 

• Violation of any codes, rules and reg- 
ulations of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore. 

The sections of the Student Judicial 
Policy included in this bulletin are in- 
tended to provide examples of the high 
standards of conduct expected of a pro- 
fessional and the offenses against these 
standards. The remaining sections of the 
policy describe specific examination 
procedures and procedures for consid- 
ering infractions against the Professional 
( '.( )de ( >f Conduct. The Student Judicial 
Policy in its entirety is sent to each 
admitted student. Acceptance to the 
Dental School is contingent upon the 
understanding and acceptance of the 
tenets contained in the Student Judicial 
Policy and Professional Code of Conduct 
All incoming dental and dental hygiene 
students will be examined on this policy 
as part of their orientation week activities. 




e 



Personal Cleanliness/General 
Dress Regulations 

The overall appearance of the health 
care provider should be one of neatness 
and cleanliness. The purpose of this 
standard of appearance is to enhance the 
patient-provider relationship, to main- 
tain clinical asepsis and to foster a favor- 
able public image of this institution. 

These regulations apply to all dental 
and dental hygiene students, advanced 
dental education students, faculty and 
staff. 

• In all patient-care areas, men will w-ear 
clean, neat slacks, clinic jacket and a 
collared shirt and tie. Women will 
wear a clinic jacket over dress clothes. 
If a short sleeve clinic jacket is worn, 
either a short sleeve shirt or blouse 
should be worn or sleeves should be 
rolled above the elbows. Informal at- 
tire such as denim jeans or athletic 
shoes will not be worn in patient-care 
areas. 

• It is not appropriate for students or 
faculty to wear their clinic jackets off 
campus except in patient-provider and 
other professional circumstances. 

• Surgical scrub shirts are to be worn 
only in Oral Surgery or during the 
pei !< trmance ol spec ialty surgery. 



y 





• The above regulations apply in all clin- 
ical areas in Hayden-Harris Hall and af- 
filiation sites where patient care is 
being delivered or areas reserved for 
patient care between the hours of 
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. 
The primary responsibility for com- 
plying with these regulations rests with 
the individual. Students in violation of 
these regulations will be dismissed from 
the laboratory, clinical area and or lec- 
ture room by the supervising faculty 
member! s) until these regulations have 
been met. Faculty will ensure that these 
guidelines are complied with and en- 
forced. Subsequent violations of these 
regulations by a given student will be 
forwarded to the Judicial Board. 



JO 



PUBLICATIONS/ 
ORGANIZATIONS/AWARDS 

Publications 

Dental School and campus publications 
include the semi-annual Forum, a maga- 
zine focusing on new developments and 
techniques in the practice of dentistry 
and on the school's educational and re- 
search programs; The VOICE, published 
bi-monthly; and the annual UMAB Stu- 
dent Handbook. In addition, the Office 
of Academic Affairs publishes a Dental 
Student Handbook for distribution to in- 
coming dental students. These publica- 
tions are distributed free of charge. 

Student publications include a year- 
book. The MIRROR, published annually 
by student editors and staff; a student 
newspaper, The Maryland Probe, pub- 
lished quarterly; and each year the Stu- 
dent Dental Association compiles and 
distributes a student directory. 

Organizations 

The Student Dental Association (SDA) is 

the organizational structure of the stu- 
dent body. The association is presided 
over and governed by elected represen- 
tatives from all classes and is repre- 
sented on selected committees of the 
Faculty Council. The organization partici- 
pates in certain student-faculty activities 
and sponsors and directs all student so- 
cial activities. It is responsible for the 
publication of the schools yearbook, The 
MIRROR, and student newspaper, The 
Maryland Probe, and is unique among 
dental student organizations in having 
formulated its own constitution and pro- 
fessional code of ethics. 

The American Student Dental Asso- 
ciation (ASDA) was established in Feb- 
ruary 1971, with the aid of the American 
Dental Association (ADA). Its primary 
purposes are to secure scholarships and 
loans and to assist in other student- 
related affairs. Included in the ASDA 
membership is a subscription to the ADA 
Journal. 



Student American Dental Hygienists' 
Association (SADHA) members are in- 
volved in activities such as hosting guest 
speakers, conducting fund-raising proj- 
ects, presenting table clinics and main- 
taining liaison with the state and local 
organizations. They also participate in 
meetings and discussion groups on a 
regional and national level. Student rep- 
resentatives attend the annual meeting of 
the American Dental Hygienists' 
Association. 

The Student National Dental Associa- 
tion (SNDA), Maryland chapter, was 
founded in 1973- The primary objective 
of this organization is to foster the ad- 
mission, development and graduation of 
black dental and dental hygiene students. 
Among the activities in which the Mary- 
land chapter is engaged are minority 
recruitment, tutoring, social and 
professional programs, and community 
and university relations. 

The American Association of Dental 
Research Student Research Group was 
founded in 1987. The objectives of the 
local chapter are to promote student re- 
search in dentistry and its related disci- 
plines, to promote the advancement of 
dental research and related aspects, and 
to further the aims and objectives of the 
American Association of Dental Research 
(AADR) and International Association of 
Dental Research (IADR) as they relate to 
student research. Membership is open to 
all dental and dental hygiene students 
expressing an interest in dental research. 
Past research experience is not a re- 
quirement for membership. 

The American Association of Dental 
Schools (AADS) promotes the advance- 
ment of dental education, research and 
service in all appropriately accredited in- 
stitutions that offer programs for dental 
personnel. The association has three 
membership categories: institutional, in- 
dividual and student. Student members 
receive the Journal of Dental Education 
and the Dental Student News, published 
by the association. During the year the 
local chapter conducts programs to pro- 
mote the goals of this organization. 
Three Dental School student represen- 
tatives ( two dental and one dental 
hygiene) are elected to serve on the 
Council of Students of the American 
Association of Dental Schools. 



The Gamma Pi Delta Prosthodontic 
Honorary Society, chartered in 1965, is 
an honorary student dental organization 
with scholarship and interest in the field 
of prosthetic dentistry as a basis for ad- 
mission. The objective of the organiza- 
tion is the advancement of prosthetic 
dentistry through lectures, table clinics 
and other academic activities which will 
stimulate the creative interest of students 
and the profession in general. 

The Gorgas Odontological Honorary 
Society was organized in 1916 as an hon- 
orary student dental society with schol- 
arship as a basis for admission. The 
society was named after Dr. Ferdinand 
J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental educa- 
tion, a teacher of many years experience 
and a major contributor to dental litera- 
ture. It was with the idea of perpetuating 
his name that the society chose its title. 

To be eligible for membership a stu- 
dent must rank in the top one-third of 
his class, must have achieved and main- 
tained a minimum grade point average 
of 3.00 in all combined courses and 
must not have repeated for scholastic 
reasons any subject. Speakers prominent 
in the dental and medical fields are in- 
vited to address members at monthly 
meetings. An effort is made to obtain 
speakers not affiliated with the 
university. 

The Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon, national honorary dental society, 
was chartered at the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery during the 1928-29 
academic year. Students whose rank for 
the entire course of study is among the 
highest 20 percent of the class are eligi- 
ble. This high honor is conferred upon 
those seniors who, in addition to schol- 
arship, have demonstrated exemplary 
character traits and potential for future 
professional growth and attainment. 



31 



The Academy of General Dentistry 

membership is open to all students in 
the Dental School. General dentists 
share extraordinary experiences in lec- 
ture-discussion programs of interest to 
all. Meetings are held several times a 
year after school hours. 

The American Association of Women 
Dentists was founded nationally in 1921. 
The Maryland student chapter, founded 
in 1982, provides support and informa- 
tion locally to women dental students at- 
tending the Dental School. Lectures, 
group discussions, projects and gather- 
ings with practitioners and AAWD chap- 
ters from other dental schools form the 
basis of the group's activities. 

The American Society of Dentistry 
for Children meets once a month and 
uses a lecture-discussion format to dis- 
cuss subjects as varied as nutrition for 
children to \\0 in private practice. All 
students are welcome to join. 

The Big Brother/Sister Program is a 
voluntary effort on the part of each 
member of the sophomore class to help 
and advise a member of the incoming 
freshman class. It is hoped that this as- 
sistance will continue through gradua- 
tion of each class. The program has been 
made an official standing committee of 
the SDA. 

The Dental Hygiene Big Brother/ 
Sister Program is a voluntary effort on 
the part of each member of the senior 
class to help and advise a member of 
the junior class. It is hoped that this 
assistance will continue through 
graduation of each class. 



Students Supporting Students is a 
group of students available to help other 
students having difficulty coping with 
dental school. These students have taken 
an interest in learning how to help oth- 
ers with various types of problems fre- 
quently experienced by dental and 
dental hygiene students. This group can 
provide peer support, referral, guided 
assistance and information related to 
student problems. 

Professional dental fraternities are 
Greek letter organizations of men and 
women bonded together by ritual. They 
are specialized fraternities which limit 
membership to selected graduates and 
students enrolled and satisfactorily pur- 
suing courses in an accredited college of 
dentistry. They are not honorary frater- 
nities or recognition societies which 
confer membership to recognize out- 
standing scholarship. Their aims are to 
promote the high ideals and standards 
of the profession, advance professional 
knowledge and welfare of members, 
and provide a medium through which 
members, with a common interest, can 
develop everlasting friendships. 
Representative chapters in the Dental 
School are Alpha Omega, founded in 
19(F; Psi Omega, founded in 1892; and Xi 
Psi Phi, founded in 1889. 

Awards 

Awards are presented to senior students 
at graduation to recognize the following 
achievements and qualities: 
Dentistry 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the ten 
highest in the class 

• highest average in basic biologic- 
sciences 

• highest average in basic dental science 

• ethical standards, kindness and 
humanitarianism 

• professional demeanor 

• devotion to the school and the 
pr< >fession 

• characteristics of an outstanding gen- 
eral practitioner 

• the most professional growth and 
development 



• conscientious and enthusiastic devo- 
tion to clinical practice 

• high proficiency in clinical care and 
patient management 

• greatest proficiency in oral and max- 
illofacial surgery 

• excellence in fixed partial prosthesis 

• excellence in complete oral operative 
restoration 

• excellence in practical set of full upper 
and lower dentures 

• outstanding senior thesis/table clinic 

• research achievement 

• achievement, proficiency- and/or poten- 
tial in each of the following disciplines 
or specialty areas: 

anatomy 
anesthesiology 
basic dental science 
dental materials 
' dentistry for children 
dentistry for the handicapped 
dental radiology 
endodontics 
geriatric dentistry 
gold foil operation 
operative dentistry 
oral health care delivery 
oral medicine 
oral pathology- 
oral and maxillofacial surgery 
orthodontics 
periodontology 
removable prosthodontics 
Dental Hygiene 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the five 
highest in the class 

• humanitarianism. ethical standards and 
devotion to the profession 

• interest in and potential for active par- 
ticipation in professional organizations 

• interest and participation in the Stu- 
dent American Dental Hygienists' 
Association 

• outstanding clinical performance 

• outstanding leadership and participa- 
tion in community activities and stu- 
dent and professional organizations 



^ 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

To attend classes students are required 
to register each term in accordance with 
current registration procedures. Fees are 
due and payable on the dates specified 
for registration. Registration is not com- 
pleted until all financial obligations are 
satisfied. Students who do not complete 
their registration and pay tuition and all 
fees will not be permitted to attend 
classes. A fee will be charged for late 
registration. 

Although the university regularly 
mails bills to advance registered stu- 
dents, it cannot assume responsibility for 
their receipt. If any student does not re- 
ceive a bill prior to the beginning of a 
semester in which he/she has advance 
registered, it is the students responsi- 
bility to contact the registrars office or 
cashiers office during normal business 
hours. 

All checks and money orders should 
be made payable to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount of the 
actual bill. 

No diploma, certificate or transcript 
of record will be issued to a student who 
has not made satisfactory settlement of 
his university account. 

DETERMINATION OF 
IN-STATE STATUS 

An initial determination of in-state status 
for admission, tuition and charge- 
differential purposes will be made by 
the university at the time a students ap- 
plication for admission is under consid- 
eration. The determination made at that 





time, and any determination made there- 
after, shall prevail in each semester until 
the determination is successfully 
challenged. 

Students classified as in-state for ad- 
mission, tuition and charge-differential 
purposes are responsible for notifying 
the Office of Records and Registrations, 
in writing, within 15 days of any change 
in their circumstances which might in 
any way affect their classification at 
UMAB. 

The determination of in-state status 
for admission, tuition and charge- 
differential purposes is the responsi- 
bility of the campus Office of Records 
and Registrations. A student may request 



a re -evaluation of this status by filing a 
petition (available in Room 326 of the 
Baltimore Student Union). Copies of the 
university's policy are available in the 
records office and in the deans office. 



33 



1988-89 PROJECTED TUITION 


l^T ~~ 


r k 


■^ 


AND FEES 






L^^M^ & ■ 


> 




Dental Program 






If, 


m 


■ 




Per 


Per 






Semester 


leu 


' V 


) 




Matriculation ( new 


$ 25 


$ 25 






students p 






,, ^w 






Tuition ( fixed charges) 










In-state 


2,800 


5,600 


<fc< / 






Out-of-state 


6.425 


12. ssn 


m^ / 




Instructional resources 


31 


62 


^f5K 






fee 






j^CTt * 


J$ 




Student activities fee 


22 


44 


TiJ0 \ t , g 


= 


Student health fee 


28 


56 


jm f 


, " , ~""~ 


Hepatitis vaccine series* 


115 


115 


-*- . 






Hospitalization 






■■■k. tr^k 




N _<T 


insurance** 








One person 


20-4 


-(OS 








Two persons 


{28 


856 


Dental Hygiene Program 




Family 


533 


1,066 








Supporting facilities 
fee*** 


65 
67 


L30 

67 


rei 

Semester 


Per 
Year 


Student liability 


Matriculation ( new 


$ 25 


$ 25 


insurance* 






students |* 






Dormitory fee (double 


930 


1,860 


Tuition (fixed charges)** 






occupancy)*** 






In-state 


767 


1,53-4 


Student Government 


5 


10 


Out-of-state 


2,460 


4,920 


Association fee 






Instructional resources 


31 


62 


Graduation fee 


30 


30 


fee 






(seniors)* 






Student activities fee 


22 


4-4 


"One-time fee. 






Student health fee 


28 


56 


**The university's program or equivalent 


Hepatitis vaccine series* 


115 


115 


insurance coverage is 


required of all 


Hospitalization 






dental students in addition to the . 


tudent 


insurance*** 






health fee 






One person 


204 


408 


*** 1987 -88 fees. 






Two pers< >ns 


428 


856 








Family 


533 


1,066 








Supporting facilities 


65 


130 








f ee **** 












Student liability 


)5 


45 








insurance* 












Dormitory fee (double 


930 


1 ,860 








occupancy)**** 












student Government 


5 


10 








Association fee 












Graduation fee 


30 


30 








(seniors)* 







"One tunc fee 

""Tuition figures are based onfull-time 
attendance Tuition for part-time students 
(8 i redits or less) is $92 />er credit hour 
for both in and OUt-of-State students 
i he university's program or equivalent 
insurance coverage is required of all full 
tune dental hygiene students in addition 
to the student health fee 
1987 88 fees 



Explanation of Fees 

The application and/or matriculation fee 

partially defrays the cost of processing 
applications for admission and enroll- 
ment data in the professional schools. 
These are not refundable. The applica- 
tion fee will be applied against the ma- 
triculation fee for accepted students. 

The instructional resources fee is 
charged to provide supplies, materials, 
equipment and to defray other costs di- 
rectly associated with the instructional 
program. 

The student activities fee is used to 
meet the costs for various student ac- 
tivities, student publications and cultural 
programs. In each of the schools that has 
a student activities fee, the Student Gov- 
ernment Association, in cooperation 
with the dean's office of the school, rec- 
ommends expenditure of the fee 
collected. 

The student health fee is charged to 
help defray the cost of providing a 
campus health service. This service 
includes routine examinations and 
emergency care. Acceptable medical in- 
surance is required in addition to the 
student health fee. 

Health insurance is required of all 
full-time students. A brief outline of the 
student health insurance program is fur- 
nished each student. Students with 
equivalent insurance coverage must pro 
vide proof of such coverage at the time 
of registration and obtain a health insur- 
ance waiver each fall semester. 

The supporting facilities fee is used 
for expansion of various campus facili- 
ties that are not funded or are funded 
only in part from other sources. 

Student liability (malpractice) insur- 
ance fee is charged all professional 
school students. 

The graduation fee is charged to help 
defray costs involved with graduation 
and commencement. 



V. 



Fees for auditors are the same as 
those charged for courses taken for 
credit at both the undergraduate and 
graduate level. Audited credit hours will 
be added to a student's total credit en- 
rollment to determine whether or not a 
student is full-time or part-time tor tui- 
tion and fee assessment purposes. 

Special students are assessed tuition 
and fees in accordance with the schedule 
for the comparable undergraduate, grad- 
uate or first professional classification. 

• A service charge is assessed for dis- 
honored checks and is payable for 
each check which is returned unpaid 
by the drawee bank on initial presen- 
tation because of insufficient funds. 
payment stopped, postdating or drawn 
against uncollected items. 

For checks up to $50.00 $ 5 

For checks from $50.01 to $100.00 $10 
For checks over $100.00 $20 

• A late registration fee is charged to de- 
fray the cost of the special handling in- 
volved for those who do not complete 
their registration on the prescribed 
days. 

• The university reserves the right to 
make such changes in fees and other 
charges as may be necessary. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 

Students who want to leave the school at 
any time during the academic year are 
required to file with the dean a letter of 
resignation. In addition, an application 
for withdrawal form bearing the proper 
signatures must be filed with the regis- 
trar's office. The student must have no 
outstanding obligations to the school 
and must return the student identifica- 
tion card. 

If the above procedures are not com- 
pleted, the student will not be entitled to 




honorable dismissal and will forfeit the 
right to any refunds which would other- 
wise be given. The date used in comput- 
ing refunds is the date on which the 
application for withdrawal is filed in the 
registrar's office. 

Students officially withdrawing from 
the school will be credited for all aca- 
demic fees charged to them less the ma- 
triculation fee, in accordance with the 
following schedule for the date instruc- 
tion begins: 



Period from Date 




Instruction Begins 


Refundable 


Two weeks or less 


80% 


Between two and three weeks 


60% 


Between three and four weeks 


40% 


Between four and five weeks 


20% 


Over five weeks 






STUDENT EXPENSES 

A reasonable estimation of expenses for 
the 1988-89 academic year for in-state 
students living away from home is 
$11,000; for out-of-state students, $18,000. 
These figures include tuition, fees, food, 
lodging and personal expenses exclud- 
ing travel. To these expenses must be 
added the costs of instruments, supplies 
and books. 




Instruments and Supplies 

Every student is required to purchase a 
full kit of new instruments and supplies. 
A complete list of essential instruments 
and materials for all courses is compiled 
by the Committee on Instruments and 
Equipment. The cost of instrument pack- 
ages is included in tuition and must be 
paid at the time of registration. 

The projected cost of required in- 
struments for the 1988-89 session is 
listed below to provide an approxima- 
tion of the expenditures involved. 
First year $3,000 

Second year 2,430 

Third year 695 

Fourth vear 115 



35 



Textbooks 

A list of textbooks recommended for 
first-year courses is mailed to incoming 
students during the summer prior to en- 
rollment. Textbook lists for second-, 
third- and fourth-year courses are circu- 
lated at the beginning of the academic 
year. The campus bookstore stocks these 
b« m >ks; students may purchase books 
there or at other local bookstores. Ap- 
proximate costs of textbooks and other 
instructional materials are as follows: 
First year $475 

Second year 425 

Third year 200 

Fourth year 40 

Student Professional Insurance 

Dental and dental hygiene students in 
each \ ear of the program are required to 
purchase professional liability insurance 
as a condition for enrollment. This pol- 
icy also applies to all advanced dental 
education students. Undergraduate den- 
tal and dental hygiene students obtain 
insurance coverage through a group pro- 
gram for a reasonable premium. For an 
additional premium, payable at enroll- 
ment each year, this plan can also pro- 
vide equipment insurance. Information 
regarding professional coverage for stu- 
dents is available through the Dental 
Sch< k )1 s Office of Clinical Affairs. 

OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY 
RECORDS 

Transcript of Record 

Students and alumni may secure tran- 
scripts of their UMAB record from the 
registrars office, There is a transcript 
charge of $3 per copy. Checks should he 
made payable to the University of Mary- 
land. There is no charge for issuance of 
transcripts between University of Mary- 
land campuses. A request lor transcripts 
must be made in writing and should be 
made at least two weeks in advance of 
the date when the records are actually 
needed, Transcripts are issued in turn as 
requests are received. 




Disclosure of Student 
Information 

In accordance with "The Family Educa- 
tion Rights and Privacy Act of 1974" ( PL 
93-380), popularly referred to as the 
"Buckley Amendment," privacy of stu- 
dent records is assured. Specifically, the 
act provides for the student's access to 
educational records maintained by the 
school, challenge to content of the re- 
cords and control of disclosure of the re- 
cords. A full policy statement may be 
found in the current UMAB Student 
Handbook issued to all incoming 
students. 

Diploma Application 

Degree requirements vary according to 
the UMAB school or program in which a 
student is registered. However, each de- 
gree candidate must file a formal applica- 
tion for diploma with the registrar's 
office at the beginning of the term in 
which the student expects to graduate. 
This must be done by the end of the 
third week of the semester or the second 
week of the summer session. 

A student who does not graduate on 
the originally expected date must reap- 
ply for graduation by the appropriate 
deadline. 



STUDENT HEALTH 
REQUIREMENTS 

All students are required to have the 
campus-sponsored student health and 
hospitalization insurance or its equiv- 
alent. Detailed information regarding the 
provisions of the student policy may be 
obtained from the office of Student and 
Employee Health. At the time of registra- 
tion each year, students must either pur- 
chase the student coverage or produce 
certified proof of equivalent coverage. If 
proof of comparable insurance is not re- 
ceived at Student and Employee Health 
by September 30, the student will be re- 
quired to pay for the student policy for 
that semester. 

All new students are required to 
have a physical exam, which includes a 
tuberculin skin test (PPD). This exam 
may be done by a private physician or at 
Student and Employee Health at no 
charge. If the physical is completed by 
a private physician, a completed form 
must be brought to Student and Employee 
Health for verification. If Student and 
Employee Health is to be the provider, 
the student should call 328-6" 7 90 for 
an appointment upon arrival on the 
campus. All enrolling dental students are 
also required to undergo immunization 
against hepatitis "B." Vaccine cost is in- 
cluded in the student fees. 



36 



FINANCIAL RESOURCES 



The primary purpose of a financial aid 
program is to provide assistance to stu : 
dents who otherwise would be unable to 
attend the university. Financial aid is of- 
fered only after it is determined that the 
resources of the family are insufficient to 
meet educational and living expenses. 
Any aid then offered will not exceed the 
difference between the total expenses 
and family resources. In the case of new 
students, applicants do not have to be 
admitted in order to submit an applica- 
tion, but the student must be accepted 
before an award can be made. 

Specific requirements and terms for 
all grants, scholarships and loans are 
listed in the Office of Student Financial 
Aid brochure. Requests for information 
and financial aid applications should lie 
addressed to the Office of Student Finan- 
cial Aid, 621 West Lombard Street, Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

UNIVERSITY GRANTS 

In an attempt to meet the ever-increas- 
ing needs of students, the Maryland leg- 
islature each year allocates to the 
university funds earmarked for student 
assistance. As a result, university grants 
are available to Maryland residents who 
demonstrate a financial need. After care- 
ful review of the students current finan- 
cial situation, awards are made on an 
individual basis in the form of Deans 
Scholarships, Desegregation Grants, 
Other Race Grants, and Tuition Waivers. 

ENDOWMENT AND 
LOAN FUNDS 

American Dental Hygienists' Association 
Scholarship and Loan Program. The 
American Dental Hygienists' Association 
administers two scholarship programs: 
the Certificate Scholarship Program for 
students entering the final year of a den- 
tal hygiene curriculum and the Post Den- 
tal Hygiene Scholarship Program for 
certificate dental hygienists who will be 




I 



enrolled in a program leading to a bac- 
calaureate degree. Dental hygiene stu- 
dents who will be enrolled or accepted 
for full-time enrollment may also be 
considered for American Dental Hy- 
gienists' Association Loans which range 
from $500 to $1,000 annually. Repayment 
begins ten months after graduation with 
seven and one-half percent interest on 
the amount of the loan outstanding. For 
further information about these scholar- 
ships, write directly to the American 
Dental Hygienists' Association, 211 East 
Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. 
In addition, local chapters of the ADHA 
may offer scholarships and/or loans. For 
information, contact the SADHA advisor 
on the dental hygiene faculty. 

John Carr Emergency Loan Fund. 
This endowed emergency student loan 
fund was established in memory of Dr. 
John Carr, a dedicated member of the 
Dental School faculty, and is available to 
dental and dental hygiene students who 
have an emergency need during their 
school years. Repayment of the loan is 
not scheduled until after graduation. 



The Dr. Gene W. Eng Student Loan 
Fund. This revolving student loan fund, 
which was established to honor Dr. 
Gene W. Eng, Class of 1963, provides 
loans to deserving dental students for 
payment of tuition and fees. The criteria 
for selection shall not be dependent on 
high academic achievement, but shall be 
based on financial need and evidence of 
potential for success in the Dental 
School and in the profession of dentistry. 

Loans made from this fund shall bear 
no interest until completion of studies. 
The prime interest rate will be charged 
per annum to accrue with the start of the 
repayment period, which shall begin two 
years after completion of studies and last 
no longer than ten years. 



37 



The Edward S. Gaylord Educational 
Endowment Loan Fund. Under a provi- 
sion of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. 

Gaylord of New Haven. Connecticut, an 
amount approximating $16,000, was be- 
queathed to the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore to aid 
worthy students in securing a dental 
education. 

The Russell Gigliotti Memorial Stu- 
dent Loan Fund. This fund is intended to 
provide financial assistance primarily but 
not exclusively to students in the pre- 
clinical years, for which costs are signifi- 
cantly higher because of required 
instrument and material purchases. Any 
undergraduate dental student who 
qualifies for financial aid. and who is un- 
able to secure other university financial 
assistance, is eligible to apply. 

A maximum of $500 annually will be 
loaned to one student; no student may 
receive more than two loans during the 
period of training. Simple interest at the 
rate of five percent per annum will be 
charged, commencing three months af- 
ter graduation. Principal plus interest 
must be repaid within 2~ 7 months follow- 
ing graduation. The fund was established 
in 1977 in memory of Dr. Russell Gigliotti, 
an alumnus and dedicated member of 
the faculty for more than 30 years 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund. This 
fund was established in 1954 by the New 
Jersey Alumni Association in memory of 
Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of 
the class of 191'). The fund is a source of 
valuable help in aiding students to soke 
temporary financial problems. 




Lawrence A. Haskins Memorial Stu- 
dent Loan Fund. This fund, honoring the 
memory of Dr. Haskins, class of 1970, 
provides loans to deserving students in 
the Dental School. Loans made from the 
fund shall bear seven percent interest 
per annum to accrue with the start of the 
tepayment period which shall last no 
longer than ten years. The repayment 
period shall begin one year after the 
completion of studies. 

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Dur- 
ing World War II the foundation granted 
to this school a fund to provide rotating 
loans to deserving dental students. 

The Wilson B. Lau Memorial Student 
Loan Fund. Established by his wife to 
honor the memory of Wilson B. Lau, this 
revolving student loan fund provides 
loans to deserving students in the Dental 
School. Loans made from the fund shall 
bear seven percent interest per annum 
to accrue with the start of the repayment 
period which shall last no longer than 
ten wars. The repayment period shall 
begin one year after the completion of 
studies. 

The Sol B. Love Memorial Student 
Loan Fund. This revolving student loan 
fund was established by his family to 
honor the memory of Dr. Sol B, Love, a 
member of the class of 1961. Loans made 
from the fund to deserving students in 



the Dental School shall bear seven per- 
cent interest per annum to accrue with 
the start of the repayment period which 
shall last no longer than ten years. The 
repayment period shall begin one year 
after the completion of studies. 

Maryland Dental Hygienists' Associa- 
tion. The Maryland Dental Hygienists As- 
sociation administers a loan program for 
qualified senior dental hygiene students. 
Information is distributed to junior stu- 
dents by the Department of Dental 
Hygiene during the spring semester. 

The Dr. Joseph Anthony Pennino 
Memorial Scholarship Fund. Under the 
provision of the will of the late Elizabeth 
Pennino, this endowed scholarship fund 
was established as a memorial to Dr. 
Joseph Anthony Pennino, class of 1928, 
to provide scholarships to deserving stu- 
dents in the D.D.S. program of the Den- 
tal School. 

The Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship. 
The Department of Dental Hygiene 
awards the Patricia C. Stearns Scholar- 
ship to a student entering the senior 
year who has demonstrated academic ex- 
cellence; willingness to serve the class, 
school and community; dedication to the 
profession; and high standards of profes- 
sional conduct. 

The Student Dental Association- 
Alumni Fund. This fund, created in 1960, 
was established for the purpose of aid- 
ing any student who may be in need of 
an emergency loan. 

The following government, bank and 
private lender loans also are available to 
students on the basis of need: Health 
Professions .student Loan, Perkins Loan, 
Guaranteed Student Loan. Health Educa- 
tion Assistance Loan and Supplemental 
Loans. All requirements, interest rates 
and terms for these loans can be found 
in the Office of Student financial Aid 
brochure. 



SS 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



DENTAL SCHOOL 

Administrative Officers 

Dean 

Errol L. Reese, B.S., Fairmont State College, 
I960; D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1963; 
MS, University of Detroit, 1968. 
Senior Associate Dean 
Warren M. Morganstein, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1975- 
Associate Dean for Academic and 
Student Affairs 

Ernest F. Moreland, B.S., University of 
Georgia, I960; M.A., Western Carolina Univer- 
sity, 1962; Ed.D., Indiana University, 1967. 
Associate Dean for Clinical and 
Hospital Affairs 

John F. Hasler, B.S., Indiana University, 1958; 
D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 
Associate Dean for Professional Development 
H. Thomas Chandler, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1957. 

.Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 
Mark L. Wagner, A.B., Birmingham Southern 
College, 1959; D.M.D., University of Alabama, 
1963. 

Director of Admissions and Recruitment 
James R. Swancar, B.A., Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1952; D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 1963. 

Faculty Emeriti 

John J. Salley, D.D.S., PhD. 
Dean Emeritus 
Irving I. Abramson, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Raymond M. Burgison, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 
Joseph P. Cappuccio, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Frank A. Dolle, D.D.S., Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 




Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S 
Professor Emeritus 
Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M. 
Professor Emeritus 
Frank C.Jerbi, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
John P. Lambooy. Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 
Martin Lunin, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Kyrle W Preis, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Charles T. Pridgeon, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Donald E. Shay, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 
John I. White, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 
Riley S. Williamson, Jr., D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 
Marvin M. Graham, D.D.S. 
Clinical Professor Emeritus 



Faculty 

Abosch, John P., Lecturer, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., University of Baltimore, 
1966. 

Abraham, George C, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, I.Sc, 
Nowrajee Wadia College (India), 1958; 
B.D.S., Bombay University, 196-i; M.S . 
Loma Linda University, 1967. 

Abrams, Ronald G., Professor, Pediatric Den- 
tistry B.S., University of Massachusetts, 
1958; D.M.D., Tufts University. 1962; M.S., 
1966. 

Abramson, Irving I., Professor Emeritus. En- 
dodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1932. 

Ackerman, Ronald I., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1976. 

Agarwal, Sudha, Research Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.Sc, Agra University, India. 
1966; M.Sc, 1968; Ph.D., Northeastern Uni- 
versity, 1973. 



39 



Archer, Sandra Y., Assistant Professor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., Trinity College. 1973; M S . 
University of Connecticut. 1976; D Ml). 
1980; MS, University of North Carolina. 
1983. 

Archibald, David, Assistant Professor. Oral 
Pathology, B.S., Tufts University, 1975; 
D.M.D., Harvard University, 1979; D Sc . 
1986. 

Ashman, Steven G., Clinical .Associate Pro- 
fessor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 
1970. 

Baer, Marvin L.. Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Removable Prosthodontics. D.D.S., 
University of Texas. I960; M.S., Ohio State 
University, 196". 

Balciunas. Birute A.. Assistant Professor, Oral 
Diagnosis, B.S., Notre Dame College, 
1970; D.D.S., Case Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1975; M.S.D., Indiana University, 
1979. ' 

Balis. Sophia, Clinical Associate Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S.. University of 
Athens (Greece). 1957; DOS, University 
of Toronto (Canada), 1966. 

Barnes, Douglas M., Clinical Instructor. Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, BA, Western Mary- 
land College. 1979; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1983 

Barry. Sue-ning C, Professor, Anatomy, ISA. 
Barat College, 1955; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1961. 

Bashirelahi, Nasir, Associate Professor, Bio- 
chemistry. B.S.. Tehran University ( Iran ), 
I960; Pharm. D., 1962; M.S., University of 
Louisville. 196=5; Ph.D., 1968. 

Baumgartner. John C, Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor. Endodontics, B.S., Universitv of 
W isc i insin. 1966; I) 1 ) S . I niversity of Min- 
nesota. 1970; M.S., George Washington 
I niversity, 1974. 

Beach. Daryl R., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery/Division of 
Dental Informatics, B.S., Oregon State 
University. 1947; D.M.D., University of 
Oregon, 1951. 

Bcckerman. ibdd. \ss< H iate Professor, Oral 
Pathology, BA, Emorj University, 1959; 
hi is . Columbia I niversity, 1963 

Bcinoras. John, Clinical Instructor. Ortho- 
dontics. B.S., Northeastern University, 
L981; D.D.S.,1 niversity of California, San 
i ran< is< < > 1987 



Belenky, Michael M., Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery. B.A., Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute, 1955; D.D.S.. Universitv of 
Michigan. 1961; M PH., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1975. 

Bennett, Robert B.. Assistant Professor. Physi- 
ology, BA, Carleton College, I960; M.S.. 
University of Nebraska, 1963; Ph.D. 1967. 

Bergman, Stewart A.. Associate Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Pharma- 
cology, BA, Brooklyn College, 1964; 
I ) I ) S., State University of New York, 1968; 
MS. University of Maryland, 1986. 

Bergquist, John J., Professor, Periodontics, 
D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1954; M.S., 
19"0. 

Berman, Louis H., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland. 
19"; D.D.S., 1981. 

Bernie, Robert D., Clinical Instructor. Endo- 
dontics, D.D.S., Universitv of Maryland, 
1984. 

Bloom. Jordan S., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Diagnosis, B.A., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1949; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1953. 

Bonebreak, Byron A., Jr., Clinical Assistant 
Professor, Orthodontics, B.S., Universitv 
of Pittsburgh, 1968; D.M.D., 1972; M.S., 
West Virginia University, 19 

Bosma. James E, Research Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, A.B., Calvin College, 193"; M.D., 
University of Michigan. 1941. 

Bosworth, Bruce L., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor. Periodontics, D.D.S., Loyola Univer- 
sity, 196". 

Bowen, William J., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Periodontics, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1959; D.D.S., 1962. 

Bowers. Gerald M., Professor, Periodontics. 
B.S., University of Michigan. 1950; D.D.S., 
1954; M.S., Ohio State University, 1962. 

Bowers. Jane E., Instructor. Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S . 
Towson State University, 1987 

Bowman, John M„ Clinical Assistant Pro 
lessor. Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Universitv of Maryland, 1972; I ) M I) . 
University of Pittsburgh. 1976 

Bradbury, John R.. Dental School Associate 
Professor, fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
BA, Ohio Slate University, 1969; D.D.S., 
L972 

Branoff, Ronald s., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Orthodontics, D.D.S.,1 niversity of 
Maryland, 1966; MM). Fairleigh Dickin- 
son i niversity, 1970 

Brooks. John, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.S., 1 niversity ol Maryland, 197 i. 
D.D.S., 1979 



Brown, D. Michael. Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor. Oral Diagnosis, BA, St. Johns Col- 
lege. 1951; D.D.S.. Universitv of Maryland, 
1961. 

Brunner. Martha J.. Assistant Professor, Physi- 
ology, B.S.. M.S., Stevens Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1975; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins 
University 1980. 

Buchness, George E. Associate Professor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S.. Loyola 
College. 1945; M.S., Catholic University of 
America, 1954; D.D.S.. Universitv of Mary- 
land, 1961. 

Burnett. Sidney. Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Diagnosis, Howard University, 1949. 

Buxbaum, Jerome D.. Clinical Professor, 
Physiology, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1951; D.D.S., 1955. 

Callery, Patrick. Associate Professor, Bio- 
chemistry, B.S.. University of Utah, 1968; 
Ph.D., University of California, 1974. 

Canion. Seth B., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.S . Howard Univer- 
sity, 1969; D.D.S., 1973. 

Cappuccio, Joseph P.. Professor Emeritus, 
Special Assistant to the Dean for Alumni 
Affairs, B.S., University of Rhode Island. 
1943; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Carr, Sandra J., Dental School Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Dental Hygiene, A.A., Southern 
Illinois University. 1964; B.A.. Eastern 
Illinois University, 1974; M.Ed., Wash- 
ington University 19 

Chandler, H. Thomas, Dental School Pro- 
fessor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1957. 

Chang, Yung-Feng, Professor, Biochemistry, 
B.S . National Taiwan Universitv. 1958; 
M.S., 1960; Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh. 
1966. 

Chen, Lipen, Clinical Instructor. Endodontics. 
B.D.S., Taipei Medical College, 1983 

Clem. William H., Dental School Associate 
Professor. Endodontics, D.D.S., North- 
western University, 1956; M.S. I).. Univer- 
sity of Washington, 1965. 

Cohen, Larry, Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, D.D.S., University oi Maryland, 

198(1 

Cohen, Leonard A., Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, BA, George Wash- 
ington University, 1967; D.D.S., Howard 
Universitv. 19"1 M I'll . Harvard School of 
Public Health, 1974; M.S., 1976 

Colangelo, Gary A., Dental School Assistant 
Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, BA . 
Western Maryland College. 1965; D.D.S , 
University of Maryland, 1970. 

Coll. James A.. Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Pittsburgh. 1969; HMD. 1969; M.S., 
University of Oregon, 1974. 



to 



Costello, Leslie C, Professor, Physiology, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; 
Ph.D., 1957. 

Courtade, Simon A., Assistant Professor. Bio- 
chemistry, B.A., Wesleyan University, 1949; 
M.S., University of Michigan, 1952; Ph.D., 
University of Rochester, 1965. 

Craig, James E, Associate Professor, Educa- 
tional and Instructional Resources, B.S., 
Western Illinois University, 1968; M.S., 
Indiana University, 1970, Ed.D., 19" 7 2. 

Crist, Diane, Clinical Instructor, Orthodon- 
tics, B.A., Northwestern University, 1979; 
D.M.D., Southern Illinois University, 1985. 

Crooks, Edwin L., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Dentistry/General Practice Residency, 
B.S., Randolph Macon College, 1967 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1973. 

Crossley, Harold L., Associate Professor, 
Pharmacology, B.S., University of Rhode 
Island, 196-4; M.S., 1970; Ph.D., 19" 7 2; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Dana, Allan H., Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., 
University of Miami, 1959; M.B.a', 1961. 

Davidson, William M., Professor, Orthodon- 
tics, A.B., Dartmouth College, I960; 
D.M.D., Harvard University, 1965; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1969. 

Deitrick, David R., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
I lealth Care Delivery, B.A., Western Mary- 
land College, 19^8; D.D.S., Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, 1985. 

Delgado, George P., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Endodontics, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 19 7 5. 

Delisle, Allan L., Associate Professor, Micro- 
biology, B.S., University of California, 
1960; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., University of Mas- 
sachusetts, 1968. 

DeMarco, Lisa A., Clinical Instructor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1980; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1983. 

DePaola, Louis G„ Associate Professor, Oral 
Diagnosis, B.A., University of Maryland, 
1971; D.D.S., 1975. 

DeVore, Duane T., Professor, Oral and Max- 
illofacial Surgery, D.D.S., Loyola University 
of Chicago, 1956; Ph.D., University of 
London, 1975; J.D., University of Maryland, 
1979. 

Dietrich, Charles D., Clinical Instructor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Univer- 
sity- of Maryland, 19^2; D.D.S., 1977. 




Di Fabio, Vincent E., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 
B.S., Xavier University, 1967 D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1971; M.S., University 
of Rochester, 1979. 

DiGianni, Joseph M., Dental School Assistant 
Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
B.S., St. John's University, 1966; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1970; M.S., 1977. 

DiNardo, Hector F.P., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Loyola College, 19-i9; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1953. 

Donahue, James W, Clinical Instructor, 

Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1979;D.D.S., 1984. 

Dumsha, Thomas C, Associate Professor. En- 
dodontics, B.A., L'niversity of Maryland, 
1972; M.S., 1976; D.D.S., 1979. 

Easley, Michael W, Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
State University of New Mirk, 1980; D.D.S., 
Ohio State University, 19^-t; M.P.H., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1979. 

Eastwood, Gerald W, Assistant Professor, Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, B.A., Concordia 
College, 1955; D.M.D., University of 
Oregon, 1959; M.A., George Washington 
University, 1981. 

Edler, Thomas L., Clinical Instructor, Remov- 
able Prosthodontics, B.S., Howard Univer- 
sity, 1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Ehrenreich, Alan, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Dentistry/General Practice Residency, 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1969. 



Eisen, Mark Z., Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgerv, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1969; D.D.S., 1973. 

Eisenberg, Mark E, Clinical Assistant Pn >fess< >r, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgerv, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1979; D.D.S., 1983. 

Eldridge, Roger L., Assistant Professor. Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1975; D.D.S., 1978. 

Elggren, Donald J., Jr., Clinical Instructor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery; M.P.H., Univer- 
sity of California at Los Angeles, 1970. 

Elias, Samia A., Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Removable Prosthodontics, B.D.S., 
Alexandria University (Egypt), 1965; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1985. 

Everett, Marylou S., Associate Professor, Den- 
tal Hygiene, A.S., University of Bridgeport, 
1966; B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; 
M.A., 1981. 

Falkler, William A., Jr., Professor, Microbiol- 
ogy, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1966; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1969; Ph.D., 
1971. 

Faraone, Karen L., Assistant Professor, Remov- 
able Prosthodontics, R.N., University of 
Maryland, 1974; B.S., 1974; D.D.S., ITS. 
MA.', 1983. 

Feldman, Sylvan, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1962; D.D.S., 1965. 

Felton, John E, Clinical Instructor, Periodon- 
tics, B.A., University of Virginia, 1978; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Fine, Charles, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.A.. University of Pennsylvania, 
1976; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1981. 

Fink, Fred S., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.A., University of Dela- 
ware, 1952; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

Frace, Sherri L., Clinical Instructor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., Thomas Jefferson Univer- 
sity, 1986. 

Frankle, Kathleen T, Clinical Instructor, En- 
dodontics, B.A., The Catholic I niversirj < >t 
America, 1969; M.S.. 1981; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1985. 

Franklin, Renty B., Professor, Physiology, B.S., 
Morehouse College. 1966; M.S . Atlanta 
University, 1967; Ph.D.. Howard University, 
1972 

Freedman, Gerson A., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1935 



»l 



Fried. Daniel I.. Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. B.A., New 
York University, 1974; D.M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania. 1978. 

Fried. Ivan S. (Scott). Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Removable Prosthdontics, B.S., 
University of Tennessee, 1971; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1977. 

Fried. Jacquelyn L.. Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene. B.A., Ohio State University, 1968; 
M.S.. Old Dominion University, 1976. 

Friedberg, Beverly H., Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.S., Georgetown College. 
1980; D.D.S.. Medical College of Virginia, 
198-4. 

Ganssle, Catherine L.. Clinical Instructor, 
Dental Hvgiene, B.S.. University of Man- 
land, 1982. 

Garber. Karen, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diag- 
nosis. B.S., Northeastern University, 1978; 
D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1982. 

Gartner. Leslie P., Associate Professor, Anat- 
omv, B.A., Rutgers University, 1965; MS., 
1968; Ph.D., 1970. 

Gaston, Gerald W., Professor, Oral and Max- 
illofacial Surgery, B.S., Miami University, 
1952; D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1959; 
Ph.D.. 1972. 

Gerhardt, Donald E., Clinical Instructor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1955; D.M.D., Tufts 
University, 1959; M.S., I diversity of Texas, 
1971. 

Gingell, James C, Dental School Associate 
Professor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 
1972; M.S.. 1983. 

Ginsberg. Edward L., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.A., Western 
Maryland College, 1978; D.D.S., University 
oi Maryland, 1982. 

Goldvarg, Arthur, Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Diagnosis. D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1980 

Golski. John J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, D.D.S., I niversity of Mary- 
land, 1965. 

Gordon. Bernard. Special Advisor to the 
Dean for Journalism and Publications, 
D.D.s . University of Maryland, 19-48. 

Grace, Edward G.Jr.. Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, lis, Moun! Si 
Mar) s College, I960; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1964; ma Loyola College, 1981; 
Ph.D., 1 niversit) oi Maryland, 1987 

Gray, Jonathan L, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics. B S, I niversit) <>t Illinois. 
D.D.S., 1972. 



Greeley. James H., Professor, Fixed Restor- 
ative Dentistry. D.D.S., Lniversity of Penn- 
svlvania, 1959; M.S.D., Indiana University, 
1966. 

Greenbaum. Jack L., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, BA, 
University of New Hampshire, 1969; 
DM D. University of Pennsylvania, 1973; 
MA. San Diego State University 19 ; 
M.S., New York University, 1982. 

Gregory, Thomas. Clinical Instructor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, BA, Williams Col- 
lege, 1965; M.S., State Universitv of New 
York at Buffalo, 1972; Ph.D., 19 4 8; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1985. 

Griswold, William H., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 1963- 

Hack, Gary D., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Re- 
storative Dentistry, B.A.. University of 
Maryland, 19^5; D.D.S. , 1979. 

Halpert, Lawrence E, Clinical Professor, 
Periodontics, A.B., The Johns Hopkins 
Lniversity, 1958; D.D.S. , University of 
Maryland, 1962. 

Harnarayan, Sastri, Clinical Instructor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., University of the West In- 
dies, 1981; D.D.S., Howard Universitv. 
1985. 

Haro Ulloa, Hector M., Clinical Instructor, Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, B.D.L., Univer- 
sidad de Guadalajara, 19 TT ; D.D.S., 
Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara. 
1982. 

Haroth, Robert W, Associate Professor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistrv, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1958; M.Ed., 1972. 

Hasler, John E, Professor, Oral Diagnosis, 
B.S., Indiana University. 1959; D.D.S., 1962; 
M.S.D., 1969. 

Hawley, Charles E., Professor, Periodontics 
Microbiology, A.B., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1957; D.D.S , Universitv of 
Pennsylvania, 1962; M.S., Universitv of Il- 
linois, 1970; Ph.D., Universitv of Maryland, 
1976. 

Hayduk, Susan E., Clinical Assistant Profess* n. 
Periodontics. B.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1966; D.M.D., 1969. 

Hemphill, Richard M., Clinical Instructor. 
Fixed Restorative Dentistrv. A.B . West Vir- 
ginia University, 1954; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1958. 

Henry, Eleanor .VI.. Instructor. Endodontics, 
B.S V. Our Lady of Angels College. \9^2. 
M.S., University oi Maryland, 1988. 

Hendler, Nelson II.. Clinical Associate Pro 
lessor. Physiology, HA. Princeton I'niver- 
sity, 1966; Ml) . University of Maryland, 
1972. M S., IT) 



Herdoiza, Patricio. Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Diagnosis, BA., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 19~4; D.D.S., Universitv of Mary- 
land, 1979. 

Hiatt, James L., Associate Professor, Anatomy, 
B.S., Ball State University. 1959; M.S.. 1968; 
Ph.D.. Universitv of Maryland. 1973. 

Hickory, Wayne B., .Assistant Professor. 

Orthodontics. B.S.. Trinity College. 1973; 
M.S.. Boston University, 19^5; D.M.D., Lni- 
versity of Connecticut, 1979; M.D.S., 1982. 

Hollinger. Jeffrey O., Research Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Anatomy, B.A., Hofstra University, 
1969; D.D.S., Universitv of Maryland, 1973; 
Ph.D., 1983. 

Horn. Lisa E., Clinical Instructor, Dental 
Hvgiene. B.S . University oi Maryland, 
1983. 

Hovland, Eric J., Associate Professor. Endo- 
dontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; 
D.D.S., 19^2; M.Ed.. Virginia Common- 
wealth Universitv. 1977; M.B..A. Loyola 
College, 1980. 

Hyson. John M., Ill, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Endodontics, B.S.. Loyola College, 
19^4; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Iddings.John R., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S.. Roanoke 
College. 1962; D.D.S., Universitv of . Mary- 
land, 1966. 

Iglarsh, Z. Annette, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor. Physiology. B.S., Citv College i >f 
New York, 1970; MAT., Alaska Methodist 
University, 1971; B.S., Upstate Medical Col- 
lege of Health Related Professionals. 1975; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Imm. Gary R., Instructor. Oral Health Care 
Delivery, BA, Western Maryland College. 
19~8; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 19S2 

Inge, Walter IL, Jr.. Clinical Instructor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S, James Madison 
University, 1977; D.D.S., Medical College 
of Virginia, 1982. 

Josell, Stuart D., Associate Professor. Pediatric 
Dentistrv, Clinical Instructor. Orthodon- 
tics, D.M.D., Fairleigh Dickinson Univer- 
sity, 1974; M.Dent.Sc., University of 
Connecticut. 1979 

Junghans. John A.. Clinical Assistant Pn ifessi m 
Orthodontics. B.S . St Johns University, 
1951; D.D.S., New York University, L955; 
\l S . Tufts University, 1962. 

Kale, Bruce R.. Clinical Instructor. Removable 
Prosthodontics. BA, lniversity of 
Bridgeport. 1970; D.D.S., l'niversitv of 
Maryland, 1974. 

Katayama, Tadashi. Research Assistant Pro- 
fessor. Fixed Restorative Dentistrv. D.D.S., 
Josai Dental University, 1977; Ph.D., 1981. 



(2 



Katz, Nathan, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1948. 

Kihn, Francis J., Clinical Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1952; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

Koch, Douglas J., Clinical Instructor, Endo- 
dontics; B.S., Union College, 1983; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1983- 

Kogan, Stanley, Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

Kronthal, Alvin, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1947. 

Krupa, Catherine M., Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.A., Trinity College of Ver- 
mont, 1984; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1986. 

Krywolap, George N., Professor, Microbiol- 
ogy, B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 
1960; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 
1962; Ph.D., 1964.' 

Krzeminski, Arthur E., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Endodontics, B.S., University of 
Detroit, 1956; D.D.S., 1960. 

Kula, Katherine S., Associate Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry B.S., University of Dayton, 
1966; M.S., 1972; D.M.D., University of 
Kentucky, 1977; M.S., University of Iowa, 
1979. 

Kushner, Melvin E, Clinical Instructor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1962; D.D.S., 1966. 

Kutcher, Mark J., Associate Professor, Oral 
Diagnosis, B.A., Temple University, 1966; 
D.D.S., 1970; M.S., Indiana University, 1977. 

Kyser, Kenneth, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1984. 

Lan, Chung-Fu, Visiting Clinical Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., Taipei 
Medical College, 1970; M.S., National Tai- 
wan University, 1973; M.P.H., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1976; D.P.H., 1978. 

Lee, Raymond J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1970; D.D.S., 1974. 

Leonard, Charles B., Professor, Biochemistry, 
B.A., Rutgers College, 1955; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 

Leupold, Robert J., Professor, Removable 
Prosthodontics, D.M.D., Tufts University, 
1949; M.A., George Washington University, 
1975. 

Lever, Barry S., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Periodontics, B.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1954; D.D.S., 1958. 



Lever, Scott, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1980; 
D.D.S., 1984. 

Levin, L. Stefan, Clinical Associate Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.A., University of 
Pennsylvania, I960; D.D.S., 1964, M.S.D., 
University of Indiana, 1971. 

Levin, Stephen P., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Diagnosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1963; D.D.S., 1967. 

Levy, Bernard A., Associate Professor, Oral 
Pathology, A.B., Ohio University, 1963; 
D.D.S., Western Reserve University, 1966; 
M.S.D., Indiana University, 1969. 

Linnan, Michael P., Clinical Instructor, Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, B.S., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1980; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1984. 

Litkowski, Leonard J., Assistant Professor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1976; M.S., 1983; D.D.S., 
1985. 

Livaditis, Gus J., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., Tem- 
ple University, 1970. 

Long, Ross E., Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.A., Dartmouth College, 
1970; D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 
1974; M.S., 1978; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1979. 

Lusk, Christine O., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, A.A., Brevard Col- 
lege, I960; B.S., University of North Car- 
olina, 1963; M.S., University of Missouri, 
1976. 

Mandel, Bruce P., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.A., Loyola College, 1975; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Manski, Richard J., Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Boston Col- 
lege, 1976; D.D.S., Howard University, 
1980; M.B.A., University of Massachusetts, 
1985. 

Manson, Barry, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.A./B.S., University of Maryland, 
1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Mao, Richard, Clinical Instructor, Periodon- 
tics, B.S., Gettysburg College, 1968; 
D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1972. 

Mark, Michael L., Clinical Instructor, Endo- 
dontics, B.S., Indiana University, 1976; 
D.D.S., 1980. 

Markin, Philip S., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1963; D.D.S., 1966; M.S., Loyola Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1972. 

Matthews, Terri D., Clinical Instructor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1976; D.M.D., 1981. 



McDonald, Neville J., Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.Sc, University of Otago, New Zealand, 
1975; B.D.S., 1978; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1987. 

Meiller, Timothy E, Associate Professor, Oral 
Diagnosis, B.A., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1970; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1975; M.S., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1978. 

Mellonig, James, Clinical Professor, Periodon- 
tics, A.B., Marquette University, 1965; 
D.D.S., 1969; M.S., George Washington 
University, 1973. 

Meszler, Richard M., Associate Professor, 
Anatomy, A.B., New York University, 1964; 
Ph.D., University of Louisville, 1969. 

Metzger, Cheryl T, Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., Ohio State University, 1967; 
M.S., University of Michigan, 1971. 

Miller, Thomas E., Assistant Professor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., St. John's Uni- 
versity, 1955; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1959; M.A., George Washington 
University, 1976. 

Minah, Glenn E., Associate Professor, Micro- 
biology/Pediatric Dentistry, A.B., Duke 
University, 1961; D.D.S., University of 
North Carolina, 1966; M.S., University of 
Michigan, 1970; Ph.D., 1976. 

Mittelman, George, Clinical Instructor, Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, D.M.D., Hebrew 
University, 1979. 

Moffitt, William C, Associate Professor, 
Periodontics, D.D.S., Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1956; M.S., 1964. 

Moreland, Ernest E, Professor, Educational 
and Instructional Resources, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Georgia, I960; M.A., Western Car- 
olina University, 1962; Ed.D., Indiana 
University, 1967. 

Morganstein, Warren M., Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 19 7 5. 

Mort, Kenneth E., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1967; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Missouri, 1970. 

Moseley, Lynne M., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 
B.S., University of Detroit, 1976; D.D.S., 
University of Michigan, 1985. 

Mossier, Margaret M., Clinical Instructor, En- 
dodontics, A.B., Duke University, 1983; 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1987. 



43 



Myers, Daniel E., .Assistant Professor, Physiol- 
ogy, B.A.. The Johns Hopkins University, 
L974; D.D.S., New York University, 1978; 
M S state University of New York at Buf- 
falo, 1982. 

Myslinski, Norbert R., Associate Professor, 
' Physiology, B.S., Canisius College, 1969; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1973. 

Nauman, Robert K., Associate Professor, 
Microbiology, B.S., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1963; M.S., University of 
Massachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Nessif, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Mar- 
shall University, 1973; D.D.S., West Virginia 
University 1979. 

Niehaus, Carol S., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Diagnosis. B.S., University of Maryland, 
1984. 

Niessen, Linda C, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Diagnosis, B.A., University of New 
Mexico, 1973; D.M.D., Harvard University, 
1977; M.P.H., 1977; M.P.P, 1982. 

Noguera, Angela P., Clinical Instructor, Endo- 
dontics, D.D.S., Metropolitan University, 
Colombia, South America, 1983- 

Noppinger, Robert W., Clinical Instructor, 
Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1978. 

Orbach, Jeffrey, Clinical Instructor, Oral Di- 
agnosis, B.A., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1980; D.D.S., Northwestern University, 
1984. 

Overholser, C. Daniel, Jr., Professor, Oral Di- 
agnosis, B.S., University of Notre Dame, 
1966; D.D.S.. Indiana University, 1970; 
M.S.D., 1972. 

Owen, David G., Associate Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, A.B., Syracuse University, 
I960; D.D.S., McGill University, 1964; A.M., 
I Iniversity of Chicago, 1969. 

Palmer, James E., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Diagnosis, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

Park. Jon K., Associate Professor, Oral Diag- 
nosis. D.D.S., University ol Missouri, 1964; 
HA. Wichita State l Iniversity, 1969; M S . 
I niversityoi Missouri, 1971. 

Park, Sarah K., Clinical Instructor, Periodon- 
tics, BA, The Johns Hopkins University, 
1978;D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Parker, Elaine, Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene. B S., 1 'diversity of Maryland, 
1977 M S , The Johns Hopkins University, 

1982 

Patil, Sudha P.. Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
ti< s, B.S., < leorge Mason I niversity, 1983; 
D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1987. 



Pavlick, Charles T, Jr., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Orthodontics, B.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1961; D.D.S., 1961; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1966 

Payne, Thomas M., Assistant Professor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1968; M.S.', 1976; D.D.S., 1978. 

Pazulski, Francis J., Clinical Instructor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1981; 
D.D.S., 1987. 

Peifley, Michelle A., Clinical Instructor, Den- 
tal Hygiene, B.S., Thomas Jefferson Uni- 
versity, 1986. 

Peterson, Douglas E., Professor, Oral Diag- 
nosis, D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1972; Ph.D.. 1976. 

Philbin, Philip A., Clinical Instructor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., Dickinson College, 1981; 
D.D.S . University of Maryland, 1986. 

Phillips, Bradley L., Assistant Professor, 

Periodontics, B.S., State University of New 
York at Stony Brook, 1974; D.M.D.', 
Harvard University, 19 7 6. 

Plessett, David N., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Periodontics, B.A., Pennsylvania 
State University, 1949; D.D.S., Temple 
University, 1958. 

Provenza, D. Vincent, Research Professor, 
Anatomv, B.S., University of Marvland, 
1939; M.S., 1941; Ph.D., 1952. 

Pusin, Michael B., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Tufts 
University, 1964; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1968. 

Quarantillo. Frederick J., Clinical Assistant 
Professor, Endodontics, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1969; D.D.S., 1973; M.S., George 
Washington University, 1978. 

Ramsey, Wilbur O., Clinical Professor, Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, D.D.S. , Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1943. 

Reese, Errol L., Professor, Removable Pros- 
thodontics, B.S., Fairmount State College, 
I960; D.D.S., West Virginia University, 
1963; M.S., University of Detroit, 1968. 

Richter, Henry E., Jr., Associate Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1954; D.D.S., 1958. 

Robinson, Robert L, Clinical Instructor, Divi- 
sion of Dental Informatics. B.S.E.E., 
Drexel University, 19-2; M.S., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1980. 

Romberg, Elaine, Associate Professor, Educa- 
tional and Instructional Resources, B.S., 
Vassar College, I960; M.Ed., Lesle) Col- 
lege, 1963; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1977. 

Rosen, Paul S„ Clinical Instructor, Periodon- 
tics, BA, Lafayette College, 1982; D.M.D, 
University of Pennsylvania, 1986 



Rubinstein, Linda. .Assistant Professor. Dental 
Hvgiene, B.S., University of Marvland. 
19^6; MA, 1982. 

Rubier, Constance G.. Clinical .Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Orthodontics, B.S., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic, 19^3; B.S., 1974; M.S., 1975; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 19^9. 

Rudo, Frieda G., Research Professor, Pharma- 
cology, A.B., Goucher College, 1944; M.S., 
University of Maryland, I960; Ph.D., 1963; 
D.Sc, Goucher College, 19^6. 

Rule, James T, Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, 
B.S., Temple University, 1953; D.D.S., 1957; 
M.S., University of Chicago, 1960. 

Ruliffson. Franklin R., Clinical Instructor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, BA, State 
University of Iowa, 19-49; D.D.S.. 195-4; 
MA, George Washington University, 1980. 

Sachs, Robert I., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.A., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1967; M.S., Purdue University, 
19^2; D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1978 

Sanders. Brian J., Clinical Assistant Professor. 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College. 
1979; D.D.S.. University of Mankind, 1983; 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1986. 

Sauk, John J., Professor, Oral Pathology, B.S., 
University of Detroit, 1963; D.D.S., 1967; 
M.S., University of Minnesota, 1971. 

Scaggs, Gary W, Clinical Instructor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 19-2; D.D.S., 1978. 

Schoen, Diane, Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1976. 

Schreiber. Lela, Clinical Instructor. Oral Diag- 
nosis. B.S., University of Marvland, 1980. 

Schunick, Howard E., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor. Endodontics, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 1962, 

Schwartz, Harry, Clinical Assistant Professor. 
Removable Prosthodontics, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1961;D.D.S, 1965. 

Seibel, Werner. Associate Professor. Anatomy, 
BA, Brooklyn College. 1965; MA, Hofstra 
University, 1968; Ph.D., Virginia Common 
wealth University, 1972. 

Scrio, Francis G.. Assistant Pr< >tess> >r. 

Periodontics, B.A., The Johns Hopkins 
Iniversity, 1976; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1980 

Sheinberg, Uri, Clinical Instructor. Remov- 
able Prosthodontics, D.D.S., I'niversidad 
Tecnologica de Mexico, 1987. 

Shelton, Preston G., Associate Professor, Pedi 
atric Dentistry, B.S.,John Carroll Univer- 
sity, 1963; D.D.S.. University ol Michigan, 
1967; M.S.. University of Nebraska, 1971. 



M 



Shires. P.Jay. Instructor, Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Richmond, • 
L982; D.D.S., Medical College ofVirginia, 
1986. 

Shulman, Eli M., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, A.B., Ohio 
State University, 1942; D.D.S., 1947. 

Shulman, Mark, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1971; 
D.D.S., 1975. 

Siegel. Michael A., Assistant Professor, Oral 
Diagnosis. B.S., University of Maryland, 
19^5; D.D.S, 1979. 

Siegel, Sharon C, Clinical Instructor, Remov- 
able Prosthodontics, B.A., Western Mary- 
land College, 1975; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 19 7 9. 

Snyder, Thomas L., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., St. 
Joseph's College, 1967; D.M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1971; M.B.A., 1974. 

Solomon, Eric S., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Division of Dental Informatics, B.A., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1969; M.A., 1973; 
D.D.s', 1979. 

Somerman, Martha J., Associate Professor, 
Periodontics/Pharmacology, B.A., New 
York University, 1968; M.S., Hunter Col- 
lege, 1972; D.D.S. , New York University, 
19^5; Ph.D., Rochester University, 1980. 

Spruill, Wilhelma G., Assistant Director of Ad- 
missions and Recruitment, Dean's Office, 
B.A., Fisk University, 1966; M.Ed., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Staling, Leah M., Visiting Research Assistant 
Professor, Physiology, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1944; M.Sc, 1952. 

Stanford, Hilton G., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 
B.A., University of California at Los An- 
geles, 1950; D.D.S., Howard University, 
1959. 

Stansbury, Diana M., Instructor, Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Stevens, Mark M., Associate Professor, Remov- 
able Prosthodontics, D.D.S. , St. Louis Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

Stoker, Patricia S., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Ohio State 
University, 1976; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1985. 

Stout, Craig W., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Northeastern 
University, 1981; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1985. 

Strassler, Howard E., Associate Professor, 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., State 
University of New York at Stony Brook, 
1971; D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1975. 




Streckfus. Charles, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1970; M.S., 
Towson State College, 1973; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1978. 

Suzuki, Jon B., Professor, Periodontics/Micro- 
biology, B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University, 
1968; Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technol- 
ogy', 1971; D.D.S., Loyola University of Chi- 
cago, 1978. 

Swancar, James R., Associate Professor, Oral 
Pathology, B.A., Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1952; D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 1963. 

Swanson, Ben Z., Jr., Dental School Associate 
Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
University of Houston, 1959; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1959; M.Phil., University 
College, London, 1988. 

Sweren, Edgar, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1954. 

Sydiskis, Robert J., Associate Professor, Micro- 
biology-, B.A., University of Bridgeport, 
1961; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1965. 

Tate, Don L, Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restor- 
ative Dentistry, A.A., Community College 
of Baltimore, 1975; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1983. 

Tewes, Warren D., Assistant Professor, Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Randolph 
Macon College, 1971; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1975; M.S., 1982. 

Thompson, Van P., Professor, Fixed Restor- 
ative Dentistry, B.S., Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute, 1966; Ph.D., 1971; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 19^9 



Thut, Paul D., Associate Professor, Pharmacol- 
ogy', A.B., Hamilton College, 1965; M.S., 
University of Rhode Island, 1968; Ph.D., 
Dartmouth College, 1971. 

Tilghman, Donald M., Clinical Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S.', 1961. 

Tilkin, Nancy C, Clinical Instructor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., Loyola College, 1980, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1985. 

Towle, Herbert, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.S., Tufts University, 1968; 
D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1972. 

Trail, Leo V, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 
1975; D.D.S., University of Maryland. L979. 

Urbaitis, Barbara K., Assistant Professor, Phys- 
iology, B.A., Hunter College, 1963; M.S.,' 
1965; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1968. 

Vail, Arthur E., Clinical Instructor, Removable 
Prosthodontics, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1981; D.D.S., 1983. 

VandenBosche, Raoul C, Clinical Assistant 
Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
A.B., College of the Holy Cross, 1962; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 

Vandermer, Jack D., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, General Practice Residency, B.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1963; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1967; M.Ed., 1973. 

Varipapa, Charles, Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Diagnosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1976; D.D.S., 1984. 

Varma, Shambu D., Research Professor, Bio- 
chemistry, B.S., University of Allahabad, 
India, 1955; M.S., 1957; Ph.D., University of 
Rajasthan, India, 1964. 

Vera, Anny B., Clinical Instructor, Removable 
Prosthodontics; B.S., Colegio Maria Mon- 
tessori, 1971; D.D.S., Universidad Central 
de Venezuela, 1976. 

Vitek, Kveta, Research Assistant Professor, 
Pharmacology, B.S.. Institute of Chemistry. 
Czechoslovakia, 1947; D.V.M., College of 
Veterinary Medicine, Czechoslovakia, 
1959. 

Wagner, Mark L., Professor, Pediatric Dentis- 
try, A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 
1959; D.M.D., University of Alabama, 1963. 

Walters, Ray A., Assistant Professor, Remov- 
able Prosthodontics, B.A., Valparaiso Uni- 
versity, 1954; D.D.S., Western Reserve 
University, 1958. 

Waxman, Burton M., Clinical Instructor, 
Endodontics, B.A., Clark University, 1973; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 



45 



Weiner, Stephen A., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral Diagnosis. B.S .. University of 
Maryland, 1965: D.D.S.. 1969. 

Weinman, Jonathan H.. Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Removable Prosthodontics, B.A., 
Clark University, 1975; DOS.. University 
of Maryland, 1979. 

Whitaker. George C, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry. B A . 
Earlham College, 1970; D.D.S., Howard 
Universitv, 1974; M.S.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity. 1977. 

Williams, George C, Assistant Professor, Oral 
Diagnosis, B.S.. Washington College, 1971; 
D.D.S.. Universitv of Maryland, 1978. 

Williams, George H., Ill, Assistant Professor, 
Dentistrv. UMMS, B.S., Tusculum College. 
19^2; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 

Williams, Henry N., Associate Professor, 
Microbiology, B.S., North Carolina Agri- 
cultural and Technical State University, 
1964; M.S., University of Mar\ land. 19 - 2; 
Ph.D.. 1979. 

Wilson, Margaret B., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B s . 
I )a\ id Lipscomb College, 19" 7 " 7 ; D.D.S., 
Medical College of Virginia, 1981. 

Wilson. Victoria E.. Instructor, Periodontics, 
A A . Allegheny Community College, 19^8; 
B S . I niversity of Maryland, 1985. 

Winne, Cynthia E.. Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Orthodontics/Oral and Maxillofa- 
cial Surgerv, B.S., Ohio State Universitv, 
1970; M S., 1973; M PI I . Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1974; D.M.D., Fairleigh Dickinson 
University, 1978. 

Winson, Dennis E., Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Periodontics, B.S., Universitv' of 
Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1965. 

Wood, Morton, Dental School Assistant Pro- 
fessor, fixed Restorative Dentistrv HA, 
American International College, 1965; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1969; 
M.Ed., The fohns Hopkins Universitv 
1979. 

Wooten. Ruth, Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene, A A . St. Mary's College, 1969; 
B.S., 1 mwrsiu of North Carolina. 19 T 1; 
M S . ( niversit) oi Mk higan, 1976. 

Wynn, Richard I.., Associate Professor, Phar- 
macology, B.S., i niversity ol Maryland, 
L964;M.S., 1966; Ph.D., 1970 

Zeller, Gregory G, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Fixed Restorative I lentistry, D.D.S., 
( niversitj oi Maryland, 1975; M.S., 1983 



Zeren, Karl J., Clinical Assistant Professor. 
Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1969; D.D.S.. 1975. 

Zimmerman. John L., Dental School Assistant 
Professor, Educational and Instructional 
Resources, Assistant Director, Academic 
Computing, B.S , Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versitv 1976; D.D.S., Temple Universitv 
1980. ' 

Zorn, Gordon J.. Clinical Instructor, Fixed Re- 
storative Dentistry, B.S., Drexel University, 
1972; D.D.S., Universitv of Maryland, 1976. 

Zupnik, Robert M., Clinical Professor, 

Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
195-4; D.D.S.. Georgetown University. 1958; 
M.S.D., Boston University. 196-4. 

Associate Staff 

Baier, Richard G., Central Dental Laboratory 
Services, A.A., Community College of Bal- 
timore, 1976. 

Brown, Raymond, Director of Fiscal and Per- 
sonnel Affairs, Dean's Office, B.S., Robert 
Morns College, 1980. 

Foxx, Louis A., Director of Dental Laboratory 
Services and Dental Facilities. 

Garland, Robin N., Director of Development, 
Dean's Office, B.A , Western Maryland Col- 
lege, 1984. 

Gipe, David P., Orthodontics, B.A., Tow sun 
State University, 1976; MA, Southern Il- 
linois University, 1981. 

King, William F, Jr., Central Dental Labora- 
tory Services, A.A., Community College of 
Baltimore, 1971. 

Land, Myra R.. Educational and Instructional 
Resources, A.B., Goucher College, 1956. 

Lawson, Harvey W, Central Dental Labora- 
tory Services, A.A., Community College of 
Baltimore, 1985. 

Organ, Robert J., Microbiology. 

Suls, Frederick J., Central Dental Laboratory 
Services, A.A., Community College of Bal- 
timore, 1972. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 

Edward N. Brandt, Jr., Ml). Ph.D., President 

John M Dennis, M.I), Vice President, 
Academic Affairs 

Charles W Tandy, MBA, Vice President. 
Administration 

Barbara C Hansen, Ph.D., Vice President, 
Graduate studies and Researt b 

Judith M DeSarno, Vice President. Institu- 
tional Advancement 

Morton I. Rapoport, MI), President and Chief 
Executive Offic ei; I 'niversity of Maryland 
Medical System 



Errol L. Reese. D.D.S., Dean, Dental School 
Michael J. Kelly, lLB.,Dean, School of Law 

John M Dennis, M.D., Dean. School of 

Medicine 
Nan B. Hechenberger. Ph.D.. Dean. School of 

Nursing 
William! Kinnard.Jr.. Ph.D.. Dean, School of 

Pharmacy 
Ralph L. Dolgoff, D.S.W., Dean. School of 

Social Work and Community Planning 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Board of Regents 

Margaret .Alton 
Richard O. Berndt 
Roger R. Blunt 
Benjamin L. Brown 
Charles W.Cole, Jr. 
Ilona Modley Hogan 
Ann R. Hull ' 
Henry R. Lord 
George Y McGowan 
Peter F. O'Malley 
Thomas J Owen 
Constance M. Unseld 
John W.T. Webb 
Dr. Albert N. Whiting 
George F. Will 

Central Administration 

John S. Toll, Ph.D.. Chancellor 

David S. Sparks, Ph.D.. Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs. Graduate Studies and 

Research 
Raymond J. Miller, PhD, Vice Chancellor for 

Agricultural Affairs 
Donald L. Myers. MBA. Vice Chancellor for 

General Administration 
Patricia S Florestano, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor 

for Governmental Relations 
Jean E. Spencer, Ph.D., Acting Vice Chancellor 

for Policy and Planning 
Robert G. smith. MA, Vice Chancellor for 

University Relations 



.(, 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The Alumni Association is an independent 
organization of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University 
of Maryland at Baltimore, representing 
approximately 5,000 graduates world- 
wide. With headquarters in the Dental 
School and five chartered sections, the 
association is actively interested in the 
organizational structure of the school. 

The annual meeting is held during 
Alumni Week and coincides with grad- 
uation. Each year alumni receptions are 
held throughout the country, and of- 
ficers of the association participate 
whenever possible. In addition, social 
affairs are held at the Dental School for 
the students and alumni. 

Yearly the association honors one of 
the alumni by bestowing its highest 
award, the Distinguished Alumnus Award. 

Officers 

President 

Dr. Don N. Brotman '55 

Horizon House 

1101 N. Calvert Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

President Elect 

Dr. Howard Schunick '62 

Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

First Vice President 

Dr. Edwin Morris 74 

8870 Belair Road 

Baltimore, Maryland 21236 

Second Vice President 

Dr. James R. Sullivan '57 

419 Burnt Mills Avenue 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 

Executive Director 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 

6810 North Charles Street 

Towson, Maryland 21204 




Recording Secretary 

Dr. Robert W. Haroth '58 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Treasurer 

Dr. George H. Williams III '66 

12116 Jerusalem Road 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 



Editor 

Dr. Frank J. Romeo '66 
305 Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Historian-Archil 'ist 
Mr. Gardner P.H. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 
Past President 
Dr. John F. Patterson '64 
21 West Road, Suite 101 
Towson, Maryland 21204 



r 



POLICY STATEMENTS 



FACULTY, STUDENT AND 
INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR 
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Preamble 

At the heart of the academic enterprise are 
learning, teaching and scholarship. In univer- 
sities these are exemplified by reasoned dis- 
cussion between student and teacher, a 
mutual respect for the learning and teaching 
process, and intellectual honesty in the pur- 
suit of new knowledge. In the traditions of 
the academic enterprise, students and 
teachers have certain rights and responsi- 
bilities which they bring to the academic 
community. While the following statements 
do not imply a contract between the teacher 
or the university and the student, they are 
nevertheless conventions which the univer- 
sit\ believes to be central to the learning and 
teaching process. 

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Faculty shall share with students and ad- 
ministration the responsibility for aca- 
demic integritv 

2. Faculty are accorded freedom in the 
classroom to discuss subject matter rea- 
sonably related to the course. In turn 
they have the responsibility to encourage 
free and honest inquiry and expression 
on the part of students 

3- Faculty are responsible for the structure 
and content of their courses, but they 
have responsibility to present courses 
that are consistent with their descriptions 
in the university catalog. In addition, fac- 
ulty have the obligation to make students 
aware of the expectations in the course. 
the evaluation procedures and the grad- 
ing policy. 




A 



} 



-4. Faculty are obligated to evaluate students 
fairly and equitably in a manner appro- 
priate to the course and its objectives. 
Grades shall be assigned without preju- 
dice or bias 

5. Faculty shall make all reasonable efforts 
to prevent the occurrence of academic 
dishonesty through the appropriate de- 
sign and administration of assignments 
and examinations, through the careful 
safeguarding of course materials and ex- 
aminations, and through regular reassess- 
ment of evaluation procedures 

6. When instances of academic dishonesty 
are suspected, faculty shall have the right 
and responsibility to see that appropriate 
action is taken in accordance with univer- 
sity regulations 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Students shall share w ith faculty and ad- 
ministration the responsibility for aca- 
demic integritv 

2 Students shall have the right of inquiry 
and expression in then courses without 
prejudice or bias In addition, students 
shall have the right to know the require- 
ments of their courses and to know the 
manner in which they will be evaluated 
and graded. 



\ 



k 




Students shall have the obligation to 
complete the requirements of their 
courses in the time and manner pre- 
scribed and to submit to evaluation of 
their work. 

Students shall have the right to be eval- 
uated fairly and equitably in a manner 
appropriate to the course and its 
objectives. 

Students shall not submit as their own 
work any work which has been prepared 
by others. Outside assistance in the prep- 
aration of this work, such as librarian as- 
sistance, tutorial assistance, typing 
assistance, or such assistance as max be 
specified or approved by the instructor is 
allowed 

Students shall make all reasonable efforts 
to prevent the occurrence of academic 
dishonesty. They shall by their own ex- 
ample encourage academic integritv and 
shall themselves refrain from acts of 
cheating and plagiarism or other acts of 
academic dishonesty 



i8 



7. When instances of academic dishonesty 
are suspected, students shall have the 
right and responsibility to bring this to 
the attention of the faculty or other ap- 
propriate authority. 

Institutional Responsibility 

1. Campuses or appropriate administrative 
units of the University of Maryland shall 
take appropriate measures to foster aca- 
demic integrity in the classroom. 

2. Campuses or appropriate administrative 
units shall take steps to define acts of aca- 
demic dishonesty, to insure procedures 
for due process for students accused or 
suspected of acts of academic dishonesty, 
and to impose appropriate sanctions on 
students guilty of acts of academic 
dishonesty 

3. Campuses or appropriate administrative 
units shall take steps to determine how 
admission or matriculation shall be af- 
fected by acts of academic dishonesty on 
another campus or at another institution. 
No students suspended for disciplinary 
reasons at any campus of the University 
of Maryland shall be admitted to any 
other University of Maryland campus 
during the period of suspension 

SERVICE TO THOSE WITH 
INFECTIOUS DISEASES 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland 
at Baltimore to provide education and train- 
ing to students for the purpose of providing 
care and service to all persons. The institu- 
tion will employ appropriate precautions to 
protect providers in a manner meeting the 
patients' or clients' requirements, yet protect- 
ing the interest of students and faculty par- 
ticipating in the provision of such care or 
service. 

No student will be permitted to refuse to 
provide care or service to any assigned per- 
son in the absence of special circumstances 
placing the student at increased risk for an 
infectious disease. Any student who refuses 
to treat or serve an assigned person without 
prior consent of the school involved will be 
subject to penalties under appropriate aca- 
demic procedures, such penalties to include 
suspension or dismissal. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
POSITION ON ACTS OF 
VIOLENCE AND EXTREMISM 
WHICH ARE RACIALLY, 
ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY OR 
POLITICALLY MOTIVATED. 

The Board of Regents strongly condemns 
criminal acts of destruction or violence 
against the person or property of others In- 
dividuals committing such acts at any campus 
or facility of the university will be subject to 
swift campus judicial and personnel action, 
including possible expulsion or termination, 
as well as possible state criminal 
proceedings. 

No provision of this publication shall be con- 
strued as a contract between any applicant or 
student and the University of Maryland. The 
university reserves the right to change any 
admission or advancement requirement at 
any time. The university further reserves the 
right to ask a student to withdraw at any time 
when it is considered to be in the best inter- 
est of the universitv. 



f9 



MAPS 



CAMPUS MAP 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 



HS> 




W. PRATT STREET | 



Institute of Psychiatry and Unman 

Behavior, 645 W. Redwood Si 

Kelly Motional Building, 

650 U" Lombard St 

Law School and Law Library, 

SHOW. Baltimore St 

Lombard Building, 511 \\, Lombard St. 

Maryland Bar Center, 5_v; \\ Fayette St 

Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical 

Services Systems Shock Trauma Center. 

22 S. Greene St 

Medical School. Frank C Bressler Research 

Building. 655 W. Baltimore St 

Medical School Teaching Facility, 

10 S. Pine St 

Medical Technology, 31 S. Greene St. 

Newman Center, ~12 W Lombard St 

Nursing School, <->55 w Lombard st 

Parsons Hall. 022 \V. Lombard St 

Pascault Row. h51-(->55 W Lexington St 

Pharmacy Hall, 20 N. Pine St. 

Pine Street Police Station. 2\-t N. Pine St 

Pratt street Garage and Athletic Center, 

cm \\ Pratt St. 

R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center 

Hinder construction). Penn and Redwood 

Sts 

Redwood Hall. -21 W. Redwood St 

Ronald McDonald House. 

635 W Lexington St 

School of Social Work and Community 

Planning. 525 \\ Redwood St. 

The Shaw House. 513 W Lombard Street 

State Medical Examiner's Building 

111 Penn St 

University Health Center, 120 s Greene St. 

University of Maryland Medical System, 

11 s Greene st 

I mi ersity of Maryland Professional Build 

ing and The I niversity Club. 419-421 W 

Redwood St. 

University Plaza and Garage. Redwood and 

Greene Sts 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 

Hinder construction). Baltimore and 

Greene Sts 

Western Health Center 700 W Lombard St 

Westminster Hall. 5/5 tt" Fayette St 

Whitehurst Hall, 624 \\ Lombard St. 



UNIVERSITY AND CAMPUS- 
RELATED BUILDINGS 

1. Administration Building, 73 W Lombard 



Allied Health Professions Building, 

}2 s Greene Si 

Baltin I nion, 

621 W Lombard St. 
i (Waltei P.)C 630 V( Fayette St 

5 DavidgeHall, 522 w Lombai 



Dental School. llavden Harris Hall, 

666 W. Baltimore Si 

Dunning Hall, 636 W Lombard St 

Last Hall, 520 w Lombard St 

(.ra\ Laboratory, 520 W Lombard st 

Greene Street Building. 29 S. Greene St. 

Health Sciences Building. 

610 VI Lombard St. 

Health Sciences Library, ills Greene si 

Hope Lodge, 6 \6 w Lexington st 

I low aid Hall, 660 Mi Redwood Si 



T Baltimore I'rolle\ Works to Inner 11.: 

l Lexington Market 

s Metro Subwa\ Station 

P Parking Garages and Lots 



3d 




Directions to the University of Maryland at Baltimore 



From north of Baltimore: south on 1-95 
through Fort McHenry Tunnel to Rte. 395 
(downtown Baltimore) and exit onto 
Martin Luther King, Jr., Boulevard staying 
in right lane. At third traffic light, turn 
right onto Baltimore Street; turn right at 
first traffic light onto Greene Street; turn 
left at next traffic light onto Redwood 
Street and immediately into the entrance 
for the underground University Plaza 
Garage. 



From south of Baltimore: north on 1-95 
to Rte. 395 (downtown Baltimore) and 
exit onto Martin Luther King, Jr. Boule- 
vard, staying in right lane. Directions 
from this point are the same as above. 
MTA buses numbered 1, 3, 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 
16, 17, 20, 23, 30, 35 and 36 all stop in 
the campus area. The nearest subway 
stop is at Lexington Market, corner of 
Eutaw and Lexington Streets. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 





1988/89 


1989/90 


Freshman orientation 


August 29-30, 1988 


August 29-30, 1989 


First semester begins — 


August 31, 1988 


August 31, 1989 


dentistry 






Labor Day (school closed) 


September 5, 1988 


September 4, 1989 


First semester begins — 


September 6, 1988 


September 5, 1989 


dental hygiene 






Thanksgiving recess 


November 24-25, 1988 


November 23-24, 1989 


First semester ends 


December 16, 1988 


December 15, 1989 


Exam week 


December 19-23, 1988 


December 18-22, 1989 




December 26- 


December 25- 


Christmas recess 


Januarv 3, 1989 


Januarv 2, 1990 


Minimester 


January 4-24, 1989 


Jan uar v 3-23, 1990 


Martin Luther King's Birthday 


January 16, 1989 


January 15, 1990 


( school closed) 






Second semester begins 


January 25, 1989 


January 24, 1990 


Spring vacation 


March 20-24, 1989 


March 19-23, 1990 


Second semester ends 


May 16, 1989 


Mav 15, 1990 


Exam week 


May 17-24, 1989 


-May 16-23, 1990 


Commencement 


May 26, 1989 


May 25, 1990 


These schedules are subject to change, and are provided only for 


general information con- 


cerning tlx length of terms and holidays. 
















52 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



~S3P 



4 




>\* 




Dental School Catalog 
1990 A 992 






The University oj Maryland is accredited by the 
Middle States Association oj Colleges and Set 
ondary Schools and is a membei oj the Associa- 
tion oj American I Universities. The Dental School 
is accredited /n the I '.ommission on Accreditation 
of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educational Pro- 
grams "I the ( ouncil on Dental Education oj the 
American Dental Association. 

Fhe I niversity oj Maryland has been elet ted to 
membership in the Association oj American I ni 
aiuttes This association, foundedin WO, is an 
ition oj those universities in the I 'nited 
States and ( '.anada generally considered to be pre- 
eminent in the fields oj graduate and professional 
studs and research. 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to 
be administered, and no less important, 
human relationships developed between teach- 
ers and students and between students and 
patients. If ever patients are regarded as clini- 
cal material, this building will have been 
degraded and its use corrupted. We must never 
forget that the word patient comes from the 
Latin root which means to suffer. Clinical 
material does not suffer. Human beings do." 

From the address of Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 
Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Regents 
University of Maryland 
Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall 
March 5, 1971 



Dental School Catalog 
1990A992 



THE PIONEER OF DENTAL EDUCATION 




This is the official sesquicentennial emblem for the 
first dental school in the world. Like the emblem of 
dentistry from which it is derived, this design uses a 
serpent entwined about an ancient Arabian cautery in 
the manner of the single serpent of Aesculapius, the 
Greek god of medicine. The serpent is anchored about 
the Greek letter delta, for dentistry, which is inter- 
twined with a circle representing all members of the 
oral health care team. In the foreground is a shield 
bearing the standard of the Maryland state flag. 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Philosophy 
The School 
The Campus 
The City 


2 
2 
4 
5 


HE DENTAL PROGRAM 




Application,' Admission 
Academic Policies and Programs 
Requirements for Graduation 
Employment Opportunities in Dentistry 
The Dental Curriculum 
Departments/Programs 


6 

8 

9 

10 

10 

11 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS 



19 



General Information 
Preprofessional/Professional Baccalaureate 

Program 1 9 

Two- and Three-Year Professional Curricula 20 

Degree Completion Baccalaureate Program 23 

Master of Science Program 24 

ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 



Graduate Education 


27 


Advanced Dental Education Programs 


27 


Professional Development 


27 


RJDENT LIFE 




Student Services 


28 


Student Policies 


29 


Publications/Organizations/Awards 


31 



^9 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND 
PROCEDURES 



Registration Procedures 
1990-91 Tuition and Fees 
Student Expenses 
Determination of In-State Status 
Official University Records 
Student Health Requirements 


34 
34 
35 
36 
36 
36 


FINANCIAL AID 




University Grants 
Endowment and Loan Funds 


37 
37 


ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

University of Maryland 


39 

50 
50 


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


51 


POLICY STATEMENTS 


52 


CAMPUS MAPS 


54 


ACADEMIC CALENDAR 


55 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



PHILOSOPHY 

Since its origin in 1840, the dental profession has 
exhibited a commitment to innovation. Continual 
refinement in clinical procedures has been augmented 
by an improved understanding of human biology. 
With the synthesis of these elements, the profession 
has been able to improve and expand its delivery of 
services. Populations previously unserved — the handi- 
capped, medically compromised, hospitalized — not 
only are being treated but also are benefitting, as is 
the population at large, from improved materials and 
technology. 

The Dental School's programs focus on the three 
basic aims of the academic community — teaching, 
research and service. As a university discipline, dental 
education must meet and surpass its previous accom- 
plishments to ensure the continued advancement of 
dentistry. While the process of education must remain 
anchored firmly to time-tested principles, it must also 
continually extend itself to uncover hidden truths 
within these same principles and thereby contribute 
to man's progress toward better understanding and 
control of his environment. 

THE SCHOOL 

History 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore has the 
distinction of being the first dental college in the 
world. Formal education to prepare students for the 
practice of dentistry originated in 1840 with the 
establishment of the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery. The chartering of the school by the General 
Assembly of Maryland on February 1, 1840 repre- 
sented the culmination of the efforts of Dr. Horace H. 
Hayden and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, two dental practi- 
tioners who recognized the need for systematic formal 
education as the foundation for a scientific and ser- 
viceable dental profession. Together they played a 
major role in establishing and promoting formal den- 
tal education, and in the development of dentistry as a 
profession. 

Convinced that support for a formal course in den- 
tal education would not come from within medical 
schools, Dr. Hayden undertook the establishment of 
an independent dental college. Dr. Harris, an ener- 





getic and ambitious young man who had come to Bal- 
timore in 1830 to study under Dr. Hayden, joined his 
mentor in the effort to found the college. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery served as 
a prototype for dental schools gradually established in 
other American cities and originated the pattern of 
modern dental education, with equal emphasis on 
sound knowledge of general medicine and develop- 
ment of the skills of dentistry. Through its contribu- 
tions to dental and medical progress and through the 
prominent role of its faculty and graduates in the 
development of the profession, the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery has exerted a remarkable influence 
on professional dentistry. 

The present dental school evolved through a series 
of consolidations involving the Maryland Dental Col- 
lege, which merged with the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery in 1878; the Dental Department of 
the University of Maryland, founded in 1882; and the 
Dental Department of the Baltimore Medical College, 
which merged with the University of Maryland Dental 
Department in 1913. The final consolidation took 
place in 1923, when the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery and the University of Maryland Dental 
School were combined to create a distinct department 
of the university under state supervision and control. 
In 1970 the Dental School moved into Hayden-Harris 
Hall, a new five-story building with modern equip- 
ment and treatment facilities. In 1990 the school's 
clinical facilities were renovated to provide a state-of- 
the-art environment tor teaching and delivery ol care. 



2 • GENERAL INFORMATION 



Programs of Study 

The Dental School today offers one of the finest pro- 
grams of dental education in the world. Continuing 
efforts are made to provide educational and training 
experiences consistent with evolving concepts and 
advances in the delivery of dental health care. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program, the school offers 
baccalaureate and master's degree programs in dental 
hygiene. These programs are designed to prepare stu- 
dents for careers in dental hygiene practice, education, 
management and research in private and public set- 
tings. Graduate programs leading to a master's or doc- 
toral degree in anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, 
oral pathology and physiology are also offered. The 
most recent addition to the graduate program is a 
combined D.D.S. /Ph.D. in physiology. This program 
is designed to train students to become dental 
researchers for careers in academic dentistry. A large 
number of faculty members are actively engaged in 
research; research opportunities are available to den- 
tal students as well as to graduate and postgraduate 
students. 

Advanced dental education programs are offered in 
the specialty areas of endodontics, oral and 
maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, pediatric dentis- 
try, periodontics and prosthodontics. Programs lead- 
ing to the degree Master of Science are available 
through the graduate school to candidates seeking 
certificates of advanced education in the dental spe- 
cialties. Also offered are a school-based residency pro- 
gram in advanced general dentistry providing 
advanced level training in the practice of comprehen- 
sive general dentistry, a hospital-based general prac- 
tice residency program through the Dental School and 
the University of Maryland Medical System and an 
advanced general dentistry program for dentists serv- 
ing on faculties of foreign dental schools. 

The Center for Professional Development offers an 
integrated curriculum to meet the ongoing educa- 
tional needs oi health care professionals. Designed to 
refine diagnostic skills and update knowledge in tech- 
nical and scientific areas, courses are conducted 
annually in special facilities designed for the profes- 
sional development program. 

In 1983 the Dental School opened the Center for 
the Study of Human Performance in Dentistry, a 
unique educational, research and treatment complex 
which is the only facility of its kind in the Western 
Hemisphere. It provides students and faculty diverse 
opportunities for the study, utilization and evaluation 
of advanced concepts of dental education and care 
delivery, with a primary focus on human performance. 




Because of its potential as a model for universal appli- 
cation to the training of dental personnel, the World 
Health Organization has designated the Dental 
School a WHO Collaborating Center for the review 
and evaluation of performance simulation training 
systems in oral health care. 

Now in its 150th anniversary year, the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University 
of Maryland at Baltimore continues to fulfill, through 
its graduates, the aspirations of its founders to provide 
scientifically trained professionals to serve the oral 
health care needs of society. 

Student Body 

Three hundred sixty-nine (369) students were 
enrolled in the dental program in the 1989-90 aca- 
demic year. Of these, 38 percent were female; 26 per- 
cent were minority. The first-year class represented a 
variety of undergraduate institutions across the coun- 
try. Students enrolled averaged 24 years of age, had a 
mean science grade point average of 2.91 and a mean 
cumulative grade point average of 3.05. The faculty 
presently numbers over 250 persons, including practi- 
tioners who teach at the school part-time. 

The National Museum of Dentistry 

In 1989, the dental museum, located in the reading 
room of the Independent Learning Center on the 
ground floor of Hayden-Harris Hall, was incorporated 
as the National Museum of Dentistry. It is fitting that 
the first museum devoted solely to dentistry should be 
housed in the first dental college in the world. 
Throughout its 150-year history, the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery accumulated a large and valu- 
able collection of objects and specimens of historical 
and professional interest. Items currently on display in 
the museum include dental chairs and operatories 
from various periods of dental history, instrument 
cabinets, early instruments, dentures representing the 
various stages through which the art of dental pros- 
thesis progressed, the Guerini cabinet containing rep- 
licas of dental appliances from the most ancient times 
through the 18th century, and portraits of leaders in 
the development of professional dentistry. The 
museum is actively collecting poster art related to 
dentistry and has built a strong collection in this area 
over the last few years. 

The museum is open Monday through Friday from 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. except for school holidays. 
Croup tours are welcome, but arrangements must be 
made in advance by calling (301) 328-8314. 



GENERAL INFORMATION- i 



Special Lectures 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture. Through 
the generosity of both his family and the school 
alumni, an endowed lectureship was established in 
memory of the late Dr. Grayson W. Gaver, an out- 
standing leader in the field of prosthodontics and a 
distinguished member of the faculty tor many years. 
The Gaver Lecture is presented biennially as part of 
Student-Faculty Day activities. 

The Stephen E. and Jeffrey A. Kleiman Lectures in 
Dentistry and Medicine. As a tribute to the selection 
of careers in the health professions by his sons, Dr. 
Bernard S. Kleiman established this annual lecture 
program to alternate between the University of Mary- 
land Dental School and the School of Medicine. Dis- 
tinguished individuals are invited to lecture on topics 
pertinent and applicable to practicing dentists or phy- 
sicians. The Kleiman Lecture alternates with the 
Gaver Lecture as part of Student-Faculty Day activi- 
ties. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell Lecture. In 
1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. William B. and Eliza- 
beth S. Powell, presented the school with a generous 
contribution for the purpose of instituting special lec- 
tures for the benefit of the student body and faculty. 
The first lecture in the series was presented in April 
1966. Recently this lectureship was endowed by the 
Powells as a means of continuing to enrich the total 
academic program. 

The Jane Boswell Toomey and Lewis Cole Toomey, 
D.D.S. Memorial Lecture. Endowed in 1982 by a 
major gift from the Toomey family, together with con- 
tributions by friends and associates of Dr. and Mrs. 
Toomey, this biennial lecture was initiated during the 
1985-86 academic year. The Toomey Lecture provides 
a forum for distinguished individuals to speak on 
timely dental research and clinical topics useful to 
dental professionals in practice and teaching. The lec- 
tures are open to all members of the dental commu- 
nity. 

In addition to these annual lectures, there are three 
special lectures which are presented on a rotating 
basis once every three years as part of the Commence- 
ment/Alumni Week activities: The John E. Fogarty 
Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Rhode Island 
Section of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
Alumni Association; The Hayden-Harris Memorial 
Lecture, sponsored by the Alumni Association; and 
The J. Ben Robinson Memorial Lecture, sponsored by 
the Maryland Section of the American College of 

I Vntists. 




fiH 



THE CAMPUS 

The. Dental School is an integral part of this campus 
tor the professions. Located on 32 acres in downtown 
Baltimore, the campus began in 1807 with the found- 
ing of the School of Medicine. In 1840 it was joined 
by the Baltimore College ot Dental Surgery and today 
these two schools share the campus with the Schools 
of Law, Nursing, Pharmacy, Social Work; an inter- 
professional Graduate School; and the University ot 
Maryland Medical System. Some 4,600 students 
attend the seven schools and three allied health pro- 
grams on this campus, which is one of the first centers 
tor professional education in the country. 

The University ot Maryland at Baltimore, a pri- 
mary force in shaping health care, legal and social ser- 
vices for the Maryland region, has training sites and 
extension programs throughout the state and gradu- 
ates worldwide. While serving the citizens ot Mary- 
land, faculty and students on this campus have oppor- 
tunities to join with other professionals in interdisci- 
plinary study, informal exchange ot ideas and inter- 
professional clinical practice and research. 

The Health Sciences Library 

The Health Sciences Library, the first library estab- 
lished by a medical school in the United States, serves 
all components on the University ot Maryland at Bal- 
timore campus. It is the regional medical library for 10 
states and the District ot Columbia, as part ot the bio- 
medical information network of the National Library 
ot Medicine. The library has over 290,000 volumes, 
including 3,100 current journal titles, and is ranked 
in size among the top 15 health sciences libraries in 
the United States. 



4 • GEN ERA 1 IN FOR MAT I ON 



The library has one of the most advanced auto- 
mated library systems in the country. Circulation ser- 
vices are completely automated as is the catalog that 
provides access to library holdings. The library's 
online catalog allows users to look for materials by 
title, author, subject, key word, call number, series, 
meeting name and organization name. In addition to 
giving information on library holdings, the system 
can determine whether the material has been checked 
out of the library. The online catalog can be accessed 
from any computer terminal on the UMAB campus 
that is linked to the campus network, as well as from 
any dial access terminal. 

The library also provides access to a wide range of 
automated databases of the journal literature through 
its computerized reference and bibliographic services 
(CRABS). MaryMED and HSL Current Contents®, 
self-service databases also are available for persons 
who prefer to perform their own literature searches. 
Both can be accessed from across the UMAB campus, 
from home or by visiting the library. 

The library is open 8 a.m.- 10 p.m. (Monday- Fri- 
day), 9 a.m. -5 p.m. (Saturday), and noon-8 p.m. 
(Sunday). Special holiday and summer hours are 
posted. Borrowers must show a UMAB ID badge vali- 
dated for the current year. 

Computer Resources 

Microcomputer support for faculty, staff and students, 
as well as mainframe research and instructional com- 
puting on the IBM 4341 are provided through Aca- 
demic Computing/Health Informatics (ACHI), a 
department of the Information Resources Manage- 
ment Division (IRMD) at the University of Maryland 
at Baltimore. Computers in two Technology Assisted 
Learning (TAL) Centers, located in the Health Sci- 
ences Building and the Dental School, are available 
for use by the campus community and for training in 
health informatics applications packages. 

Programming languages such as FORTRAN, 
BASIC and PL/1, as well as statistical analysis pack- 
ages like SAS, SPSS-X and BMDP are available for 
the mainframe computer. Free worldwide electronic 
mail accounts, via the Professional Office System 
(PROFS), enable faculty, staff and students to 
exchange notes, files and documents with others both 
at UMAB and internationally via Bitnet, which links 
1,800 computers at more than 500 academic institu- 
tions. 




Instructional courses and training classes are avail- 
able in Wordperfect, Lotus, D-Base and graphics, 
among others. Students, faculty and researchers are 
able to use ACHI's resources at every step of their 
work, from collection of information through prepara- 
tion for final presentation, including desktop publish- 
ing, color printing and plotting, overheads and color 
slides. 

The IBM 4341 system is accessible from the user 
area at ACHI, from terminals throughout the campus 
and by dial-up modem from either office or home. 
Staff consultants can help with first aid, program 
debugging and applications support. 

Academic Computing is located at 610 West Lom- 
bard Street. The user area is open from 8:00 a.m. to 
10:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10:00 a.m. to 
6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 

THE CITY 

In addition to professional opportunities, the city of 
Baltimore, 12th largest in the nation, offers a stimu- 
lating environment in which to live and study. Hav- 
ing been the location of many significant events in the 
nation's history, including the writing of the national 
anthem, the city maintains a strong feeling for the 
past as typified by the many charming neighborhoods 
of restored houses and abundance of historic build- 
ings. Baltimore combines the sophistication of a large 
metropolitan city with easy accessibility to surround- 
ing mountains, beaches and rural areas. 

Several blocks from campus is the nationally 
acclaimed Inner Harbor area, where Harborplace, the 
National Aquarium, the Maryland Science Center 
and office buildings share an attractive waterfront 
with sailboats, hotels, restaurants and renovated 
townhouses. Connecting this downtown area to the 
outskirts of the city is the new Baltimore Metro sub- 
way system, the first leg of an anticipated citywide 
subway system. 

As a cultural center, Baltimore has offerings to 
please the most discriminating, including a world- 
class symphony orchestra, many fine museums, libra- 
ries and professional theatre groups. For sports tans, 
Baltimore features Orioles baseball, Blast soccer, col- 
legiate and club lacrosse and the nationally acclaimed 
Preakness. Nearby, the Chesapeake Bay offers unpar- 
alleled water sports and the seafood for which the 
region is famous. 



GENERAL INFORMATION'S 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



APPLICATION/ADMISSION 

Equal Opportunity 

The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity 
institution with respect to hoth education and 
employment. The university's policies, programs and 
activities are in conformance with pertinent federal 
and state laws and regulations on nondiscrimination 
regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, 
sex and handicap. 

The Dental School has the objective of securing a 
broad racial, sexual and ethnic balance in its enroll- 
ment. To achieve this objective it gives every consider- 
ation to minority student applications. 

Requirements for Admission to the Dental Program 

The Dental School has established admission criteria 
which permit flexibility in the choice of an under- 
graduate program while remaining discriminative 
with regard to scholastic achievement. Students who 
are majoring in either science or non-science disci- 
plines are encouraged to apply. In addition, those 
individuals with a successful career outside of dentis- 
try, who are interested in changing their careers, will 
be seriously considered in the admissions process. In 
every case, evidence will be sought that applicants 
have undertaken a challenging baccalaureate degree 
program that includes courses in the liberal arts, 
humanities, and social and behavioral sciences. 

Applicants to the dental program must successfully 
complete at least three academic years (90 credit 
hours) in an accredited university. Because dentistry is 
a science-based profession, candidates must include in 
their undergraduate curriculum at least a basic back- 
ground in chemistry and biology, for which aptitude 
should be demonstrated. In most cases this require- 
ment may be satisfied by courses in inorganic chemis- 
try and general biology. Each course should be one 
year in length and should include adequate laboratory 
experiences. Advanced courses in the sciences are not 
required for favorable consideration. The Office of 
Admissions reserves the right to modify the prerequi- 
site courses in exceptional cases when an applicant's 
background supplants the need for such courses or 
when additional courses are necessary to improve an 
applicant's preparation for dental school. 

No more than 60 of the minimum required credits 
will be accepted from a junior college; these credits 
must have been validated by an accredited college oi 
arts and sciences. All admission requirements must be 
completed by |une JO prior to the desired date ol 
admission. Applicants must also present favorable rec- 
ommendations from their respective predent.il com- 




mittee or, if no such committee is available, from one 
instructor each in the departments of biology and 
chemistry. In all other respects, applicants must give 
every promise of becoming successful students and 
dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be 
admitted with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved 
failures. 

The admission decision will be based upon per- 
formance in previous academic programs, the quality 
of those programs, and personal factors, as evidenced 
by letters of recommendation, extracurricular activi- 
ties and a personal interview. Maryland residents 
should have science and cumulative grade point aver- 
age (GPA) values of 2.5 or higher to be competitive 
for admission; nonresidents should have GPA values of 
2.8 or higher. All applicants are encouraged to take 
the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) no later than 
October of the year prior to admission. 

A. pamphlet describing the test and an application 
to take the test will be sent to the applicant upon 
request to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment 
of the Dental School. The pamphlet lists the dates oi 
the tests (given in April and October) and the loca- 
tion of testing centers throughout the United States, 
its possessions and Canada. Candidates should have 
scores of 15 or higher in the Academic Average and 
the Perceptual Ability sections in order to be competi- 
tive. The DAT will be used as an adjunct to the appli- 
cant's educational credentials rather than as an inde- 
pendent determinant of admissibility. However, the 
lower the applicant's science GPA, the more impor- 
tant are the results of the DAT. 

Residency 

Information on the regulations for the determination 
of resident status may be obtained from the Oifxcc oi 
Records and Registration, 621 West Lombard Street, 
Room 326, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Bal- 
timore, Maryland 21201. 

Application and Acceptance Procedures 

Students are admitted only at the beginning of the fall 
semester in August. All applications are processed 
through the American Association of Dental Schools 
Application Service (AADSAS). An AADSAS appli- 
cation request card is available to applicants after May 
1 oi the year prior to the desired date oi admission 
upon request to the Office of Admissions and Recruit- 
ment oi the Dental School. The AADSAS applica- 
tion must be tiled by all applicants prior to March 1; 
early filing <>/ the application is strongly recommended. 
AADSAS will duplicate the transcript, calculate the 



6 • THE DtNTAI. PROGRAM 




grade point average of each applicant, and furnish per- 
tinent information to the Dental School. 

If the requirements for admission are fulfilled, the 
applicant will receive the Dental School's application 
form, which should he completed and mailed with the 
application fee to the Office of Admissions and 
Recruitment of the Dental School. It receipt of the 
application and application fee is not acknowledged 
within 10 days, the applicant should contact the 
admissions office. All applicants who are seriously 
being considered will be interviewed; a personal inter- 
view does not, however, guarantee admission. The 
Subcommittee on Dental Student Admissions, com- 
posed of members of the faculty, students and alumni, 
selects qualified applicants for admission based on the 
applicant's grade point average, DAT scores, personal 
recommendations and the personal interview. A 
deposit of $200 must accompany an applicant's accep- 
tance of an offer of admission and will be credited 
toward the applicant's tuition. One-half of the deposit 
is refundable until May 1 if the Dental School is able 
to fill the vacancy caused by a withdrawal. An addi- 
tional $100 deposit is due on June 1 to confirm intent 
to enroll. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

Students currently attending dental schools in the 
United States and graduates of dental schools in other 
countries may apply for admission with advanced 
standing. It should be noted, however, that such 
admissions occur infrequently because of limited 
space availability or incompatibility of curricula at dif- 
ferent schools. Students admitted with advanced 
standing may be exempted from certain courses by 
passing a competency examination. Any person inter- 
ested in admission with advanced standing should 
contact the Office of Admissions and Recruitment in 
the Dental School for specific information about 
requirements and to request application forms. 



UMES-UMAB Honors Program 

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), 
in cooperation with the professional schools of the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB), insti- 
tuted an Honors Program in an effort to prepare stu- 
dents for professional school study while providing 
them with a sound liberal arts education at the same 
time. The Honors Program consists of honors sections 
in chemistry, biology, mathematics, English and 
social science. It also emphasizes independent study, 
seminars and colloquia through which students are 
expected to explore in depth the various disciplines. 
Specific preprofessional tracks in allied health, dentis- 
try, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work 
are available. Upon successful completion of all 
requirements of the Honors Program, which include 
the professional school admission requirements, the 
Honors Program graduate will be admitted into the 
corresponding professional school on the UMAB 
campus during the year immediately following gradua- 
tion from UMES. 

Admission into the Honors Program is determined 
by the Honors Program Committee which is com- 
posed of representatives from UMES and each profes- 
sional school at UMAB. A combination of predictive 
factors, such as SAT scores, interviews, letters of rec- 
ommendation and a personal statement written at the 
time of the interview will be used to determine the 
eligibility of a student for admission into the Honors 
Program. The cumulative academic performance of 
an applicant, as indicated by the high school record, 
will be assessed. For additional information, write to 
the Honors Committee, University of Maryland East- 
ern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853. 

Combined Arts and Sciences/Dental Program 

Although the Dental School supports a coherent four- 
year program of undergraduate education for most stu- 
dents, it recognizes that some individuals may be pre- 
pared to enter after three years. The University of 
Maryland College Park, University of Maryland Balti- 
more County, Bowie State College, Coppin State 
College, Morgan State University and Salisbury State 
College offer a combined curriculum leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental 
Surgery. The preprofessional part of this curriculum is 
taken in residence in the college of arts and sciences 
on any of the six campuses, and the professional part 
at the Dental School in Baltimore. Students who have 
been approved for the combined program and who 
have completed the arts and sciences phase may, upon 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



the recommendation of the dean of the Dental 
School, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science 
by the undergraduate college following the completion 
of the student's first year in the Dental School. Fur- 
ther information and applications may be obtained 
from the office of admissions at the respective under- 
graduate college. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 

In the evaluation of student performance, the follow- 
ing letter grades are used: 

A — excellent 

B — good 

C — satisfactory 

D — below average 

E — conditional 

F — failure 

1 — incomplete 
A failure must be absolved by repeating the entire 
course, in which case the original F grade remains on 
the student's permanent record, but only the new 
grade is used to compute the grade point average. 

A student whose performance is not satisfactory in 
one or more segments of a course or in some clinical 
procedures may receive an E grade. This grade indi- 
cates that the student has failed to master a limited 
segment of a course but should achieve a satisfactory 
level of proficiency within a short time. When the E 
grade is used as a temporary final grade it remains on 
the student record. Following successful remediation, 
the student will receive the final grade earned in the 
course. An unresolved grade of E will result in a per- 
manent grade of F. 

Students whose work in completed assignments is 
of acceptable quality but who, because of circumstan- 
ces beyond their control (such as illness or disability), 
have been unable to complete course requirements 
will receive a grade of Incomplete. When all require- 
ments have been satisfied, students will receive the 
final grade earned in the course. Except under 
extraordinary circumstances, an Incomplete may not 
be carried into the next academic year. 

Since performance at the D level is unacceptable in 
the clinical sciences, the D grade is not used by the 
clinical departments. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of 
credits assigned to each course and the following 
numerical values for grades: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-l, F-0. 




The grade point average is the sum of the products of 
course credits and grade values, divided by the total 
number of course credits in that year of the curricu- 
lum. 

The performance of each student is reviewed at the 
end of each semester by the appropriate advancement 
committee. The committee determines, on the basis 
of progress and/or final grades, whether the student is 
progressing satisfactorily or if remediation or assign- 
ment to a special program (first-or second-year stu- 
dents only) is warranted. 

Students assigned to a special program are placed 
under the supervision of the Special Academic Pro- 
grams Committee, which tailors a program to the 
needs and abilities of each student and reviews pro- 
gress, recommends remediation, determines advance- 
ment or recommends dismissal on the basis of progress 
and/or final grades at the end of each semester. 

AH first-and second-year students must have com- 
pleted satisfactorily the first two years of the curricu- 
lum before advancement into the regular third-year 
curriculum is approved. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point average 
and passing grades in all courses in order to advance 
unconditionally to the next year. Conditional 
advancement may be assigned to third-year students 
who have not successfully completed all courses but 
who, in the judgment of the advancement committee, 
should be afforded the opportunity to complete third- 
year requirements while proceeding with fourth-year 
courses. Probationary advancement may be assigned 
to students in the following categories: 

1. First-and second-year students who obtain a grade 
point average ot 1.70-1.99 and have passing grades 
in all courses. 

2. Third-year students who obtain a grade point aver- 
age of 1.85-1.99 in third-year courses and passing 
grades in all courses. 

A student placed on probationary status must 
achieve a minimum 2.0 average and pass all courses 
taken during the probationary academic year. Failure 
to do so will result in dismissal from the dental pro- 
gram subject to discretionary review by the Faculty 
Council. 

A student may be permitted to absolve deficiencies 
during the summer session, as recommended by the 
appropriate advancement committee. Depending on 
the type o\ deficiencies involved, students may be 
required to register and pay a fee for the summer ses- 
sion. Students with deficiencies too severe to be 
absolved during the summer session may be afforded 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



the opportunity to repeat or remediate a specific year 
of the dental program. Remediation of the year pro- 
vides students who would otherwise have to repeat the 
year's work in its entirety with the opportunity for 
exemption from courses or portions of courses at the 
discretion of the department chairman. Students who 
are repeating or remediating any year of the dental 
program are automatically placed on probation. 



P*tj|| 



^ 




If it is determined that a student is progressing so 
poorly that remediation will not bring him/her to a 
passing level, dismissal will be recommended to the 
Faculty Council. 

The appropriate advancement committee deter- 
mines for each student either unconditional advance- 
ment, conditional or probationary advancement, 
repeat or remediation of the year, or recommends aca- 
demic dismissal to the Faculty Council, which 
approves all decisions pertaining to dismissal or gradu- 
ation. A student may appeal any action of an advance- 
ment committee or the Faculty Councd by submission 
of a written request to the dean. 

Specially Tailored Educational Program 

The Specially Tailored Educational Program (STEP) 
functions within the framework of the regular curricu- 
lum but allows students to spend up to three years 
completing first-and second-year courses. The pro- 
gram was developed for students who, because of aca- 
demic difficulty, illness or other circumstances, need 
special assistance and/or additional time to fulfill the 
academic requirements. It also accommodates the spe- 
cific program needs of students transferring from 
other institutions. 

The First and Second Year Advancement Commit- 
tees may offer a student the option of STEP or assign 
to STEP any student whose progress is unsatisfactory 
if it is generally agreed that a reduced load and/or spe- 
cial tutorial assistance may improve the student's 



chance of successfully completing course require- 
ments. Students assigned to STEP are placed under 
the supervision of the Special Academic Programs 
Committee, which plans an individualized program 
for each student and carefully monitors progress. 
Departmental counselors in the basic sciences and 
preclinical sciences are available to assist any student 
assigned to STEP. 

Students may be advanced into the regular program 
when they have demonstrated satisfactory progress; 
otherwise they remain in STEP until they have com- 
pleted all first-and second-year courses. Once the stu- 
dent is advanced into the regular program, academic 
progress is evaluated by the appropriate advancement 
committee. 

Attendance Policy 

The faculty and administration of the Dental School 
expect every student to attend all scheduled lectures, 
seminars, laboratory sessions and clinic assignments, 
except in the event of illness or emergency. Since 
attendance is mandatory, excused absences must be 
reported to the dean's office so that departments may 
be advised to offer assistance upon the student's 
return. 

The Minimester 

In the January minimester, students in all years of the 
dental program may choose to take elective courses 
when required courses are not scheduled. The clinic 
continues to operate on the usual schedule during the 
minimester. Any credit awarded for minimester elec- 
tive courses will not be applied to the D.D.S. degree. 

Undergraduate students contemplating a career in 
dentistry may attend this session on a per course basis. 
Information concerning course offerings is distributed 
to prospective students by the Office of Admissions 
and Recruitment and to all enrolled students by the 
Office of Academic and Student Affairs. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred 
upon a candidate who has met the conditions speci- 
fied below: 

1 . A candidate must have satisfied all requirements of 
the various departments. 

2. A candidate must pass all fourth-year courses and 
achieve a minimum 2.0 average in the fourth year. 

3. The candidate must have paid all debts to the uni- 
versity prior to graduation. 



THE PENTAL PROGRAM* 9 



Graduation Dates 

Students who enter the D.D.S. program at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Dental School are required to com- 
plete a minimum of four academic years at the school. 
The length of the program has been established in 
order to provide for the students a comprehensive pro- 
fessional education. Graduation for students who 
complete the program within this prescribed period is 
in May. Students who fail to complete all require- 
ments in May may be considered for graduation the 
following August, January or May, as they are judged 
ready to do so. 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN 
DENTISTRY 

The public demand for more and better oral health 
care will continue to create a climate for growth in 
the dental profession. The average income of dentists 
between the ages of 25 to 29 is $44,480 per annum, or 
1.6 times more than the average income of college 
graduates in the same age group. Income levels are 
always contingent upon and affected by the area 
served, the practice specialty, and the state of the 
economy at the time. 

THE DENTAL CURRICULUM 



YEAR I 

SUBJECT 






CREDIT 






Semester 

1 2 


Total 


Anatomy 




13 




13 


Biochemistry 




5 




5 


Conjoint Sciences I 






3 


3 


Microbiology 






5 


5 


Physiology 






5 


5 


Oral and Maxillofacia 


Surgery 




1 


1 


Dental Anatomy/Occ 


usion 


4 




4 


Operative Dentistry 






5 


5 


Oral Health Care Delivery 


1 


2 


3 


Periodontics 




1 


1 


2 



24 22 46 




YEAR II 

SUBJECT 




CREDIT 




Semester 
I 2 


Total 


Biomedicine 


5 


7 


12 


Conjoint Sciences II 


6 


6 


12 


Oral Health Care Delivery 


1 


7 


3 


Pediatric Dentistry 1 1 


Pharmacology 


5 




5 


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 1 1 


Endodontics 1 1 


Fixed Prosthodontics 


3 




6 


Orthodontics 1 1 


Periodontics 1 1 


Removable Prosthodontics 


3 




6 



YEAR III 



23 26 49 



SUBJECT 




CREDIT 




Semester 
I 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences III 


2 


2 


4 


Otal Medicine and Diagnostic 
Sciences 


4 


3 


7 


Oral Health Care Delivery 

or 

Special Studies (elective) 


3 


3 


6 
(6) 


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 


2 


1 


3 


Orthodontics 


1 


1 


2 


Pediatric Dentistry 


4 


4 


8 


Periodontics 


6 


5 


11 


Fixed Prosthodontics 


4 


5 


9 


General Dentistry 


2 


2 


4 


Removable Prosthodontics 


4 


4 


8 


Endodontics 


2 


2 


4 



34 32 



66 



10«THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



YEAR IV 
SUBJECT 



CREDIT 





Semester 
1 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences IV 


3 


3 


6 


Clinic 


29 


31 


60 



32 34 66 

DEPARTMENTS/PROGRAMS 

Anatomy 

Chairman: Louis Benevento 

Professors: Benevento, Barry 

Research Professor: Provenza 

Associate Professors: Gartner, Hiatt, Meszler, Seibel 

Research Associate Professor: Hollinger 

The basic course in human anatomy consists of a thor- 
ough study of the cells, tissues, organs and organ sys- 
tems of the body from the gross, microscopic and 
developmental aspects. Principles of body structure 
and function are studied with particular emphasis on 
those concerned with the head, facial region, oral cav- 
ity and associated organs. Neuroanatomy deals with 
the gross and microscopic structure of the central 
nervous system and peripheral nerves with special 
attention to functional components related to general 
sensory and motor systems. Correlation is made with 
other courses in the basic science and clinical disci- 
plines of the dental curriculum. The department con- 
ducts research and graduate training in craniofacial 
development and teratology, neurophysiology, 
neurobiology, ultrastructural bases for neuronal path- 
ways and gingival overgrowth. 
DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 

Biochemistry 

Chairman: Charles B. Leonard, Jr. 
Professors: Chang, Leonard, Thut 
Associate Professors: Bashirelahi, Gallery 
Assistant Professor: Courtade 
Research Professor: Varma 

Biochemistry, as emphasized in this department, is a 
study of cellular processes at the molecular level and 
the influences of nutrition and pathologies on these 
processes. The department has two teaching goals: to 
present a comprehensive course in biochemistry to the 
first-year students seeking a professional degree in 
dentistry, and to provide a program of specialized 




training for graduate students seeking an advanced 
graduate degree (M.S., Ph.D.) in preparation for a 
career in teaching and/or research. 

The course provided for dental students covers the 
major traditional subjects of biochemistry. Dental stu- 
dents who have previously taken a course in biochem- 
istry may take a competency examination which, if 
passed satisfactorily, permits them to be excused from 
taking this course. 

The department participates in the Conjoint Sci- 
ences program and is currently involved in research 
projects concerned with the isolation, characteriza- 
tion and immunogenicity of bacterial cell wall anti- 
gens and membrane lipids; brain metabolism of amino 
acids and the neurological significance of their metab- 
olites as potential neurotransmitters and/or modula- 
tors for neurotransmission; induction and regulation 
of enzymes in amino acid catabolic pathways; action 
of steroid hormones on soluble intracellular cyto- 
plasmic or nuclei receptors; and characterization of 
progesterone receptors from human prostate. 
DB1C 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 

Clerkship Program 

Two elective clerkship programs allow selected fourth- 
year students to pursue further studies in departmen- 
tal activities specially designed to meet their needs 
and interests. Students devote a portion of their clinic 
time to these specialized programs; the remaining 
clinic time is spent in the comprehensive treatment of 
patients in the regular program. Clerkships are avail- 
able in basic science and clinical disciplines and sev- 
eral incorporate off-campus clinical experiences in 
various practice settings. 
DCJS 558. Clerkship 1 (elective ) (20) 
DCJS 559. Clerkship II (elective) (10) 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



Clinical Dentistry 

Staff: All clinical departments 

The clinical education program is designed to provide 
each student with a broad background of clinical 
experience based on the philosophy o{ prevention and 
comprehensive patient care. Although the need for 
the treatment of existing disease is of paramount 
importance, the clinical program stresses long-term 
complete dental care founded on preventing the 
occurrence or recurrence of disease. Each student pro- 
vides patient care in a manner similar to the general 
practitioner in the community. Clinical areas for 
undergraduate instruction are designated primarily as 
general practice units. Team teaching is accomplished 
using dentist-managers, general dentists and special- 
ists providing interdepartmental instruction for the 
student and the highest level of dental care for the 
patient. The clinical program functions year round in 
order to provide continuity of patient care. 

Clinical Simulation 
Director: George F. Buchness 
Staff: All departments 

The Clinical Simulation Program is a four-year com- 
prehensive program with the purpose of simulating 
the delivery of oral health care. It includes three com- 
ponents all of which are of equal importance. The 
first provides the student with an awareness of the 
optimum utilization of the body in the performance o\ 
procedures. The second component provides the stu- 
dent with the opportunity to apply the concepts of 
performance logic in the clinical simulation unit. The 
third component provides for the application of skills 
in the delivery of patient care in the clinic. Working 
in instructional settings that replicate the clinical set- 
ting, the dental student learns to deliver high quality 
care utilizing a process that includes attention to 
appropriate control of the operating environment. 

Conjoint Sciences 
Director: Harold L. Crossley 
Staff: All departments 

Conjoint Sciences is the administrative unit responsi- 
ble tor the coordination of subjects which are most 
appropriately presented in a multidisciplinary 
h. In the first year, lectures in Conjoint Sci- 
ences introduce the student to the clinical programs 
available in the care of the dental patient. 

Human growth and development, immunology, 
diagnosis and treatment of pulp and periapical dis- 
ease, cariology, prevention, clinical aspects oi head 
and neck anatomy and dental anesthesiology are sub- 





jects presented in the second year of Conjoint Sci- 
ences. Certification for cardiopulmonary resuscita- 
tion (CPR) and blood pressure measurement also are 
required components of this program. 

The third year of Conjoint Sciences deals primarily 
with the management of clinical problems. Topics 
include dental management of the handicapped 
patient, therapeutics and general anesthesia. 

The curriculum in the fourth year includes an 
exploration of dental practice options and decisions, 
temporomandibular dysfunctions and a series of lec- 
tures on medical emergencies in the dental office. A 
wide range of elective courses is also offered in the 
fourth year Conjoint Sciences curriculum. 
DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences 1 (3) 
DCJS 528. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 
DCJS 538. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 
DCJS 548. Conjoint Sciences IV (6) 

Department of Dentistry 

Chairman/Chief of Service: George H. Williams HI 

Professor: Bergquist 

Associate Professor: Dumsha 

Assistant Professor: Williams 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Crooks, Vandermer 

The Department ot Dentistry is a department ot the 
Dental School and the University ot Maryland Medi- 
cal Swem. It is within this department that the Gen- 
eral Practice Residency and Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery programs function. The Dental School pro- 
vides faculty from its five basic sciences and 12 clini- 
cal science departments to support the didactic and 
clinical components of the residency programs. 



12 • Til t DENTAL PROGR A M 



Educational and Instructional Resources 

Chairman: James F. Craig 

Professors: Craig, Moreland 

Research Professor: Ball 

Associate Professor: Romberg 

Clinical Associate Professor: Beach 

Dental School Assistant Professor: Zimmerman 

Clinical Assistant Professor: Solomon 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Diehl 

Clinical Instructor: Robinson 

Associate Staff: Land 

The Department of Educational and Instructional 
Resources has as its primary objective the implemen- 
tation of a comprehensive instructional development 
program embracing all areas of the dental curriculum. 
Such a program applies the principles of management 
to the process of education and is designed to main- 
tain a constant focus on the quality of the education 
being provided students pursuing a career in dentistry 
or dental hygiene. Facilities include color television 
production and graphic and photographic support. A 
fully equipped Independent Learning Center housing 
study carrels and a wide variety of audiovisual equip- 
ment used in conjunction with assigned curricular 
materials is also available. Consultation on the devel- 
opment of instructional packages, media applications, 
research design, statistics, test construction and eval- 
uation techniques and procedures is provided through 
the department's faculty and staff. 

The department's Division of Dental Informatics 
offers guidance and direction in the application of 
computers and optical disc technology in dental and 
dental hygiene education. It is also responsible for 
maintaining and supporting the school's computerized 
dental clinic management system. It is in this depart- 
ment that one ot the campus' Technology Assisted 
Learning (TAL) Centers is housed. 

The Independent Learning Center is open more 
than 65 hours a week including evenings and Satur- 
days and provides a comfortable atmosphere for inde- 
pendent study. Students, faculty and practitioners are 
welcome to use these facilities at any time. 






Endodontics 

Chairman: Eric J. Hovland 

Professor: Hovland 

Associate Professor: Dumsha 

Clinical Associate Professors: Baumgartner, 

Schunick 

Assistant Professors: McDonald, Rauschenberger 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Hyson, Jones, Koch, 

Quarantillo, Waxman 

Clinical Instructors: Bruce, D'Amelio, Fonseca, 

Gamson, Kaplan, Richardson, Schneider, Trattner 

The student's introduction to endodontics begins in 
the second year. It consists of a series of lectures, sem- 
inars, laboratories and patient simulations that stress 
both the fundamentals and biologic principles of 
endodontics. 

In the third year, lectures are presented which 
expand upon the basic material presented in the sec- 
ond year. Cases are treated clinically with the student 
demonstrating an acceptable level of competency by 
the completion of the third year. The fourth-year 
experience in endodontics is primarily clinical. Com- 
petency in clinical endodontics with more complex 
cases is expected of each student. 

The department conducts research in dental 
traumatology, dental materials, endodontic surgery 
and immunology. 

ENDO 522. Principles of Pre-Clinical Endodontics 
(1) 

ENDO 538. Principles of Clinical Endodontics (4) 
ENDO 548. Endodontic Clinic (4) 

General Dentistry 
Interim Chairman: Lawrence Blank 
Professor: Thompson 

Associate Professors: Blank, Buchness, Strassler 
Dental School Associate Professors: Bradbury, 
Gingell 

Assistant Professors: D. Barnes, Gerhardt, 
Litkowski, G. Williams 

Dental School Assistant Professors: DiGianni, 
Eldridge, Wood 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Brooks, Brown, 
Firriolo, Freedman, Garber, Greenbaum, Iddings, 
Katz, Saedi, Shires, W Tewes, VandenBosche, 
Weikel, Weiner, Zeller 
Instructor: Greason 

Clinical Instructors: Arceo, Goldvarg, Gregory, 
Hack, Hariri, Hemphill, Inge, Irwin, Kushner, Man- 
son, Meeks, Niehaus, Oates, Palmer, Perell, Ruliffson, 
Schmidt, Schreiber, Varipapa, Zorn 
Associate Staff: Suls 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM- H 



The Department of General Dentistry is responsible 
for major segments of the curriculum related to dental 
materials, dental anatomy, geriatric dentistry, opera- 
tive dentistry, treatment planning, emergency care, 
special patient care and medically compromised 
patient care. 

The curriculum in the first and second years con- 
centrates on methods and materials used to restore 
individual teeth, preventive aspects of restorative 
treatment and treatment planning techniques. During 
the first two years, limited but increasing clinical 
treatment, with close faculty supervision, augments 
and reinforces the foundation provided. Instructional 
methodology includes lectures, manual programs and 
laboratory exercises on simulated human dentition. 

During the third and fourth years, didactic instruc- 
tion and extensive clinical treatment with staff guid- 
ance facilitate the application and integration of fun- 




damentals of treatment planning and operative dentis- 
try. The department also participates in the Conjoint 
Sciences program. 

Research projects in General Dentistry include fun- 
damental research on adhesive bonding to dentin and 
bone; evaluation of the long-term bond strength of 
commercial resins to dentin and enamel; long-term 
clinical evaluation of "Maryland" bridges; clinical 
evaluation of new "esthetic restorative materials tech- 
niques" including porcelain and laboratory processed 
composite resins; investigations on the efficacy of 
dentin sealers and on the nature of the dentin smear 
layer; bonding of resins to metal and porcelain medi- 
ated by the use of silane coupling agents; fatigue 
strength of teeth restored by various techniques; use 
of Weibull statistics to predict the longevity and reli- 
ability of restorative techniques and materials; 
advanced curriculum design (Performance Logic); 
evaluation of cavity varnishes; evaluation of simulated 
stresses in teeth by the 5-D finite element method of 
analysis; the efficacy of various agents used to sterilize 



impression materials; imaging deformation of tooth 
and bone for finite element analysis model verifica- 
tion; and the role oi the dentist in preventive cardiol- 
ogy. 

Speeded Patient Clinic. Lectures on the nature of 
handicapping and medically compromising conditions 
and their effects on the patient are presented in the 
first three years of the D.D.S. curriculum, using inde- 
pendent learning resources augmented by faculty 
instruction. During the third and fourth years of this 
Special Patient Program, students are the primary 
providers for physically disabled and mentally handi- 
capped individuals and those with special medical 
conditions or infectious diseases. All clinical care is 
provided in special facilities designed and operated for 
the delivery of dental care to handicapped and medi- 
cally compromised individuals of all ages. 
DGEN 511. Dental Anatomy /Occlusion (4) 
DGEN 512. Operative Dentistry (5) 
DGEN 538. General Dentistry (4) 
DGEN 548. General Dentistry (5) 

Microbiology 

Chairman: William A. Falkler, Jr. 

Professors: Falkler, Hawley, Krywolap, Minah 

Associate Professors: Delisle, Nauman, Sydiskis, 

Williams 

Research Associate Professor: Murphy 

Associate Staff: Organ 

The Department of Microbiology otters undergraduate 
arid graduate programs. The undergraduate program is 
organized to supply students with the fundamental 
principles of microbiology in order that they may 
understand the chemical and biological mechanisms 
oi the production of disease by bacteria and other 
parasites, and the means by which the host protects 
itself against bacteria and related organisms. The 
graduate programs leading toward the degrees ot Mas- 
ter oi Science and Doctor oi Philosophy are designed 
to train students for positions in research and teach- 
ing, particularly in dental schools. Research is cur- 
rently being conducted in oral microbiology (caries 
and periodontal diseases), pathogenic microbiology, 
immunology, virology, microbial genetics, microbial 
ecology, cytology and microbial physiology. 
DMIC512. Microbiology (5) 



iHNTAL PROGRAM 



Oral Health Care Delivery 
Chairman: Leonard A. Cohen 
Professors: L. A. Cohen, Morganstein 
Visiting Clinical Professor: Lan 
Associate Professor: Belenky 

Dental School Associate Professors: Dana, Swanson 
Visiting Dental School Associate Professor: Christo- 
pher 

Clinical Associate Professors: Beach, Caplan,, 
Geboy, Kleinman, Niessen, Shulman, Snyder 
Assistant Professors: Grace, Manski 
Dental School Assistant Professor: Colangelo 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Bowman, DiNardo, 
Goodman, Hyson, Imm, Kronthal, Pusin, R. Siegel, 
Streckfus, Ward, Wilson 
Instructors: Bartnyska Dunn, L. Cohen 
Clinical Instructors: Criado-Hedreen, Emherland, 
Garcia, Lusk, Sim, L. Williams 
Special Lecturer: Abosch 

In its teaching, research and service activities, the 
Department of Oral Health Care Delivery continually 
develops, evaluates and disseminates current and new 
information and methods to meet the needs of the 
providers and recipients of care. 

The major areas of teaching responsibility are: (1) 
behavioral sciences, (2) dental practice management, 
(3) delivery systems, (4) epidemiology and scientific 
literature evaluation and (5) the clinical practice of 
dentistry utilizing human performance logic and 
appropriate auxiliary personnel. During the four-year 
curriculum, students attend department sponsored 
lectures, seminars, independent and small group proj- 
ects, and clinic. Field experiences and special projects 
are also used to support the teaching program. 

The curriculum includes the following topics: first 
year — oral health care issues, epidemiology and 
review of scientific literature; second year — applied 
behavior analysis, communication, patient compli- 
ance and stress management, and dental health edu- 
cation; third year — computer applications, account- 
ing, finance, economics, law, marketing, taxes, prac- 
tice management (planning, organizing, staffing and 
directing) and dental practice systems clinic; fourth 
year — application of dental management principles, 
practice options and decisions, and dental practice sys- 
tems clinic. The third-and fourth-year clinic pro- 
grams demonstrate delivery system alternatives using 
human performance, behavioral and modern practice 
management concepts. 



The department conducts research in practice 
management, behavioral sciences and dental delivery 
systems. 

OHCD 518. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 528. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 538. Oral Health Care Delivery (6) 
OHCD 548. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 

Chairman: Gerald W Gaston 

Professors: Bergman, DeVore, Gaston, Tilghman 

Associate Professor: Richter 

Clinical Associate Professors: Ashman, Kogan, 

Stanford 

Assistant Professor: Eisen 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Di Fabio, Epstein, 

Exler, Goldbeck. Luattman, Nessif, Raksin, Winne 

Instructor: Henry 

In the first year students are introduced to oral and 
maxillofacial surgery with lectures on the manage- 
ment of medical emergencies. Introductory material 
on minor oral and maxillofacial surgery, and lectures 
and demonstrations in local anesthesia are presented 
during the second year. 

Third-and fourth-year lectures cover all phases of 
oral and maxillofacial surgery and advanced pain and 
anxiety control. Students are rotated to the Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in block assignments 
during the second, third and fourth years for progres- 
sive participation in oral surgery procedures. 

Fourth-year students are scheduled on block assign- 
ments to the hospital for hospital dentistry, operating 
room experience and general anesthesia experience; 
they also take night calls with the oral and 
maxillofacial surgery and general practice residents. 

The department participates in all years of the 
Conjoint Sciences program concentrating in the 
fourth year on recognition and management of medi- 
cal emergencies in the dental office. Research is con- 
ducted in the evaluation of non-steroidal analgesics 
for postsurgical pain control and on the effects of hyal- 
uronic acid on temporomandibular joint arthritis due 
to internal derangement. 

DSUR 512. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery ( 1 ) 
DSUR 522. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (1) 
DSUR 538. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (3) 
DSUR 548. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (7) 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences 

Chairman: C. Daniel Overholser 

Professors: Hasler, Overholser 

Associate Professors: DePaola, Meiller, J. Park 

Assistant Professors: Balciunas, Kelly, M. Siegel 

Clinical Assistant Professor: Lee 

The curriculum in oral medicine and diagnosis 
includes the basic principles of the patient interview, 
the fundamentals of physical examination, recogni- 
tion of oral disease, and the management of patients 
with oral and/or systemic disease. 

Principles of Biomedicine, an interdisciplinary 
course taught in conjunction with the Department of 
Oral Pathology, introduces the second-year student to 
oral diagnosis through didactic presentations concern- 
ing the patient interview, clinical examination, oral 
radiology and treatment planning. Clinical aspects of 
the course are introduced through General Dentistry. 

Principles of oral medicine and diagnosis are taught 
in the third and fourth years clinically and didacti- 
cally. These courses reinforce the concept that the 
dentist should receive adequate training in obtaining 
medical histories, performing appropriate physical 
examinations, interpreting the results of various labo- 
ratory tests and, most importantly, relating the physi- 
cal status of the patient to the dental treatment plan. 

The department conducts research in dental man- 
agement of medically compromised patients, preven- 
tion of infection in immuno-compromised patients, 
prevention of bacterial endocarditis, evaluation of 
drugs to treat bacterial and fungal infections of the 
oral cavity and the role of viruses in cancer and its 
treatment. 

DPAT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 
DIAG 538. Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences 
(7) 

DIAG 548. Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences 
(4) 

Oral Pathology 

Chairman: John J. Sauk 

Professor: Sauk 

Associate Professors: Beckerman, Levy, Swancar 

Assistant Professor: Archibald 

The undergraduate teaching program consists of an 
interdisciplinary course that covers the basic princi- 
ples of pathology and medicine through presentation 
of the morphologic, chemical and physiologic changes 
of basic disease processes and important specific dis- 
eases. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis, etiology, 
pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of disease 
processes in the oral cavity. The aim is to provide a 




sound basis for the differential diagnosis of oral lesions 
and a rationale for their treatment. The student is 
provided ample opportunity to develop proficiency in 
problem solving in oral diagnosis. A variety of tech- 
niques for examination and diagnosis are covered, 
including dental radiography. 

The department presents courses for postgraduate 
students and offers graduate programs leading to a 
master's or doctoral degree. Research and graduate 
training are conducted in the pathobiology of connec- 
tive tissues, stress proteins and the virology and 
immune response to H1V-I (AIDS virus). Also gradu- 
ate training programs are offered in surgical and clini- 
cal oral pathology. 
DPAT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 

Orthodontics 

Chairman: William M. Davidson 
Professor: Davidson 
Associate Professor: Josell 
Clinical Associate Professor: Pavlick 
Assistant Professors: DeMarco, Shroff, S. Siegel 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Branott, Fink, 
Junghans, Kogod, Long, Markin, Rubier, Sweren, 
Weisberg 

Clinical Instructors: Apicella, Barron, Kula, Leiss, 
Pine, Richards 
Associate Staff: Lawson 

The predoctoral program of instruction in orthodon- 
tics is directed toward providing the dental student 
with the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize 
an established or developing malocclusion, provide 
preventive and therapeutic treatment within the scope 
of the general dental practice, consult as a team mem- 
ber with the specialist, refer cases requiring specialist 
care as appropriate and coordinate comprehensive 
care of the patient. 

Instruction in orthodontics occurs during all four 
years of the dental program. Didactic and laboratory- 
exercises provide a strong foundation tor delivery of 
limited orthodontic treatment as part of an adult and 
child patient's comprehensive dental care. Elective 
and clerkship opportunities are available for those 
who wish to pursue additional course work and clini- 
cal experience. 

The department conducts research in growth and 
development, the biology of tooth movement, proper- 
ties and bio-compatibility of orthodontic materials 
and the physiology ol facial musculature. 
ORTH 522. Orthodontics ( 1 ) 
ORTH 538. Orthodontics (2) 
ORTH 548. Orthodontics (2) 



Id • T HE DENTA L PROGRAM 




Pediatric Dentistry 

Chairman: James T. Rule 

Professors: Abrams, Minah, Rule, Warner 

Clinical Professor: Kihn 

Research Professor: Bosma 

Associate Professors: Josell, Kula, Owen, Shelton 

Clinical Associate Professors: Balis, Coll 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Ackerman, Ginsberg, 

Sanders 

Clinical Instructor: Wiener 

The primary introduction to dentistry for children 
begins in the third year through didactic instruction 
and clinical experiences and continues during the 
fourth year of the dental program. The department 
also presents lectures and laboratory projects and par- 
ticipates in Conjoint Sciences during the first two 
years. Particular attention is devoted to diagnosis and 
treatment planning, preventive dentistry procedures 
including fluoride therapy, non-punitive patient man- 
agement techniques incorporating the use of psycho- 
pharmacologic agents, treatment of traumatic injuries 
to the primary and young permanent dentition, restor- 
ative procedures in primary teeth, pulpal therapy and 
interceptive orthodontics. Departmental educational 
goals are established enabling graduates to provide 
comprehensive dental care for the young patients 
while encouraging the development of a positive atti- 
tude toward dental care. 

Research efforts are devoted to the study of fluo- 
rides and their effect on dental materials, biological 
markers in tooth ring analysis and evaluation of thera- 
peutic agents by means of clinical trials. 
PEDS 522. Pediatric Dentistry (1) 
PEDS 538. Pediatric Dentistry (8) 
PEDS 548. Pediatric Dentistry (6) 



Periodontics 

Chairman: John J. Bergquist 

Professors: Bergquist, G. Bowers, Hawley 

Clinical Professors: Halpert, Zupnik 

Associate Professors: Moffitt, Somerman 

Clinical Associate Professors: Golski, B. S. Lever, 

Plessett, Winson 

Research Associate Professor: Charon 

Assistant Professors: Phillips, Serio 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Bowen, Feldman, 

Gray, Kassolis, B. A. Lever, Mandel, S. Park, Quin- 

tero, Rethman, Rosen, Sachs, Sandifer, Trail, Zeren 

Research Assistant Professors: Agarwal, J. Bowers, 

Holen, Reynolds 

Clinical Instructors: Altman, C. Barnes, Cohen, 

Curley, Felthousen, Foster, Khajezadeh, Manski, 

Morrison, Mutzig, Robson, Schoen, Smith, Sutter, 

Tetzner, L. Tewes, Warren, Wilson 

Students are introduced to fundamental periodontics 
in lectures during the first and second years; clinical 
experience begins in the first year of the dental pro- 




gram. In the third year, students have didactic expo- 
sure to advanced periodontal procedures. Third-and 
fourth-year students enter into a learning contract 
that delineates a set of basic minimum clinical experi- 
ences. Interested students have the opportunity to 
choose from a broad range of additional experiences 
and to contract for both additional experiences and 
the grade the student feels these experiences warrant. 
Thus, the individual student has substantial involve- 
ment in establishing his/her educational goals. 

The department conducts research in regenerative 
therapy, neutrophil chemotaxis, genetics, chemother- 
apeutic agents, connective tissue metabolism, disease 
detection and education. 
PERI 518. Periodontics (2) 
PERI 522. Periodontics (1) 
PERI 538. Periodontics (11) 
PERI 548. Periodontics (11) 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM • L 



Pharmacology 

Chairman: Richard L. Wynn 

Professors: Bergman, Thut 

Research Professor: Rudo 

Associate Professors: Crossley, Somerman, Wynn 

Research Assistant Professor: Vitek 

The program of instruction in pharmacology is 
divided into three phases. The first phase includes a 
thorough study of the basic concepts and principles in 
pharmacology. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms 
of action, absorption, distribution, metabolism and 
excretion of drugs, therapeutic indications, common 
adverse reactions and drug interactions. The second 
phase teaches oral therapeutics, drug interactions and 
pain and anxiety control through departmental par- 
ticipation in the Conjoint Sciences program. The 
third phase, designed for graduate and postdoctoral 
students, provides in-depth coverage of current topics 
in analgesia, local and general anesthesia, dental ther- 
apeutics and dental toxicology. The department con- 
ducts research and graduate training in neurophar- 
macology relating to analgesia, general anesthesia and 
skeletal muscle relaxants. 

DPHR 521. General Pharmacology and Therapeu- 
tics (5) 

Physiology 

Chairman: Leslie C. Costello 

Professors: Costello, Franklin 

Clinical Professor: Buxbaum 

Associate Professor: Myslinski 

Clinical Associate Professor: Hendler 

Assistant Professors: Bennett, Urbaitis 

Clinical Assistant Professor: Iglarsh 

Visiting Research Assistant Professor: Staling 

The Department of Physiology offers both undergrad- 
uate and graduate programs. The undergraduate 
course stresses the basic principles of physiology and 
provides the student with knowledge o{ the function 
of the principal organ systems of the body. Dentally 
oriented aspects of physiology are taught through 
departmental participation in the Conjoint Sciences 
program. The department also presents courses for 
graduate and postgraduate students and offers gradu- 
ate programs leading to the master's and doctoral 
degrees and a combined D.D.S./Ph.D. for students 
interested in careers in teaching and research. 

The department conducts research and graduate 
training in oral neurophysiology, craniofacial pain, 
cardiopulmonary physiology, endocrinology and 
repri »du< ti< >n, and renal physiology. 
DPHS 512. Principles of Physiology (5) 




Prosthodontics 

Interim Chairman: Marvin L. Baer 

Professor: Reese 

Associate Professors: Haroth, Stevens 

Dental School Associate Professors: Baer, Eastwood, 

Elias, Faraone, T Miller, Walters 

Clinical Associate Professors: Griswold, Gunderson, 

Mort 

Assistant Professor: Edler 

Dental School Assistant Professor: Payne 

Clinical Assistant Professors: I. S. Fried, Schwartz, 

Whitaker 

Clinical Instructors: K. Chu, N. Chu, Kale, Loza, 

Moldotsky, Scaggs, S. Siegel, Slade, Tate, Vail, Zweier 

Prosthodontics concentrates on the art and science 
involved in replacing lost dental and associated struc- 
tures by means of fixed and removable artificial appli- 
ances. These appliances are designed and constructed 
to restore and maintain function, appearance, speech, 
comfort, health and the self-image of the patient. Stu- 
dents receive didactic and laboratory instruction in 
fixed and removable prosthodontics in the second year 
and didactic instruction in the effective management 
of clinical prosthodontic procedures in the third year. 
In both clinical years they work under the guidance of 
staff members to provide clinical treatment tor 
prosthodontic patients. 

The department conducts research in overdentures, 
implant dentures, vital pulpotomy and microbiologi- 
cal studies rehired to dentures and prosthetic labora- 
tory asepsis. 

PROS 528. Fixed Prosthodontics (6) 
PROS 529. Removable Prosthodontics (6) 
PROS 538. Fixed Prosthodontics (9) 
PROS 539. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 
PROS 548. Fixed Prosthodontics (10) 
PROS 549. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 



I II I DENTA1 PROGR A M 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS 



Chairman: Cheryl T. Samuels 
Associate Professor: Parker, Rubinstein-DeVore 
Dental School Associate Professor: Wooten 
Assistant Professors: Barata, Fried, Samuels 
Dental School Assistant Professor: Carr 
Clinical Instructors: Bress, Peifley, Slotke, Soltesz 
Academic Advisors: 

Carr (Preprofessional B.S. Program) 

Rubinstein-DeVore (Degree Completion B.S. 

Program) 

Samuels (Graduate Program) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Dental School offers both a Bachelor of Science 
and a Master of Science degree in dental hygiene. The 
baccalaureate degree can be earned in one of two edu- 
cational programs: the Preprofessional/Professional 
Program and the Degree Completion Program. The 
objective of both baccalaureate auxiliary programs is 
to guide the students' development of the knowledge, 
skills, attitudes and values needed to assume positions 
of responsibility as dental auxiliaries in a variety of 
health care, educational, research and community 
settings. In addition, these programs are designed to 
provide a foundation for graduate study in dental 
hygiene or related disciplines. Information about the 
graduate program in dental hygiene begins on page 
24. 

The dental hygienist is an auxiliary member of the 
dental health care team who strives to improve oral 
health by providing preventive and educational ser- 
vices to the public. Clinical dental hygiene services 
include assessing patients' general and oral health sta- 
tus, removing deposits and stains from teeth, taking 
dental x-rays and applying fluorides and sealants. Edu- 
cational and management services for individuals 
and/or groups may include providing nutritional and 
oral hygiene counseling; conducting educational pro- 
grams; and planning, implementing and evaluating 
community oral health programs. 
Employment Opportunities in Dental Hygiene. The 
majority of dental hygienists are employed in private 
dental offices. However, there are increasing opportu- 
nities for those with baccalaureate and graduate 
degrees in dental hygiene education; community, 
school and public health programs; private and public 
institutions; armed forces; research; and other special 
areas of practice. 

Current dental hygiene graduates, working full 
time, can anticipate initial annual income of approxi- 
mately $30,000, depending on the area, responsibili- 
ties, type of practice and general economic condi- 
tions. 




PREPROFESSIONAL/PROFESSIONAL 
BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

This program consists of two main parts: a two-year 
preprofessional curriculum at one of the three Univer- 
sity of Maryland campuses (College Park, Baltimore 
County or Eastern Shore) or at another accredited 
college or university, and a two-or three-year profes- 
sional curriculum at the Dental School, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore. 

Two-Year Preprofessional Curriculum 

A listing of the courses and credit hour requirements 
for the preprofessional curriculum follows. These 
courses provide a foundation in basic sciences, social 
sciences and general education. It is recommended 
that students meet with the dental hygiene advisor 
each semester to ensure appropriate course schedul- 
ing. 



Courses 


English Composition 


6 


'Inorganic Chemistry 


4 


'Organic Chemistry 


4 


General Zoology or Biology 


4 


General Psychology 


3 


General Sociology 


3 


Public Speaking 


3 


* Human Anatomy and Physiology 


8 


'Microbiology 


4 


Principles of Nutrition 


3 


* 'Humanities 


6 


'"Social Sciences 


6 


Statistics 


3 


Electives 


3 



60 
'These courses must include a laboratory and meet the 
requirements for science majors. Survey or terminal 
courses for non-science majors are not acceptable for 
transfer. 

'Humanities: Courses must be selected from the follow- 
ing areas: literature, philosophy, history, fine arts, 
speech, math or language. 

'Social Sciences: General psychology and sociology are 
required; the remaining six credits should be selected 
from courses in psychology, sociology, computer sci- 
ence, government and politics, or anthropology. 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS* 19 



Application and Admission Procedures 

High school students who wish to enroll in the pre- 
professional curriculum should request applications 
directly from the admissions office of the University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens 
Avenue, Catonsville, Maryland 21228; or the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Mary- 
land 21853; or any accredited college or university. 

It is recommended that those preparing for a bacca- 
laureate degree in dental hygiene pursue an academic 
program in high school which includes courses in 
biology, chemistry, algebra and social sciences. 

TWO-AND THREE-YEAR 
PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Two-Year Professional Curriculum 

The professional curriculum includes clinical and 
didactic courses in the Dental School. Throughout 
these two years, dental hygiene students work concur- 
rently with dental students to provide patient care. 

During the first year, students expand upon their 
preprofessional basic science knowledge as it pertains 
to dental hygiene practice. In a clinical setting, the 
students begin to develop the skills, knowledge and 
judgment necessary to collect data for patient treat- 
ment; assess each patient's oral health status; and 
select and provide preventive and educational ser- 
vices, based on the individual needs of the patient. 

During the second year, students demonstrate 
increasing proficiency and self-direction in assessing 
patients' oral health status, planning and providing 
preventive services and identifying the need for con- 
sultation and referral. To enrich their educational 
experiences, students provide educational and/or clin- 
ical services in a variety of community settings, such 
as hospitals; schools; and facilities for the handi- 
capped, chronically ill and aged. They also have an 
opportunity to work with dental students as primary 
providers for the physically disabled, mentally handi- 
capped and individuals with serious medical condi- 
tions or infectious diseases. Senior students also take 
courses in education, research and management 
which enable them to develop fundamental skills that 
are necessary for various career options within the 
profession. 




JUNIOR YEAR 


CREDIT 




Semester I 


Prevention and Control of Oral Disease I 


9 


Oral Biology 


7 


Health Education Strategies 


2 




18 




Semester 2 


Prevention and Control of Oral Diseases 

II 
Educational Program Development 


7 


3 


Care and Management of the Special 


2 


Patient 




Methods and Materials in Dentistry 


3 


General Pharmacology and Therapeutics 


3 


Oral Radiology 


2 




20 


SENIOR YEAR 


CREDIT 



Advanced Clinical Practice I 
Perspectives of Dental Hygiene Practice I 
Community Service I 
Community Oral Health 
Introduction to Oral Health Research 



Advanced Clinical Practice II 
Perspectives of Dental Hygiene Practice II 
Community Service II (optional) 
Issues in Health Care Delivery 
Health Care Management 



Semester I 

5 

3 

1 

3 

2 

14 
Semesta 2 

5 



2 

3 

12 or 13 



JO • DENTA1 HYGIENE Nun; RAMS 



Three-Year Professional Curriculum Option 

Although most students complete the professional cur- 
riculum in two years as outlined, a three-year profes- 
sional curriculum option is offered. This three-year 
plan is a modification in the sequence and number of 
professional courses taken each semester. This curric- 
ulum can be an attractive option for students who may 
wish to lighten their academic load due to family or 
work commitments; or for students who are otherwise 
eligible to enter at the junior level but have not yet 
successfully completed all of the required preprofes- 
sional courses. Students admitted to this curriculum 
must have the recommendation of the program advi- 
sor and approval ot the admissions committee. Stu- 
dents enrolled in this curriculum may not have full- 
time status for one or more semesters of the program. 
This may influence their eligibility for certain scholar- 
ships and student insurance discounts. 

Application and Admission Procedures 

College students enrolled in the preprofessional cur- 
riculum should communicate regularly with the dental 
hygiene advisor at the Dental School to ensure that 
the courses selected satisfy the degree requirements. 
After completion of two semesters of the preprofes- 
sional curriculum, students may request an application 
from the Office of Records and Registration, 621 
West Lombard Street, Room 326, University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201; or 
from the Office of Admissions and Recruitment of the 
Dental School. Applications for the Baltimore campus 
should be received no later than April 1 prior to the 
fall semester for which the student wishes to enroll. 

A minimum grade point average of 2.3 in the pre- 
professional curriculum is recommended and prefer- 
ence will be given to those students who have high 
scholastic averages, especially in the science area. 

Enrollment at another University of Maryland cam- 
pus or completion of the preprofessional curriculum 
does not guarantee admission to the professional cur- 
riculum at the Dental School. Enrollment in the den- 
tal hygiene program is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be required 
to send a deposit of $100 with a letter of intent to 
enroll. This deposit will be credited toward tuition at 
registration, but will not be refunded in the event of 
failure to enroll. 



Projected Average Expenditures 

In addition to the expenses of tuition and fees which 
are listed on page 34, junior dental hygiene students 
should estimate spending $850 on instruments, uni- 
forms and supplies and $600 on textbooks. Senior 
dental hygiene students should estimate spending 
$750 on instruments and supplies, $300 on textbooks 
and $450 on regional and national board examination 
fees. Field experiences in both the junior and senior 
years may entail additional costs for travel and/or 
meals at sites outside the Dental School. 

Graduation Requirements 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in den- 
tal hygiene must complete the preprofessional and the 
professional curricula as outlined. Students must 
achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 and 
complete a total of 1 24 credits to be eligible for gradu- 
ation. 

National and Regional Board Examinations 

Clinical and comprehensive written examinations are 
given in the spring of the senior year. Successful com- 
pletion of these exams is necessary to obtain a license 
to practice dental hygiene. 

Courses 

DHYG 311. Prevention and Control of Oral Disease 

1 (9). The study of the morphologic characteristics 
and physiologic relationships o( teeth and supporting 
structures; and the basic foundation for clinical dental 
hygiene practice are presented in lectures, class dis- 
cussions and audiovisual presentations. Laboratory 
and clinical experiences provide the opportunity for 
practical application o{ the principles and procedures 
for the identification, prevention and control of oral 
diseases. 

DHYG 312. Oral Biology (7). The study of embryol- 
ogy and histology; anatomy and physiology; microbiol- 
ogy; pathology with emphasis on the head, neck and 
oral cavity; and the basic principles of radiology are 
presented in lecture, laboratory and audiovisual for- 
mat. 

DHYG 313. Health Education Strategies (2). The 
study of the elements of human behavior, principles of 
learning, methods o{ teaching and principles of com- 
munication as they relate to teaching oral health care 
to individuals and groups. Classroom discussions, 
small group activities and clinical experiences provide 
the opportunity for application of these topics. 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS'21 



DHYG 321. Prevention and Control of Oral Dis- 
eases II (7). The study of principles and procedures 
for the prevention of oral disease including dental 
health education, oral hygiene measures, dietary con- 
trol of dental disease, use of fluorides, sealants and the 
oral prophylaxis; and continued study of the etiology 
and control of periodontal disease and oral pathology 
are provided through class discussion and audiovisual 
and clinical experiences. Students work closely with 
dental students to simulate the postgraduation team 
delivery of dental care. 

DHYG 322. Community Oral Health (3). Methods 
of determining community oral health status, identi- 
fying harriers to optimum health, and selecting appro- 
priate barrier interventions are presented concurrently 
with community program planning activities. 
Throughout the course, the role of the dental hygien- 
ist in community oral health is emphasized. 

DHYG 323. Care and Management of the Special 
Patient (2). Through classroom discussion, reading 
assignments, independent study, group projects and 
community involvement, the dental hygiene student 
will develop a philosophy for the care and manage- 
ment of special patients for whom routine care may he 
complicated by age or unusual health factors. 

DHYG 324. Methods and Materials in Dentistry 
(3). An introduction to the science of dental materi- 
als, including the composition and utilization of den- 
tal materials as they apply to clinical dental hygiene 
procedures, dental assisting and patient education, is 
presented in lecture, class discussion and laboratory 
format. 

DPHR 325. General Pharmacology and Oral Thera- 
peutics (3). The study of drugs and their use in the 
treatment, diagnosis and prevention of disease; the 
absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and 
mechanism of action of drugs; and drug interactions, 
rationale tor use, indications and contraindications 
are presented in lecture and class discussion format. 
Emphasis is placed on the relevance of this informa- 
tion to providing patient care. 

DHYG 326. Oral Radiology (2). By means of lec- 
ture, laboratory and clinic activities, the students are 
introduced to the science of ionizing radiation; the 
production and effects of x-rays; and the various tech- 
nique of oral roentgenography. Students gain experi- 
ence exposing, processing, mounting, assessing the 
diagnostic quality of and interpreting radiographs. 
The rationale and practices to insure radiation safety 
arc stressed throughout the course. 



DHYG 411-421. Advanced Clinical Practice I and 

II (5-5). Clinical experiences in principles and proce- 
dures of dental hygiene practice are provided in simu- 
lated general dentistry settings through a concurrent 
patient treatment program with dental students. Stu- 
dents have the opportunity to experience and partici- 
pate in alternative practice settings through block 
assignments to dental specialty clinics within the 
school. 




DHYG 412. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene Prac- 
tice I (3). Senior students have the opportunity to 
explore advanced principles and skills of dental 
hygiene practice. The primary focus of the course is 
divided into three major units: pain control, advanced 
periodontics and myo-oral facial pain. Also included 
in the course is an introduction to intra-oral photog- 
raphy and case documentation. The emphasis of this 
course is to broaden the student's perspective of dental 
hygiene practice as it exists across the country. 

DHYG 422. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene Prac- 
tice II (2). This course provides an application ot 
principles and concepts for the planning and develop- 
ment ot the student's professional satisfaction and 
security. To prepare students tor the challenge of pro- 
fessional career development, such issues as career 
planning, continuing education, dental hygiene busi- 
ness practices and professional organizations are 
included. 



22 • DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS 



DHYG 413-423. Community Service I and II ( 1-1). 

The externship program provides opportunities tor 
senior students to select experiences beyond those 
given within the Dental School setting. The selection 
of the community site is based on the student's inter- 
ests and career goals. Sites include well-baby clinics, 
prenatal clinics, community health centers, nursing 
homes, senior citizen centers, facilities for the handi- 
capped, hospitals, military clinics and schools, day 
care centers, public health department and research 
centers. (DHYG 423 is optional). 

DHYG 414. Educational Program Development (3). 
Students in this course have the opportunity to 
explore various ways in which effective instructional 
skills may contribute to a career in dental hygiene. 
Learning experiences are designed to enable the stu- 
dent to develop these skills and to project their appli- 
cation in such areas as public school systems, commu- 
nity health programs, higher education and consumer 
education. 

DHYG 416. Introduction to Oral Health Research 

(2). This course is designed to acquaint students with 
research methodology and its application to the dental 
hygiene profession. Emphasis will be placed upon: 
heightening student awareness of the need for dental 
hygiene research; developing student capabilities to 
identify research problems and design and execute 
meaningful research studies; and enabling students to 
accurately appraise the quality of research reports. 

DHYG 424. Special Topics (1). Students are pro- 
vided an opportunity to pursue in-depth topics of spe- 
cial interest. The program of study is designed by each 
student and approved by faculty prior to the beginning 
of the course. The study program may relate to an 
area of interest in clinical dental hygiene, education, 
management or research and may consist of special 
reading assignments, reports, conferences, and possi- 
bly clinic, laboratory or extramural experience. 
(Optional) 

DHYG 425. Issues in Health Care Delivery (2). By 
means of lecture, discussion and small group activi- 
ties, students examine and analyze the issues that 
affect the broad spectrum of health care delivery. Top- 
ics of interest include inequities in health care deliv- 
ery, delivery systems in other countries, profiteering in 
health care delivery and professional rivalry. 




DHYG 427. Health Care Management (3). By 

means of lecture, discussion and small group activi- 
ties, students are introduced to skills essential for 
effective health care management. Areas of emphasis 
include women in management, managerial planning 
and decision making, fiscal control and grantsman- 
ship. Management principles are applied to dental and 
other health care delivery settings. 




DEGREE COMPLETION 
BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

The degree completion program provides the opportu- 
nity for registered dental hygienists who hold a certifi- 
cate or associate degree to pursue studies leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in dental hygiene. The 
curriculum is designed in two phases of full-or part- 
time study to meet each individual's academic, clini- 
cal and career interests. 

Program Requirements 

Phase I: General Requirements. Phase I consists of the 
student's previous dental hygiene courses and general 
course requirements, totaling 90 semester credits. 
General course requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree may be taken at any one of the three University 
of Maryland campuses (College Park, Baltimore 
County or Eastern Shore) or at another accredited 
college or university. These courses are listed in the 
Preprofessional Program, freshman and sophomore 
years. A maximum of 34 semester hours of transfer 
credits is granted for dental hygiene courses from an 
accredited program. To obtain transfer credit, stu- 
dents must attain a grade of C or better in all courses 
taken at an institution outside the Maryland state uni- 
versity system. Consultation with the completion pro- 
gram coordinator regarding transfer courses is recom- 
mended. 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS- 23 



Phase II: Degree Completion Requirements. The degree 
completion program at the Dental School consists of 
two core seminars (DHYG 410, 420) totaling four 
credit hours; senior level didactic courses, totaling 14 
credit hours (DHYG 412, 414, 415, 424, 425 and 
426); and 12 credit hours of academic electives, gener- 
ally taken at another campus. A variable credit practi- 
cum course, DHYG 418-428, may be taken for elec- 
tive credit. 

Curriculum Planning 

Registered dental hygienists should submit to the 
degree completion program advisor transcripts from 
their dental hygiene program and all other institutions 
attended, so that transfer credits may be evaluated and 
a program developed to satisfy remaining require- 
ments. Students should meet regularly with the advi- 
sor to ensure appropriate course scheduling in Phase 1. 

Application and Admission Procedures 

In addition to meeting the general course require- 
ments, the student applying for admission to the 
degree completion program at the Dental School 
must: 

1. Be a graduate of an accredited dental hygiene pro- 
gram; 

2. Have completed a minimum of three months of 
full-or part-time clinical practice as a dental 
hygienist; 

3. Be licensed in at least one state. 
Applications for admission may be obtained from 

the Office of Records and Registration, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore, 621 West Lombard Street, 
Room 326, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Applications 
should be received no later than April 1 prior to the 
fall semester for which the student wishes to enroll. 

Enrollment at another University of Maryland cam- 
pus does not guarantee admission to the degree com- 
pletion program at the Dental School. Enrollment in 
the degree completion program is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be required 
to send ,i deposit i)\ $100 with a letter of intent to 
enroll. This deposit will be credited toward tuition at 
registration, but will not be tefunded in the event of 
failure to enroll. 

Student Expenses 

Projected tuition and fees are listed on page 34. The 
amounts given on page 35 tor instruments, supplies, 
uniforms and textbooks are not applicable for degree 
completion students. Costs in these categories would 
be considerably lower, with minimal expenses for 
instruments and supplies. 




Graduation Requirements 

One hundred twenty (120) semester credit hours are 
required for the Bachelor of Science degree in the 
degree completion dental hygiene program. The last 
30 credit hours toward the baccalaureate degree must 
be taken at the University o( Maryland. Courses not 
offered at the Dental School will be taken at another 
University of Maryland campus. 

Courses 

See pages 22 and 23 for course descriptions of DHYG 
412, 414, 416, 424, 425 and 427. 

DHYG 410-420. Seminar in Dental Hygiene (3-1) 
(degree completion only). Reinforcement, updating 
and expansion ot dental hygiene professional skills, 
knowledge and attitudes. Topic areas which are 
explored through seminar, laboratory and extramural 
formats include dental public health, preventive den- 
tistry, process of dental hygiene care and options for 
dental hygiene practice. Emphasis is placed on devel- 
oping oral and written communication skills neces- 
sary for the dental hygienist in a variety of health 
care, educational, research or community settings. 

DHYG 418-428. Dental Hygiene Practicum 
(1-4/1-4)*. Individually designed didactic and/or 
clinical experiences in a special area of dental hygiene 
clinical practice, teaching, community dental health 
or research. 

'Elective variable credit course that requires approval of 
degree completion program coordinator. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM 

The Master of Science degree program in dental 
hygiene is designed to prepare dental hygienists to 
assume positions of authority and responsibility 
beyond those assumed by the graduate with a bacca- 
laureate degree and to provide a foundation for those 
who wish to pursue a doctoral degree. The program's 
approach to learning is student-centered, individual- 
ized and flexible. The faculty is committed to develop- 
ing creative professionals who assess and direct their 
own performance. Self-evaluation and self-direction 
are encouraged throughout the program. Students 
have the opportunity to share their experiences, 
knowledge and skills, work cooperatively with col- 
leagues and explore a variety of resources to help them 
reach their maximum potential as health care profes- 
sionals. 



24-DENTAI HYGIENE PROGRAMS 



Program concentrations include education, man- 
agement and community/institutional health. Stu- 
dents in the health concentration may choose to focus 
on acute/hospital care or chronic/geriatric care. 
Within each concentration, practical career-oriented 
applications of knowledge and theory are emphasized. 

The Curriculum 

Full-time students can expect to complete the gradu- 
ate program in 12 to 15 months. Part-time students 
usually spend 24 to 30 months in the program. Based 
on their career interests, students may select the thesis 
or the non-thesis option. Students in the thesis track 
must complete a total of 30 semester credits to gradu- 
ate; those in the non-thesis track, 34 credits. Under 
the guidance of a committee, thesis students design, 
implement, evaluate and orally defend a research proj- 
ect for a total of six credits of master's thesis. Non- 
thesis students, under the guidance of primary and 
secondary readers, submit and defend a scholarly 
paper. Students selecting the non-thesis option are 
required to gain applied research experience by partic- 
ipating in an established or developing research proj- 
ect. 

Dental Hygiene Core Requirements 







Non- 




Thesis 


Thesis 




Option 


Option 


Educational Program Development 


3 


3 


Health Care Management 


3 


3 


Literature Review and Evaluation 


3 


3 


for Dental Hygienists 






Research Design and Methodology 


3 


3 


Area of Concentration Practicum 


3 


3 


Master's Thesis/Research or 


6 


3 


Research Practicum 






Electives 


9 


16 


Total 


30 


34 



Electives 

Electives may be chosen from the courses offered by 
the schools and departments at any of the three Uni- 
versity of Maryland campuses in Baltimore, Baltimore 
County and College Park. Electives that apply to the 
concentrations of teaching, management and commu- 
nity/institutional health must be approved by the stu- 
dent's faculty advisor prior to registration. 



Expenses and Financial Assistance 

Tuition is $128 per credit hour for in-state residents 
and $229 per credit hour for non-residents. Additional 
fees are charged for some student services. Financial 
aid, in the form of loans, grants and work study is 
awarded on the basis of demonstrated need. A limited 
number of part-time graduate teaching positions are 
available through the department, and university fel- 
lowships are available from the graduate school. Part- 
time employment opportunities for dental hygiene 
practice are excellent in the community. 




Admission and Application Procedures 

Admission to graduate study is the exclusive responsi- 
bility of the University of Maryland Graduate School, 
Baltimore. The minimum standard for admission is a 
B average, or 3.0 on a 4-0 scale, as an undergraduate 
student in a program of study leading to a baccalaure- 
ate degree. Students who fail to meet these minimum 
requirements may be admitted to graduate study as 
provisional students. Applicants must be graduates of 
an accredited program in dental hygiene and possess a 
baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene or a related 
field. A personal interview with the program director 
is recommended but not required. 

Three copies of the application for admission, three 
letters of recommendation and two sets of official 
transcripts from each college or university attended 
must be received by the University of Maryland Grad- 
uate School, Baltimore, by July 1 for admission in the 
fall semester; by December 1 for admission in the 
spring semester; and by May 15 for admission in the 
summer semester. 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS* 25 



Core Courses 

DHYG 414. Educational Program Development (3). 
Students explore ways in which effective instructional 
skills may be used by dental hygienists in such areas as 
public school systems, community health programs, 
higher education and consumer education. 

DHYG 426. Health Care Management (3). Through 
lecture, discussion and small group activities, students 
are introduced to skills essential tor effective health 
care management. Areas of emphasis include women 
in management, managerial planning and decision- 
making, fiscal control and grantsmanship. Manage- 
ment principles are applied to dental and other health 
care delivery settings. 

DHYG 601. Seminar: Literature Review and Evalu- 
ation for Dental Hygienists (3). Through an analysis 
and critique of literature pertinent to the dental 
hygienist, students examine biological and clinical, 
research and political, sociological and educational 
trends that influence dental hygiene. Unanswered 
research questions are identified. 

DHYG 619. Teaching Practicum (2-4). Graduate 
students, working with a faculty advisor, gain experi- 
ence teaching in didactic, clinical and/or laboratory 
settings. An analytical approach to teaching effective- 
ness is emphasized. Placements in junior colleges, bac- 
calaureate programs, elementary or secondary schools 
or the Dental School are arranged according to each 
student's career goals. 

DHYG 629. Health Care Management Practicum 

(2-4). In cooperation with a faculty advisor, graduate 
students observe and participate in the administrative 
activities of a health care program. Placements are 
arranged to support the student's career goals. 

DHYG 639. Advanced Clinical Practice Practicum 

(2-4). Graduate students work with a faculty advisor 
in gain knowledge and experience in an advanced 
clinical area of dental hygiene practice, such as nutri- 
tional analysis and counseling, oro-myofacial pain, 
periodontics or orthodontics. 




DHYG 649. Research Practicum (2-4). Graduate 
students, working in conjunction with a faculty 
advisor, gain experience in research design and imple- 
mentation by participating in an on-going research 
project of interest to the student. Scientific writing 
experience will be included. 

DHYG 799. Master's Thesis Research (6). 

NURS 701. Research Methods and Materials (3). In 
one four-hour lecture/lab a week, basic understanding 
of the philosophy of research, the nature of scientific 
thinking and methods of research study are taught. 
Prerequisite: Basic Statistics. 






■DENTAL HYGIENE PIUH'.R A MS 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 



GRADUATE EDUCATION 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Science 
(M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees are 
offered by the Departments of Anatomy, Biochemis- 
try, Microbiology, Oral Pathology and Physiology. 
Master of Science degrees are also offered by the 
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and by 
the Department of Dental Hygiene. The most recent 
addition to the Dental School's graduate program is a 
combined DD.S./Ph.D in physiology, the purpose of 
which is to train students to become dental research- 
ers for careers in academic dentistry. 

Programs are also available for those who wish to 
pursue a graduate degree in one of the basic sciences 
concurrently with clinic specialty education. The 
combined degree/specialty training program generally 
requires three years for the master's degree and five 
years for the doctorate. These programs are highly 
individualized and are developed appropriate to the 
needs of the candidate. 

A Master of Science in oral biology program is 
available for graduate students who are enrolled in the 
certificate programs in the Dental School or any per- 
sons holding a D.D.S., D.M.D or equivalent degree. 
The program is a multidisciplinary one, in that the 
graduate courses necessary to satisfy the requirements 
of the University of Maryland Graduate School, Balti- 
more for the master's degree are selected from the var- 
ious departments of the university. Students receive 
training under the supervision and direction of a 
member of the graduate faculty. Courses in education 
have been added to various tracks equipping students 
to become more effective teachers of their specialties. 

The graduate school catalog and application for 
admission may be obtained from the University of 
Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore, 5401 Wilkens 
Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228. 

ADVANCED DENTAL EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS 

In 1970, when the Dental School moved into its mod- 
ern facilities, a comprehensive advanced dental educa- 
tion program was initiated. Over the last two decades, 
the program has continued to evolve to meet the 
demands of the profession. Currently, the school otters 
the following advanced dental education programs: 

• Advanced General Dentistry, a one-year residency 
program of dental school-based advanced study and 
practice. 

• General Practice Residency, a one-year program of 
hospital-based advanced study and dental practice. 



• Advanced Education Programs designed to provide 
successful candidates eligibility for examination by 
the appropriate specialty boards under the Commis- 
sion on Dental Accreditation of the American Den- 
tal Association. Programs of 24 months each are 
offered in the following disciplines: endodontics, 
pediatric dentistry, periodontics and prosthodon- 
tics. A program of 36 months' duration is offered in 
orthodontics. The oral and maxillofacial surgery 
program extends over a period of 48 months and 
also provides the opportunity for matriculation in a 
combined certificate/degree course of study. 
Qualified applicants for two-year certificate pro- 
grams may seek dual enrollment as candidates in com- 
bined certificate/degree programs. Successful candi- 
dates are awarded a certificate of proficiency in a clin- 
ical specialty by the Dental School and the degree 
Master of Science by the University of Maryland 
Graduate School, Baltimore. 

Applicants for all programs must have a D.D.S., 
D.M.D. or equivalent degree and must give evidence 
of high scholastic standing. Questions about individ- 
ual programs, tuition, fee schedules and application 
forms should be directed to the Office of Admissions 
and Recruitment, Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Dental School, University oi Maryland, 666 
West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Dental School offers an integrated professional 
development curriculum for health care professionals 
and faculty members. The program activities are 
designed to update, refresh and reinforce the profes- 
sional knowledge and skill of the practitioner. The 
clinical, biological, social and behavioral sciences 
related to practice are included in the course offer- 
ings. These courses are conducted by the school's fac- 
ulty, visiting faculty and distinguished practitioners 
from all sections of the country. Professional develop- 
ment courses are not intended as collegiate credit 
courses; however, the Continuing Education Unit 
(CEU), which equals 10 clock hours of formal instruc- 
tion, is a measurement used to verify attendance and 
participation in these activities. 

A significant number of the on-campus courses are 
laboratory or clinical participation courses. Off- 
campus courses are also provided for practitioners 
located in rural areas of the state. 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROCRAMS-27 



STUDENT LIFE 



STUDENT SERVICES 

Office of Academic and Student Affairs 
The Office of Academic and Student Affairs, under 
the direction of the associate dean for academic and 
student affairs, is the source of student information 
about the academic program and is the repository for 
records of student academic performance. The policy 
of the University oi Maryland regarding access to and 
release of student data/information may be found in 
the current UMAB Student Handbook issued to all 
incoming students. 

A major function of the office is to coordinate the 
academic counseling and guidance programs of the 
school. Departmental academic counseling and pro- 
gress reports are maintained and monitored. Records 
concerning counseling, referrals and disposition are 
maintained and serve as a resource for academic eval- 
uation by the faculty and administration. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, examination 
schedules and the academic calendar are disseminated 
through this office. Program information distributed 
to students includes handouts about the grading sys- 
tem, course credits, and guidelines for the selection of 
students for clerkship programs. 

Official class rosters and student personal data and 
address files are maintained by the Office of Aca- 
demic and Student Affairs, which serves as a liaison 
between the Dental School and the university regis- 
trar for the coordination of registration procedures. 

The office is also responsible for coordination of a 
computerized grading system which (a) provides each 
advancement committee with a composite report on 
all students in the class at the end of each semester; 
(b) provides, on request, class rankings and other 
evaluation data; and (c) operates in conjunction with 
the university's Office of Records and Registration, 
which generates and distributes individual grade 
reports, maintains the student's permanent record and 
issues the official transcript. 

Office of Clinical and Hospital Affairs 
All intramural and extramural clinical programs of 
the Dental School are coordinated by the Office of 
Clinical and Hospital Affairs. Major functions of this 
office include coordinating the schedules of faculty 
from the- various disciplines to each general practice, 
scheduling the rotation of students to special assign- 
ments, assigning patients to students, maintaining 
patient records, and assuming responsibility for qual- 
ity assurance, patient advocacy and clinical informa- 



tion management. 

Patient visits to the clinics ot the Dental School 
exceed 100,000 annually. Through the Office oi 
Clinical and Hospital Affairs, assistance is provided to 
students and patients who encounter difficulties. Cen- 
tral Materials Services, Central Records Systems, per- 
sonnel and financial management associated with the 
operation of the teaching clinics are additional 
tesponsibilities coordinated through this office. 

Office of Student Affairs 

The Office of Student Affairs is either directly or indi- 
rectly involved with all aspects of student life and wel- 
fare at the Dental School. Primary areas of responsi- 
bility include personal and career counseling and stu- 
dent advisory services. 

Students who experience career, health, legal, 
employment, housing and other personal problems are 
counseled by the assistant dean for student affairs and 
referred, as necessary, to the appropriate campus 
agency or office. In addition, counseling concerning 
specialty training, military service, internships, den- 
tal education and dental research careers is available 
to undergraduate dental and dental hygiene students 
through the Center for Career Development and 
Placement. 

The assistant dean for student affairs serves as advi- 
sor to all student organizations and publications and 
also assists in the coordination of joint student-faculty 
programs (professional, social and cultural). The Stu- 
dent Affairs Committee of the Faculty Council, 
chaired by the assistant dean, has the major responsi- 
bility for such programs. 

To effectively conduct all student affairs, the Office 
of Student Affairs maintains direct liaison with 
administrators, as well as campus, community and 
professional organizations and agencies. 

Student and Employee Health 

The school provides medical care for its students 
through Student and Employee Health, located on the 
first floor of the University of Maryland Professional 
Building, 419 West Redwood Street. Coverage is pro- 
vided around-the-clock by family physicians and nurse 
practitioners. Students are seen by appointment or on 
an emergency basis by calling $28-6009. For a yearly 
fee, students are entitled to the services of Student 
and Employee Health, which is able to care tor a large 
variety oi students' health needs, including counsel- 
ing. Students' family members can also receive care at 
a reduced rate. 



28 • S T U D E N T LIFE 



Housing 

Two campus housing facilities offer a variety of living 
styles on the UMAB campus: Pascault Row, a new, 
fully furnished unique apartment complex converted 
from early 19th century rowhouses, otters space for 
178 students; and dormitory style living is availahle in 
the Baltimore Student Union. The majority of stu- 
dents, however, live off campus. For them the Ott- 
Campus Housing Service offers a catalog of availahle 
rooms and apartments listed hy hoth students and 
rental agents and a roommate referral service. For 
information concerning housing, contact (301) 
328-7766, the Office of Residence Life, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore, 621 West Lomhard Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Athletic Facilities 

The Athletic Center at UMAB is located on the 10th 
floor of the Pratt Street Garage. The facility is 
equipped with one squash court, two racquethall/ 
handhall courts and two basketball courts which may 
also be used for volleyball. In addition, there is a 
weight room with a 15-station universal gym, single 
station universal units and a free weight room. Co-ed 
aerobic classes are offered and stationary bikes and 
rowing machines provide exercise opportunities. Both 
men's and women's locker rooms are equipped with 
saunas. 

Men's basketball, co-ed intramural basketball and 
volleyball teams compete throughout the fall and 
spring semesters. The Athletic Center also sponsors 
squash and racquetball tournaments. UMAB students 
with a current and valid l.D. are admitted free. For 
additional information, contact the athletic manager 
at 328-3902. 

The Baltimore Student Union 

The Baltimore Student Union serves as a cultural and 
social center for students, faculty, staff, alumni and 
guests. Activities hosted by the union include meet- 
ings, dances, movies and special events. The multi- 
purpose Baltimore Student Union houses the campus 
offices of Student Financial Aid, Records and Regis- 
tration, Student Affairs, USGA, Campus Life, Resi- 
dence Life and Off-Campus Housing. The Bookstore, 
Union Cafe, Computer Den, meeting and party 
rooms, lounge space and residence halls are also 
located in the union. 




STUDENT POLICIES 

Student Judicial Policy 

Statement of Ethical Principles, Practices and Behaviors 

• Each member of this community is obliged to carry 
out his or her designated responsibilities within the 
rules and governance structure adopted and agreed 
to by the community as a whole. 

• Faculty and students should be concerned with 
their own competence and strive to improve them- 
selves in the integration and transmission of knowl- 
edge. 

• In contributing to the information base of the sci- 
ences, whether verbally or by written communica- 
tion, students and faculty should present data, inter- 
pretations of data, and other facets of scholarly dis- 
covery with honesty and integrity. 

• Professional relations among all members of the 
community should be marked by civility. Thus, 
scholarly contributions should be acknowledged, 
slanderous comments and acts should be expunged, 
and each person should recognize and facilitate the 
contributions of others to this community. 

• Each member of the community, when acting as an 
evaluator of any other member, should recognize 
unprofessional personal bias and eliminate its effect 
on the evaluation. 

• The validity of evaluation shall not be compro- 
mised by any departure from the published and/or 
generally understood rules of conduct. Thus, all 
manner of cheating on examinations or the presen- 
tation of work assumed to be one's own but done by 
another are unacceptable behaviors. 

• An individual may challenge or refuse to comply 
with a directive whose implementation would not 
be in keeping with generally held ethical principles. 

• An individual should report his or her limitation of 
knowledge or experience if either limitation is likely 
to compromise an effort or expected result. 

• Faculty and students should seek consultation 
whenever it appears that the quality of professional 
service may be enhanced thereby. 

• Students should seek consultation and supervision 
whenever their care of a patient may be compro- 
mised because of lack of knowledge and/or experi- 
ence. 

• Students and faculty must merit the confidence of 
patients entrusted to their care, rendering to each a 
full measure of service and devotion. 

• All patients should be treated with dignity and 
respect. 



STUDENT LIFE* 29 




• An individual or group of individuals should not 
abuse their power by extending it beyond its defined 
or generally accepted limits. 

• To the extent practical, sanctions for violations of 
these principles shall affect only individuals found 
to have committed the violations and shall not 
affect other persons. 

Professional Code of Conduct 

This academic community has interrelated responsi- 
bilities of producing and disseminating new scientific 
knowledge, teaching, caring for patients, and educat- 
ing individuals to carry on these same functions. In 
carrying out these responsibilities, the academic com- 
munity needs rules to guide the maintenance of high 
standards. These must be nurtured by individuals 
with a developed sense of honor, integrity and intel- 
lectual honesty. It is incumbent upon the academic 
community to provide an environment which fosters 
these attributes in students and faculty members. 

It is important that faculty and students in a health 
profession realize that in our society the health practi- 
tioner functions mainly on the basis of self-discipline, 
rather than on imposed regulation, and receives a 
high degree of public confidence and trust. By accept- 
ing a Professional (.'ode of Conduct, which represents 
this trust, the faculty member and student demon- 
strate the desire to be fully prepared for the obligation 
to the dental profession and to the people served. As 
is traditionally expected of all health professionals, 
faculty members and students will demonstrate the 
highest standards of integrity at all times. Faculty and 
students are expected at all times to conduct them- 
selves in accordance with all codes, rules and regula- 
tions ol the Baltimore College ol Dental Surgery, Den- 
tal School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 




Student Offenses of the Professional Code of Conduct 
The following behaviors, while not all-inclusive, are 
examples of student offenses of the Professional Code 
of Conduct: 

• Unprofessional conduct. This includes all forms of 
conduct which fail to meet the standards of the 
dental profession, such as lack of personal cleanli- 
ness, use of abusive language or behavior in the 
presence of a patient or faculty member, disruption 
of class or any other school activity, and violation of 
the Dental School dress code. 

• Academic misconduct. This includes all forms of 
student academic misconduct including, but not 
limited to, plagiarism, cheating on examinations, 
violation of examination procedures, and submit- 
ting work for evaluation that is not one's own effort. 

• Dishonesty. This includes knowingly furnishing 
false information through forgery, alteration or mis- 
use of documents or records with intent to deceive; 
presenting written or oral statements known to be 
false; loaning, transferring, altering or otherwise 
misusing university identification materials. 

• Theft or destruction of property. This includes 
unauthorized possession or receiving of property 
that does not belong to you, such as instruments 
and books, or destruction of property not belonging 
to you. 

• Forcible entry into university facilities. 

• Intentional infliction or threat of bodily harm. 

• Possession of drugs or dangerous weapons. 

• Aiding or abetting. This includes conspiring with 
or knowingly aiding or abetting another person to 
engage in any unacceptable activity. 

• Violation of any codes, rules and regulations of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

The sections of the Student Judicial Policy included 
in this bulletin are intended to provide examples of 
the high standards of conduct expected of a profes- 
sional and the offenses against these standards. The 
remaining sections ot the policy describe specific 
examination procedures and procedures for consider- 
ing infractions against the Professional Code of Con- 
duct. The Student Judicial Policy in its entirety is sent 
to each admitted student. Acceptance to the Dental 
School is contingent upon the understanding and 
acceptance of the tenets contained in the Student 
Judicial Policy and Professional Code of Conduct. 



30 • STUI'I \ I LIFE 



Dress Regulations 

It is important to maintain a favorable and profes- 
sional image of the Dental School as a professional 
health care center. To that end, all levels of employees 
and students within the building are expected to dress 
and maintain a personal cleanliness that is consistent 
with a professional patient care oriented atmosphere. 

The following regulations apply to all employees 
and students. These regulations apply in all areas of 
Hayden Harris Hall and all affiliated sites during the 
business days when clinics and classes are scheduled: 

• Men will wear, at a minimum, clean, neat slacks 
and a collared shirt. Women will wear clean and 
pressed attire appropriate for a professional environ- 
ment. 

• In addition, in patient care areas and the Clinical 
Simulation Unit, men will wear ties and all will 
wear clinic attire approved by the Clinic Science 
Council. Informal attire such as denim jeans, ath- 
letic shoes or shoes without hose will not be worn. 

• Full-length laboratory coats are recommended for 
multidisciplinary laboratories and anatomy dissec- 
tion laboratories. 

• Surgical scrub shirts are to be worn only for the per- 
formance of specialty surgery. 

• Steps will be taken to control body odor and 
unpleasant breath at all times. Fingernails should 
be properly trimmed and clean. Hair styles should 
not interfere with the delivery of patient care. 
The primary responsibility for complying with and 

enforcing these regulations rests with the individual. 
Individuals in violation of these regulations will be 
dismissed from the laboratory, clinical area and/or lec- 
ture room by the supervisor until these regulations 
have been met. Department chairmen will ensure 
that these guidelines are complied with and enforced. 
A written incident report describing the nature of 
the violation will be forwarded to, and filed in the 
Office of the Senior Associate Dean, with a copy to 
the individual within one working day following the 
infraction. Subsequent violations of these regulations 
by a given individual will be forwarded by the senior 
associate dean to the appropriate body for action. 




PUBLICATIONS/ORGAN IZATIONS/ 
AWARDS 

Publications 

Dental School and campus publications include the 
semi-annual Forum, a magazine focusing on new 
developments and techniques in the practice of dentis- 
try and on the school's educational and research pro- 
grams; the VOICE, published bi-monthly; and the 
annual UMAB Student Handbook. In addition, the 
Office of Academic Affairs publishes a Dental Stu- 
dent Handbook for distribution to incoming dental 
students. These publications are distributed free of 
charge. 

Student publications include a yearbook, The MIR- 
ROR, published annually by student editors and staff; 
and a student newspaper, The Maryland Probe, pub- 
lished quarterly. Each year the Student Dental Associ- 
ation compiles and distributes a student directory. 

Organizations 

The Student Dental Association (SDA) is the organi- 
zational structure of the student body. The association 
is presided over and governed by elected representa- 
tives from all classes and is represented on selected 
committees of the Faculty Council. The organization 
participates in certain student-faculty activities and 
sponsors and directs all student social activities. It is 
responsible for the publication of the school's year- 
book, The MIRROR, and student newspaper, The 
Maryland Probe, and is unique among dental student 
organizations in having formulated its own constitu- 
tion and professional code of ethics. 

The American Student Dental Association 
(ASDA) was established in February 1971, with the 
aid of the American Dental Association (ADA). Its 
primary purposes are to secure scholarships and loans 
and to assist in other student-related affairs. Included 
in the ASDA membership is a subscription to the 
ADA Journal. 

Student American Dental Hygienists' Association 
(SADHA) members are involved in activities such as 
hosting guest speakers, conducting fund-raising proj- 
ects, presenting table clinics and maintaining liaison 
with the state and local organizations. They also par- 
ticipate in meetings and discussion groups on a 
regional and national level. Student representatives 
attend the annual meeting of the American Dental 
Hygienists' Association. 



STUDENT LIFE • 31 



The Student National Dental Association 
(SNDA), Maryland chapter, was founded in 1973. 
The primary objective of this organization is to foster 
the admission, development and graduation of black 
dental and dental hygiene students. Among the activi- 
ties in which the Maryland chapter is engaged are 
minority recruitment, tutoring, social and profes- 
sional programs, and community and university rela- 
tions. 

The American Association of Dental Research 
Student Research Group was founded in 1987. The 
objectives of the local chapter are to promote student 
research in dentistry and its related disciplines, to pro- 
mote the advancement of dental research and related 
aspects, and to further the aims and objectives of the 
American Association of Dental Research (AADR) 
and International Association of Dental Research 
(I ADR) as they relate to student research. Member- 
ship is open to all dental and dental hygiene students 
expressing an interest in dental research. Past 
research experience is not a requirement for member- 
ship. 

The American Association of Dental Schools 
(AADS) promotes the advancement of dental educa- 
tion, research and service in all appropriately accred- 
ited institutions that offer programs for dental person- 
nel. The association has three membership categories: 
institutional, individual and student. Student mem- 
bers receive the Journal of Denial Education and the 
Dental Student News, published by the association. 
During the year the local chapter conducts programs 
to promote the goals of this organization. Three Den- 
tal School student representatives (two dental and one 
dental hygiene) are elected to serve on the Council of 
Students of the American Association of Dental 
Schools. 

The Gamma Pi Delta Prosthodontic Honorary 
Society, chartered in 1965, is an honorary student 
dental organization with scholarship and interest in 
the field of prosthetic dentistry as a basis for admis- 
sion. The objective of the organization is the advance- 
ment of prosthetic dentistry through lectures, table 
clinics and other academic activities which will stimu- 
late the creative interest of students and the profession 
in general. 

The Gorgas Odontological Honorary Society was 
organized in 1916 as an honorary student dental soci- 
ety with scholarship as a basis for admission. The 
society was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a 
pioneer in dental education, a teacher of many years' 
experience and a major contributor to dental litera- 
ture. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name 
that the society chose its title. 




To be eligible for membership a student must rank 
in the top one-third oi his class, must have achieved 
and maintained a minimum grade point average of 
3.00 in all combined courses and must not have 
repeated for scholastic reasons any subject. Speakers 
prominent in the dental and medical fields are invited 
to address members at monthly meetings. An effort is 
made to obtain speakers not affiliated with the univer- 
sity. 

The Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, 
national honorary dental society, was chartered at the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery during the 
1928-29 academic year. Students whose rank for the 
entire course of study is among the highest 20 percent 
of the class are eligible. This high honor is conferred 
upon those seniors who, in addition to scholarship, 
have demonstrated exemplary character traits and 
potential for future professional growth and attain- 
ment. 

The Academy of General Dentistry membership is 
open to all students in the Dental School. General 
dentists share extraordinary experiences in lecture- 
discussion programs of interest to all. Meetings are 
held several times a year after school hours. 

The American Association of Women Dentists 
was founded nationally in 1921. The Maryland stu- 
dent chapter, founded in 1982, provides support and 
information locally to women dental students 
attending the Dental School. Lectures, group discus- 
sions, projects and gatherings with practitioners and 
AAWD chapters from other dental schools form the 
basis of the group's activities. 

The American Society of Dentistry for Children 
meets once a month and uses a lecture-discussion for- 
mat to discuss subjects as varied as nutrition tor chil- 
dren to N2O in private practice. All students are wel- 
come to join. 

The Big Brother/Sister Program is a voluntary 
effort on the part of each member of the sophomore 
class to help and advise a member of the incoming 
freshman class. It is hoped that this assistance will 
continue through graduation of each class. The pro- 
gram has been made an official standing committee of 
the SDA. 

The Dental Hygiene Big Brother/Sister Program is 
a voluntary effort on the part of each member of the 
senior class to help and advise a member of the junior 
class. It is hoped that this assistance will continue 
through graduation of each class. 

Students Supporting Students is a group of stu- 
dents available to help other students having difficulty 
coping with dental school. These students have taken 
an interest in learning how to help others with various 



32 • STUM h N I I I I I 



types of problems frequently experienced by dental 
and dental hygiene students. This group can provide 
peer support, referral, guided assistance and informa- 
tion related to student problems. 

The Christian Dental Association, a chapter of 
the Christian Medical Society, provides students with 
opportunities in the areas of community and world 
outreach programs. In addition to holding Bible study 
sessions and lectures, the group is forming a network 
between practicing Christian dentists and dental stu- 
dents. 

Professional dental fraternities are Greek letter 
organizations of men and women bonded together by 
ritual. They are specialized fraternities which limit 
membership to selected graduates and students 
enrolled and satisfactorily pursuing courses in an 
accredited college of dentistry. They are not honorary 
fraternities or recognition societies which confer 
membership to recognize outstanding scholarship. 
Their aims are to promote the high ideals and stan- 
dards of the profession, advance professional knowl- 
edge and welfare of members, and provide a medium 
through which members, with a common interest, can 
develop everlasting friendships. Representative chap- 
ters in the Dental School are Alpha Omega, founded 
in 1907; and Psi Omega, founded in 1892. 

Awards 

Awards are presented to senior students at graduation 
to recognize the following achievements and qualities: 

Dentistry 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the ten highest in the 
class 

• highest average in basic biologic sciences 

• highest average in preclinical studies 

• ethical standards, kindness and humanitarianism 

• professional demeanor 

• devotion to the school and the profession 

• characteristics of an outstanding general practi- 
tioner 

• the most professional growth and development 

• conscientious and enthusiastic devotion to clinical 
practice 

• high proficiency in clinical care and patient man- 
agement 

• greatest proficiency in oral and maxillofacial sur- 
gery 

• excellence in fixed partial prosthesis 

• excellence in complete oral operative restoration 

• excellence in practical set of full upper and lower 
dentures 




• outstanding senior thesis/table clinic 

• research achievement 

• achievement, proficiency and/or potential in each 
of the following disciplines or specialty areas: 

anatomy 

anesthesiology 

basic dental science 

dental materials 

dentistry for children 

dentistry for the handicapped 

dental radiology 

endodontics 

geriatric dentistry 

gold foil operation 

operative dentistry 

oral health care delivery 

oral medicine 

oral pathology 

oral and maxillofacial surgery 

orthodontics 

periodontology 

removable prosthodonncs 

Dental Hygiene 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the five highest in the 
class 

• humanitarianism, ethical standards and devotion to 
the profession 

• interest in and potential for active participation in 
professional organizations 

• interest and participation in the Student American 
Dental Hygienists' Association 

• outstanding clinical performance 

• outstanding leadership and participation in com- 
munity activities and student and professional orga- 
nizations 



STUDENT LI Ft • 13 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

To attend classes students are required to register each 
term in accordance with current registration proce- 
dures. Fees are due and payable on the dates specified 
for registration. Registration is not completed until all 
financial obligations are satisfied. Students who do 
not complete their registration and pay tuition and all 
fees will not be permitted to attend classes. A fee will 
be charged for late registration. 

Although the university regularly mails bills to 
advance-registered students, it cannot assume respon- 
sibility for their receipt. If any student does not 
receive a bill prior to the beginning of a semester in 
which he/she has advance registered, it is the student's 
responsibility to contact the registrar's office or cash- 
ier's office during normal business hours. 

All checks and money orders should be made pay- 
able to the University of Maryland for the exact 
amount of the actual bill. 

No diploma, certificate or transcript of record will 
be issued to a student who has not made satisfactory 
settlement of his university account. 

1990-91 TUITION AND FEES 



Dental Program 

Per Per 

Semester Year 



25 $ 



25 



Matriculation (new students)* 
Tuition (fixed charges) 

In-state 

Out-of-state 
Instructional resources fee 
Student activities fee 
Student health fee 
Hepatitis vaccine series'/' 
Hospitalization insurance* ' 

One person 

Two persons 

Family 
Supporting facilities fee 
Student liability insurance*/* 
Dormitory fee (double 

occupancy) 
Student Ciovernment 

Association fee' 
Graduation fee (seniors)'/' 

'( hw-lnnc fee. 
' 'The university's program or equivalent insurance coverage is 
required of all dental students m addition in the student 
health fee. 
'•'1989-90 fees. 



3,389 


6,778 


7,775 


15,550 


37 


74 


22 


44 


32 


64 


140 


140 


335 


670 


705 


1,410 


879 


1,758 


92 


184 


36 


J6 


1,013 


2,026 


10 


10 


30 


30 



Dental Hygiene Program 



Per Per 

Semester Year 



25 $ 25 



894 1,788 

2,868 5,736 

37 74 

22 44 

32 64 

140 140 

335 670 

705 1,410 

879 1,758 

92 184 

24 24 

1,013 2,026 



10 



JO 



10 



JO 



Matriculation (new students) ' 
Tuition (fixed charges)' * 
In-state 
Out-of-state 
Instructional resources fee 
Student activities fee 
Student health fee 
Hepatitis vaccine series*/* 
Hospitalization insurance' 
One person 
Two persons 
Family 
Supporting facilities fee 
Student liability 
insurance*/" 
Dormitory tee (double 

occupancy)' 
Student Government 

Association fee* 
Graduation fee (seniors)*/' 
'One-time fee. 

' 'Tuition figures are based on full-time attendance. Tuition 
for part-time students (8 credits or less) is $108 per credit 
hour for both in-and out-of-state students. 
The university's program or equivalent insurance coverage is 
required of all full-time dental hygiene students in addition 
to the student health fee. 
"" 1989-90 fees. 

Explanation of Fees 

The application and/or matriculation fee partially 
defrays the cost of processing applications tor admis- 
sion and enrollment data in the professional schools. 
These are not refundable. The application tee will be 
applied against the matriculation fee tor accepted stu- 
dents. 

The instructional resources fee is charged to pro- 
vide supplies, materials, equipment and to defray 
other costs directly associated with the instructional 
program. 

The student activities fee is used to meet the costs 
tor various student activities, student publications and 
cultural programs. In each of the schools that has i 
student activities fee, the Student Government Asso- 
ciation, in cooperation with the dean's office of the 
school, recommends expenditure ot the tee collected. 

The student health fee is charged to help defray the 
tost ot providing a campus health service. This ser- 
vice includes routine examinations and emergency 
care. Acceptable medical insurance is required in 
addition to the student health fee. 



34 • MATRICULATION POLICIES 



Hospitalization insurance is required of all full- 
time students. A brief outline of the student hospitali- 
zation insurance program is furnished each student. 
Students with equivalent insurance coverage must 
provide proof of such coverage at the time of registra- 
tion and obtain a hospitalization insurance waiver 
each fall semester. 

The supporting facilities fee is used for expansion 
of various campus facilities that are not funded or are 
funded only in part from other sources. 

Student liability (malpractice) insurance fee is 
charged all professional school students. 

The graduation fee is charged to help defray costs 
involved with graduation and commencement. 

Fees for auditors are the same as those charged for 
courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate and 
graduate level. Audited credit hours will be added to a 
student's total credit enrollment to determine whether 
or not a student is full-time or part-time for tuition 
and fee assessment purposes. 

Special students are assessed tuition and fees in 
accordance with the schedule for the comparable 
undergraduate, graduate or first professional classifica- 
tion. 

• A service charge is assessed for dishonored checks 
and is payable for each check which is returned 
unpaid by the drawee bank on initial presentation 
because of insufficient funds, payment stopped, 
postdating or drawn against uncollected items. 

For checks up to $50 $ 5 

For checks from $50.01 to $100 $10 

For checks over $100 $20 

• A late registration fee is charged to defray the cost 
of the special handling involved for those who do 
not complete their registration on the prescribed 
days. 

• The university reserves the right to make such 
changes in fees and other charges as may be neces- 
sary. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 

Students who want to leave the school at any time 
during the academic year are required to file with the 
dean a letter of resignation. In addition, an applica- 
tion for withdrawal form bearing the proper signatures 
must be filed with the registrar's office. The student 
must have no outstanding obligations to the school 
and must return the student identification card. 

If the above procedures are not completed, the stu- 
dent will not be entitled to honorable dismissal and 
will forfeit the right to any refunds which would other- 
wise be given. The date used in computing refunds is 
the date on which the application for withdrawal is 
filed in the registrar's office. 



m& 






*" 



Students officially withdrawing from the school will 
be credited for all academic fees charged to them less 
the matriculation fee, in accordance with the follow- 
ing schedule for the date instruction begins: 



Period from Date Instruction Begins 



Refundable 



Two weeks or less 
Between two and three weeks 
Between three and four weeks 
Between four and five weeks 
Over five weeks 

STUDENT EXPENSES 



80% 
60% 
40% 
20% 





A reasonable estimation of expenses for the 1990-91 
academic year for in-state students living away from 
home is $13,000; for out-of-state students, $21,500. 
These figures include tuition, fees, food, lodging and 
personal expenses excluding travel. To these expenses 
must be added the costs of instruments, supplies and 
books. 

Instruments and Supplies 

Instruments and equipment are provided through the 
Central Materials Services. A complete list of essen- 
tial instruments and materials for all courses is com- 
piled by the Committee on Instruments and Equip- 
ment. Half of the total cost of Central Materials Ser- 
vices is billed each semester with tuition and must be 
paid at the time of registration. 

The projected cost of Central Materials Services for 
the 1990-91 session is listed below to provide an 
approximation of the expenditures involved. 

Each year $1,521* 

Preclinical instruction fees &. equipment 

Year I 1,190 

Year II 975 

'Plus a refundable breakage fee of $200. 

Textbooks 

A list of textbooks recommended for first-year courses 
is mailed to incoming students during the summer 
prior to enrollment. Textbook lists for second-, third- 
arid fourth-year courses are circulated at the begin- 
ning of the academic year. The campus bookstore 
stocks these books; students may purchase books there 
or at other local bookstores. Approximate costs of 
textbooks and other instructional materials are as fol- 
lows: 

First year 

Second year 

Third year 

Fourth year 



$475 

425 

200 

40 



MATRICULATION POLICIES»3! 



Student Professional Insurance 

Dental and dental hygiene students in each year of the 
program are required to purchase professional liability 
insurance as a condition for enrollment. This policy 
also applies to all advanced dental education students. 
Undergraduate dental and dental hygiene students 
obtain insurance coverage through a group program 
for a reasonable premium. Information regarding pro- 
fessional coverage for students is available through the 
Dental School's Office of Clinical Affairs. 

DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE STATUS 

An initial determination of in-state status for admis- 
sion, tuition and charge-differential purposes will be 
made by the university at the time a student's applica- 
tion for admission is under consideration. The deter- 
mination made at that time, and any determination 
made thereafter, shall prevail in each semester until 
the determination is successfully challenged. 

Students classified as in-state for admission, tuition 
and charge-differential purposes are responsible for 
notifying the Office of Records and Registration, in 
writing, within 15 days of any change in their circum- 
stances which might in any way affect their classifica- 
tion at UMAB. 

The determination of in-state status for admission, 
tuition and charge-differential purposes is the respon- 
sibility of the campus Office of Records and Registra- 
tion. A student may request a re-evaluation of this sta- 
tus by filing a petition (available in Room 326 of the 
Baltimore Student Union). Copies of the university's 
policy are available in the admissions office and in the 
dean's office. 

OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY RECORDS 

Transcript of Record 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of their 
UMAB record from the registrar's office. There is a 
transcript charge of $3 per copy. Checks should be 
made payable to the University of Maryland. There is 
no charge for issuance of transcripts between Univer- 
sity "f Maryland campuses. A request for transcripts 
must be made in writing and should be made at least 
two weeks in advance of the date when the records 
are actually needed. Transcripts are issued in turn as 
requests are received. 






■ vtil 



Disclosure of Student Information 

In accordance with "The Family Education Rights and 
Privacy Act oi 1974" (PL 93-380), popularly referred 
to as the "Buckley Amendment," privacy of student 
records is assured. Specifically, the act provides tor the 
student's access to educational records maintained by 
the school, challenge to content of the records and 
control of disclosure of the records. A full policy 
statement may be found in the current UMAB Stu- 
dent Handbook issued to all incoming students. 

Diploma Application 

Degree requirements vary according to the UMAB 
school or program in which a student is registered. 
However, each degree candidate must file a formal 
application tor diploma with the registrar's office at 
the beginning of the term in which the student 
expects to graduate. This must be done by the end of 
the third week of the semester or the second week o( 
the summer session. 

A student who does not graduate on the originally 
expected date must reapply for graduation by the 
appropriate deadline. 

STUDENT HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

All students are required to have the campus-spon- 
sored student health and hospitalization insurance or 
its equivalent. Detailed information regarding the 
provisions of the student policy may be obtained trom 
Student and Employee Health. At the time of registra- 
tion each year, students must either purchase the stu- 
dent coverage or produce certified proof ot equivalent 
coverage. If proof of comparable insurance is not 
received at Student and Employee Health by Septem- 
ber 15, the student will be required to pay for the stu- 
dent policy for that semester. 

Students are required to document their immunity 
to childhood diseases, including measles, mumps, 
rubella and chicken pox. Information regarding spe- 
cific requirements will be distributed to each student. 
All enrolling dental students are also required to 
undergo immunization against hepatitis "B." Vaccine 
cost is included in the student tees. 



36 • MATRICULATION POLICIES 



UNA N C I A L AID 



Student tinancial aid programs are centrally adminis- 
tered hy the Office of Student Financial Aid, located 
in room 334 of the Baltimore Student Union. The 
purpose of the program is to provide financial assist- 
ance to students who otherwise would be unable to 
attend the university. To qualify for aid, the student 
must apply annually and meet certain eligibility 
requirements. Students should apply in January for the 
following year. 

Aid packages often include a combination of loans, 
grants, scholarships and work-study designed to meet 
100 percent of a student's needs. The student should 
call the Office of Student Financial Aid (328-7347) 
or stop by for fact sheets that contain detailed infor- 
mation on the application process and types of aid 
available. The office is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 




UNIVERSITY GRANTS 

In an attempt to meet the ever-increasing needs of 
students, the Maryland legislature each year allocates 
to the university funds earmarked for student assist- 
ance. As a result, university grants are available to 
Maryland residents who demonstrate a financial need. 
After careful review of the student's current financial 
situation, awards are made on an individual basis in 
the form of Dean's Scholarships, Desegregation 
Grants, Other Race Grants, and Tuition Waivers. 

ENDOWMENT AND LOAN FUNDS 

American Dental Hygienists' Association Scholar- 
ship and Loan Program. The American Dental 
Hygienists' Association administers two scholarship 
programs: the Certificate Scholarship Program for stu- 
dents entering the final year of a dental hygiene curric- 
ulum and the Post Dental Hygiene Scholarship Pro- 
gram for certificate dental hygienists who will be 



enrolled in a program leading to a baccalaureate 
degree. Dental hygiene students who will be enrolled 
or accepted for full-time enrollment may also be con- 
sidered for American Dental Hygienists' Association 
Loans which range from $500 to $1,000 annually. 
Repayment begins 10 months after graduation with 
7.5 percent interest on the amount of the loan out- 
standing. For further information about these scholar- 
ships, write directly to the American Dental Hygien- 
ists' Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, 
Illinois 60611. In addition, local chapters of the 
ADHA may offer scholarships and/or loans. For infor- 
mation, contact the SADHA advisor on the dental 
hygiene faculty. 

John Carr Emergency Loan Fund. This endowed 
emergency student loan fund was established in mem- 
ory of Dr. John Carr, a dedicated member of the Den- 
tal School faculty, and is available to dental and den- 
tal hygiene students who have an emergency need dur- 
ing their school years. Repayment of the loan is not 
scheduled until after graduation. 

The Dr. Gene W. Eng Scholarship Fund. This 
scholarship, which was established to honor Dr. Gene 
W. Eng, Class of 1963, provides funds to deserving 
first-year dental students for payment of tuition and 
fees. The criteria for selection shall not be dependent 
on high academic achievement, but shall be based on 
financial need and evidence of potential for success in 
the Dental School and in the profession of dentistry. 

All final candidates will be required to submit an 
essay describing their personal and professional rea- 
sons for applying for this scholarship. Students 
selected as entering freshmen shall be eligible for the 
scholarship each year while enrolled and in good aca- 
demic standing in the Dental School. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment 
Loan Fund. Under a provision of the will of the late 
Dr. Edward S. Gaylord of New Haven, Connecticut, 
an amount approximating $16,000 was bequeathed to 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore to aid 
worthy students in securing a dental education. 

The Russell Gigliotti Memorial Student Loan 
Fund. This fund is intended to provide financial 
assistance primarily but not exclusively to students in 
the preclinical years, for which costs are significantly 
higher because of required instrument and material 
purchases. Any undergraduate dental student who 
qualifies for financial aid, and who is unable to secure 
other university financial assistance, is eligible to 
apply. 



FINANCIAL AID* 37 



A maximum of $500 annually will be loaned to one 
student; no student may receive more than two loans 
during the period of training. Simple interest at the 
rate of 5 percent per annum will be charged, com- 
mencing three months after graduation. Principal plus 
interest must be repaid within 11 months following 
graduation. The fund was established in 1977 in 
memory of Dr. Russell Gigliotti, an alumnus and dedi- 
cated member of the faculty for more than 30 years. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund. This fund was 
established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni Associ- 
ation in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a 
member of the class of 1910. The fund is a source of 
valuable help in aiding students to solve temporary 
financial problems. 

Lawrence A. Haskins Memorial Student Loan 
Fund. This fund, honoring the memory of Dr. 
Haskins, class of 1970, provides loans to deserving 
students in the Dental School. Loans made from the 




fund shall bear 7 percent interest per annum to accrue 
with the start of the repayment period which shall last 
no longer than 10 years. The repayment period shall 
begin one year after the completion of studies. 

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation. During World War 
II the foundation granted to this school a fund to pro- 
vide rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

The Wilson B. Lau Memorial Student Loan Fund. 
Established by his wife to honor the memory of Wil- 
son B. Lau, this revolving student loan fund provides 
loans to deserving students in the Dental School. 
Loans made from the fund shall bear 7 percent inter- 
est per annum to accrue with the start of the repay- 
ment period which shall last no longer than 10 years. 
The repayment period shall begin one year after the 
completion <.! studies. 



The Sol B. Love Memorial Student Loan Fund. 

This revolving student loan fund was established by 
his family to honor the memory of Dr. Sol B. Love, a 
member oi the class of 1961. Loans made from the 
fund to deserving students in the Dental School shall 
bear 7 percent interest per annum to accrue with the 
start of the repayment period which shall last no 
longer than 10 years. The repayment period shall 
begin one year after the completion of studies. 

Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association. The 
Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association administers 
a loan program for qualified senior dental hygiene stu- 
dents. Information is distributed to junior students by 
the Department ot Dental Hygiene during the spring 
semester. 

The Dr. Joseph Anthony Pennino Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Under the provision of the will of 
the late Elizabeth Pennino, this endowed scholarship 
fund was established as a memorial to Dr. Joseph 
Anthony Pennino, class of 1928, to provide scholar- 
ships to deserving students in the D.D.S. program ot 
the Dental School. 

The Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship. The Depart- 
ment of Dental Hygiene awards the Patricia C. 
Stearns Scholarship to a student entering the senior 
year who has demonstrated academic excellence; will- 
ingness to serve the class, school and community; 
dedication to the profession; and high standards ot 
professional conduct. 

The Student Dental Association-Alumni Fund. 
This fund, created in 1960, was established for the 
purpose of aiding any student who may be in need ot 
an emergency loan. 

The following government, bank and private lender 
loans also are available to students on the basis of 
need: Health Professions Student Loan, Perkins Loan, 
Guaranteed Student Loan, Health Education Assist- 
ance Loan and Supplemental Loans. All require- 
ments, interest rates and terms for these loans can be 
found in the Office of Student Financial Aid bro- 
chure. 



58 • FINAN< I A I AID 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



DENTAL SCHOOL 

Administrative Officers 

Dean 

Errol L. Reese, B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; 
D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1963; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Detroit, 1968. 

Senior Associate Dean 

Warren M. Morganstein, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1966; D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1975. 

Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs 
Ernest F. Moreland, B.S., University of Georgia, 
1960; M.A., Western Carolina University, 1962; 
Ed.D., Indiana University, 1967. 

Associate Dean for Clinical and Hospital Affairs 

John F. Hasler, B.S., Indiana University, 1958; 

D.D.S., 1962;M.S.D., 1969. 

Associate Dean for Professional Development 
H. Thomas Chandler, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1957. 

Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 
Mark L. Wagner, A.B., Birmingham Southern Col- 
lege, 1959; D.M.D., University of Alabama, 1963. 

Director of Admissions and Recruitment 

James R. Swancar, B.A., Western Reserve University, 

1952; D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 1963. 

Faculty Emeriti 

John J. Salley, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Dean Emeritus 

Irving I. Ahramson, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Edward C. Dohbs, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Frank A. Dolle, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Pro/essor Emeritus 

BriceM. Dorsey, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M., DSc. 

Professor Emeritus 

Frank C. Jerhi, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

John P. Lambooy, Ph. D 

Pro/essor Emeritus 

Martin Lunin, D.D.S. 

Pro/essor Emeritus 

Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S. 

Pro/essor Emeritus 



if *■ ' 

OF 



KyrleW Preis, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Charles T. Pridgeon, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Donald E. Shay, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

John I. White, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Riley S. Williamson, Jr., D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Marvin M. Graham, D.D.S. 

Clinical Pro/essor Emeritus 

Faculty 

Abosch, John P., Lecturer, Oral Health Care Deliv- 
ery, B.S., University of Baltimore, 1966. 

Abrams, Ronald G., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, 
B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1958; D.M.D, 
Tufts University, 1962; M.S., 1966. 

Ackerman, Ronald L, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S., Howard University, 
1976. 

Agarwal, Sudha, Research Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.Sc, Agra University, India, 1966; 
M.Sc, 1968; Ph.D., Northeastern University, 
1973. 

Apicella, Albert, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1984; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1988. 

Altman, David W., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., Emory University, 1984; D.D.S., University of 
Florida, 1988. 

Arceo, Nilda, Clinical Instructor, General Dentistry, 
B.S.A., Jose Marti Preuniversity Institute of 
Havana, 1977; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1986. 

Archibald, David, Assistant Professor, Oral Pathol- 
ogy, B.S., Tufts University, 1975; D.M.D, Harvard 
University, 1979; DSc, 1986. 

Ashman, Steven G., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1970. 

Baer, Marvin L., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Prosthodontics, D.D.S., University of Texas, 1960; 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1967. 

Balciunas, Birute A., Assistant Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Notre Dame 
College, 1970; D.D.S., Case Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1975;M.S.D, Indiana University, 1979. 

Balis, Sophia, Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Athens (Greece), 
1957; D.D.S., University of Toronto (Canada), 
1966. 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY* }9 



Ball, Marion J., Research Professor, Educational and 
Instructional Resources, Division of Dental Infor- 
matics, B.A., University of Kentucky, 1961; M.A., 
1965; Ed.D, Temple University, 1978. 

Barata, Mary Catherine, Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., West Virginia University, 1983; 
M.S., University of Missouri-Kansas City, 1985. 

Barnes, Christine, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Barnes, Douglas M., Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1979; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Barron, Thomas, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., Northeastern University, 1984; D.M.D, Tufts 
University, 1988. 

Barry, Sue-ning C, Professor, Anatomy, B.A., Barat 
College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

Bartnyska Dunn, Linda, Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., Simmons College, 1979; 
M.H.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1983. 

Bashirelahi, Nasir, Associate Professor, Biochemis- 
try, B.S., Tehran University (Iran), 1960; Pharm. 
D, 1962; M.S., University of Louisville, 1965; 
Ph.D., 1968. 

Baumgartner, John C, Clinical Associate Professor, 
Endodontics, B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1966; 
D.D.S., University of Minnesota, 1970; M.S., 
George Washington University, 1974. 

Beach, Daryl R., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery/Division of Dental Infor- 
matics, B.S., Oregon State University, 1947; 
D.M.D, University of Oregon, 1951. 

Beckerman, Todd, Associate Professor, Oral Pathol- 
ogy, B.A., Emory University, 1959; D.D.S., 
Columbia University, 1963; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1987. 

Belenky, Michael M., Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Virginia Military 
Institute, 1955; D.D.S., University of Michigan, 
1961; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1975. 

Benevento, Louis, Professor, Anatomy, B.S., Ren- 
sselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1962; M.S., 1964; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1967. 

Bennett, Robert B., Assistant Professor, Physiology, 
B.A., Carleton College, I960; M.S., University of 
Nebraska, 1963; Ph.D., 1967. 

Bergman, Stewart A., Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery/Pharmacology, B.A., Brook- 
lyn College, 1964; D.D.S., State University of New 
York, 1968; M.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 



i£ 



•■--- 






1 



Bergquist, John J., Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Iowa, 1954; M.S., 1970. 

Blank, Lawrence W., Associate Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S.D, University of California, 1968; 
D.D.S., 1968; M.S., George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1974; M.S., University of Michigan, 1978. 

Bosma, James R, Research Professor, Pediatric Den- 
tistry, A.B., Calvin College, 1937; M.D, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1941. 

Bowen, William J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; 
M.S., 1959;DD.S., 1962. 

Bowers, Gerald M., Professor, Periodontics, B.S., 
University of Michigan, 1950; D.D.S., 1954; M.S., 
Ohio State University, 1962. 

Bowers, Jane E., Research Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., 
Towson State University, 1987. 

Bowman, John M., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University oi Mary- 
land, 1972; D.M.D., University ot Pittsburgh, 
1976. 

Bradbury, John R., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, General Dentistry, B.A., Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1969; D.D.S., 1972. 

Branoff, Ronald S., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, D.D.S., University ot Maryland, 
1966; M.S.D., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 
1970. 

Bress, Lisa E., Clinical Instructor, Dental Hygiene, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Brooks, John, Clinical Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1974; 
D.D.S., 1979. 

Brown, D. Michael, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
General Dentistry, B.A., St. Johns College, 1951; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1961. 

Bruce, Gregory S., Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., Medi- 
cal College of Virginia, 1988. 

Buchness, George F., Associate Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S., Cath- 
olic University of America, 1954; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity ot Maryland, 1961. 

Buxbaum, Jerome D., Clinical Professor, Physiology, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; D.D.S., 1955. 

Gallery, Patrick, Associate Professor, Biochemistry, 
B.S., University of Utah, 1968; Ph.D., University 
of California, 1974. 

Caplan, Carl, Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., LJniversiry of Mary- 
land, 1959 ; D.D.S., 1963; M.B.A., Loyola College, 
1 98 1 . 



40 • A PM IN 1ST RAT ION ANI' FA( Ul IV 



Cappuccio, Joseph P., Professor Emeritus, Special 
Assistant to the Dean for Alumni Affairs, B.S., 
University of Rhode Island, 1943; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1946. 

Carr, Sandra J., Dental School Assistant Professor, 
Dental Hygiene, A. A., Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity, 1964; B.A., Eastern Illinois University, 1974; 
M.Ed., Washington University, 1977. 

Chang, Yung-Feng, Professor, Biochemistry, B.S., 
National Taiwan University, 1958; M.S., 1960; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

Charon, Jacques, Research Associate Professor, Perio- 
dontics, D.D.S., Dental School of Lille, France, 
1971; M.S., Loyola University (Illinois), 1980. 

Christopher, Andrew, Visiting Dental School Associ- 
ate Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Manhattan College, 1943; D.D.S., Marquette Uni- 
versity, 1947; M.H. A., Baylor University, 1967. 

Chu, Khanh P., Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Chu, Ngoc Q., Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1984; D.D.S., 1988. 

Clemons, Gina, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1989. 

Cohen, Larry, Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Cohen, Leonard A., Professor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.A., George Washington University, 
1967; D.D.S., Howard University, 1971; M.P.H., 
Harvard School of Public Health, 1974; M.S., 
1976. 

Cohen, Michael, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.A., Emory University, 1984; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1988. 

Colangelo, Gary A., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., Western 
Maryland College, 1965; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1970. 

Coll, James A., Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1969; 
D.M.D, 1969; M.S., University of Oregon, 1974. 

Costello, Leslie C, Professor, Physiology, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 
1957. 

Courtade, Simon A., Assistant Professor, Biochemis- 
try, B.A., Wesleyan University, 1949; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1952; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester, 1965. 

Craig, James F., Professor, Educational and Instruc- 
tional Resources, B.S., Western Illinois University, 
1968: M.S., Indiana University, 1970, Ed.D, 
1972. 




Criado-Hedreen, Zully, Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Loyola College of 
Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1987. 

Crooks, Edwin L., Clinical Assistant Professor, Den- 
tistry/General Practice Residency, B.S., Randolph 
Macon College, 1967; D.D.S., Medical College of 
Virginia, 1973. 

Crossley, Harold L., Associate Professor, Pharmacol- 
ogy, B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1964; M.S., 
1970; Ph.D., 1972; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1980. 

Curley, Diane, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
West Chester University, 1976; M.S., Temple Uni- 
versity, 1982. 

DAmelio, Andrew R., Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
tics, B.S., Florida State University, 1978; D.D.S., 
Emory University, 1983. 

Dana, Allan H., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of 
Miami, 1959;M.B.A., 1961. 

Davidson, William M., Professor, Orthodontics, 
A.B., Dartmouth College, 1960; D.M.D, Harvard 
University, 1965; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 
1969. 

Delisle, Allan L., Associate Professor, Microbiology, 
B.S., University of California, 1960; M.S., 1961; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1968. 

DeMarco, Lisa A., Assistant Professor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1980; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

DePaola, Louis G., Associate Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1971; D.D.S., 1975. 

DeVore, Duane T., Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery, D.D.S., Loyola University of Chicago, 
1956; Ph.D., University of London, 1975; J.D, 
University of Maryland, 1979. 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY' 41 



Diehl, Charles Mark, Visiting Assistant Professor, 
Educational and Instructional Resources, Division 
of Dental Informatics, B.S., Kutztown State Col- 
lege, 1968; D.D.S., Temple University, 1976; 
M.A., Webster University, 1985. 

Di Fabio, Vincent E., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Xavier Uni- 
versity, 1967; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1971; M.S., University of Rochester, 1979. 

DiGianni, Joseph M., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, General Dentistry, B.S., St. John's University, 
1966; D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1970; M.S., 
1977. 

DiNardo, Hector F.P., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Loyola College, 
1949; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Dumsha, Thomas C, Associate Professor, Endodon- 
tics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1972; M.S., 
1976;D.DS., 1979. 

Eastwood, Gerald W., Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Prosthodontics, B.A., Concordia College, 
1955; D.M.D, University of Oregon, 1959; M.A., 
George Washington University, 1981. 

Edler, Thomas L., Assistant Professor, Prosthodon- 
tics, B.S., Howard University, 1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Eisen, Mark Z., Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1969; D.D.S., 1973. 

Eldridge, Roger L., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, General Dentistry, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1975;D.D.S., 1978. 

Elias, Samia A., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Prosthodontics, B.D.S., Alexandria University 
(Egypt), 1965; M.S., University of Maryland, 1985. 

Emberland, Joan, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1982; 
D.D.S., 1987. 

Epstein, Gary M., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1978; D.D.S., 1982. 

Exler, Alan S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University ot Mary- 
land, 1972; D.D.S., 1977. 

Falkler, William A., Jr., Professor, Microbiology, 
B.A., Western Maryland College, 1966; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1969; Ph.D., 1971. 

Faraone, Karen L., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Prosthodontics, R.N., University of Maryland, 
1974; B.S., 1974; D.D.S., 1978; M.A., 1983. 

Feldman, Sylvan, Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1962; 
D.D.S., 1965. 




Felthousen, Gregory C., Clinical Instructor, Perio- 
dontics, B.S., Old Dominion University, 1972; 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1976. 

Fink, Fred S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.A., University of Delaware, 1952; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

Firriolo, F. John, Clinical Assistant Professor, Gen- 
eral Dentistry, B.S., Adelphi University, 1982; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 

Fonseca, Olga, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
D.D.S., University of Costa Rica Dental School, 
1986. 

Foster, Ruth, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
A.A.S., Guilford Technical Institute, 1980. 

Franklin, Renty B., Professor, Physiology, B.S., 
Morehouse College, 1966; M.S., Atlanta Univer- 
sity, 1967; Ph.D., Howard University, 1972. 

Freedman, Gerson A., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
General Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1935. 

Fried, Ivan S. (Scott), Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Prosthodontics, B.S., University of Tennessee, 
1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1977. 

Fried, Jacquelyn L., Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.A., Ohio State University, 1968; M.S., 
Old Dominion University, 1976. 

Gamson, Edward K., Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
tics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., 
1986. 

Garber, Karen, Clinical Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., Northeastern University, 1978; 
D.M.D, University of Pennsylvania, 1982. 

Garcia, Anthony, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., University of Maryland, 
1985;DDS., 1989. 

Garner, Wilhelma G., Assistant Director of Admis- 
sions and Recruitment, Dean's Office, B.A., Fisk 
University, L966; M.Ed., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1975. 

Gartner, Leslie P., Associate Professor, Anatomy, 
B.A., Rutgers University, 1965; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 
1970. 

Gaston, Gerald W., Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery, B.S., Miami University, 1952; D.D.S., 
Ohio State University, 1959; Ph.D., 1972. 

Geboy, Michael, Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1971; M.S., 1978; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1978. 

Gerhardt, Donald E., Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1955; 
D.M.D., Tufts University, 1959; M.S., University 
of Texas, 1971. 



42 • A DMINISTRATION AND FA< Ul 



Gingell, James C, Dental School Associate Professor, 
General Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1968;D.DS., 1972; M.S., 1983. 

Ginsberg, Edward L., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.A., Western Maryland Col- 
lege, 1978; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Goldbeck, Raymond E., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1976; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 

Goldvarg, Arthur, Clinical Instructor, General Den- 
tistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Golski, John J., Clinical Associate Professor, Perio- 
dontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

Goodman, Harry, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Rutgers University, 
1972; D.M.D, College of Medicine and Dentistry 
of New Jersey, 1975; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1986. 

Gordon, Bernard, Special Advisor to the Dean for 
Journalism and Publications, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1948. 

Grace, Edward G., Jr., Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Mount St. Mary's Col- 
lege, 1960; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1964; 
M.A. Loyola College, 1981; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1987. 

Gray, Jonathan L., Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.S., University of Illinois, 1968; D.D.S., 
1972. 

Greason, Kathleen A., Instructor, General Dentistry, 
A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 1988. 

Greenbaum, Jack L., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
General Dentistry, B.A., University of New Hamp- 
shire, 1969; D.M.D, University of Pennsylvania, 
1973; M.A., San Diego State University, 1977; 
M.S., New York University, 1982. 

Gregory, Thomas, Clinical Instructor, General Den- 
tistry, B.A., Williams College, 1965; M.S., State 
University of New York at Buffalo, 1972; Ph.D., 
1978; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1985. 

Griswold, William H., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Prosthodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1958; D.D.S., 1963. 

Gunderson, Ronald B., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Prosthodontics, B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1967; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1971. 

Hack, Gary D., Clinical Instructor, General Dentis- 
try, B.A., University of Maryland, 1975; D.D.S., 
1979. 

Halpert, Lawrence E, Clinical Professor, Periodon- 
tics, A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

Hariri, Javid, Clinical Instructor, General Dentistry, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 



Haroth, Robert W., Associate Professor, Prosthodon- 
tics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M.Ed., 
1972. 

Hasler, John E, Professor, Oral Medicine and Diag- 
nostic Sciences, B.S., Indiana University, 1959; 
D.D.S., 1962;M.S.D, 1969. 

Hawley, Charles E., Professor, Periodontics/Microbi- 
ology, A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; 
D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1962; M.S., 
University of Illinois, 1970; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1976. 

Hemphill, Richard M., Clinical Instructor, General 
Dentistry, A.B., West Virginia University, 1954; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Henry, Eleanor M., Instructor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S.N., Our Lady of Angels 
College, 1972; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1988. 

Hendler, Nelson H., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Physiology, B.A., Princeton University, 1966; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1972; M.S., 1974. 

Hiatt, James L., Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.S., 
Ball State University, 1959; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1973. 

Holen, Sheldon, Research Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1955; 
M. PH., Columbia University, 1962. 

Hoi linger, Jeffrey O., Research Associate Professor, 
Anatomy, B.A., Hofstra University, 1969; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1973; Ph.D., 1983. 




Hovland, Eric J., Professor, Endodontics, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972; M.Ed., 
Virginia Commonwealth University, 1977; 
M.B.A., Loyola College, 1980. 

Hyson, John, Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1950; M.S., 1959. 

Hyson, John M., Ill, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.S., Loyola College, 1974; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1979. 

Iddings, John R., Clinical Assistant Professor, Gen- 
eral Dentistry, B.S., Roanoke College, 1962; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY' 45 



Iglarsh, Z. Annette, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Physiology, B.S., City College of New York, 1970; 
M.A.T., Alaska Methodist University, 1971; B.S., 
Upstate Medical College of Health Related Profes- 
sionals, 1975; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1983. 

Imm, Gary R., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1978; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1982. 

Inge, Walter H., Jr., Clinical Instructor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., James Madison University, 1977; 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1982. 

Irwin, Christina, Clinical Instructor, General Den- 
tistry, B.S., Portland State University, 1979; 
D.M.D., Oregon Health Sciences University, 1986. 

Jones, Omar J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Endo- 
dontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1973. 

Josell, Stuart D., Professor, Orthodontics/Pediatric 
Dentistry, D.M.D, Fairleigh Dickinson University, 
1974; M.Dent.Sc, University of Connecticut, 
1979. 

Junghans, John A., Professor, Orthodontics, B.S., St. 
John's University, 1951; D.D.S., New York Univer- 
sity, 1955; M.S., Tufts University, 1962. 

Kale, Bruce R., Instructor, Prosthodontics, B.A., 
University of Bridgeport, 1970; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1974- 




Kaplan, Jay S., Instructor, Endodontics, B.S., Univer- 
sity of California at Davis, 1976; D.D.S., University 
ot ( lalifornia .it Los Angeles, 1980. 

Kassolis, James D., Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1973. 

Katz, Nathan, Professor, General Dentistry, D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1948. 

Kelly, Maureen J., Professor, Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of Notre 
Dame, 1977; D.D.S., Columbia University, 1981. 

Khajezadeh, Daniel A., Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.A., Rutgers University, 1982; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1986. 



Kihn, Francis J., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., 
Loyola College, 1952; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1956. 

Kleinman, Dushanka, Professor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1969; 
D.D.S., University of Illinois, 1973; M.ScD, Bos- 
ton University, 1976. 

Koch, Douglas J., Professor, Endodontics; B.S., 
Union College, 1983; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1983. 

Kogan, Stanley, Associate Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1954. 

Kogod, Melvin, Assistant Professor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1958; M.S., Northwestern 
University, 1961. 

Kronthal, Alvin, Assistant Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1947. 

Krywolap, George N., Professor, Microbiology, B.S., 
Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S., Penn- 
sylvania State University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

Kula, Katherine S., Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry; Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics; B.S., 
University of Dayton, 1966; M.S., 1972; D.M.D, 
University of Kentucky, 1977; M.S., University of 
Iowa, 1979. 

Kushner, Melvin F., Clinical Instructor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., University oi Maryland, 1962; 
D.D.S., 1966. 

Lan, Chung-Fu, Visiting Clinical Ptofessor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., Taipei Medical Col- 
lege, 1970; M.S., National Taiwan University, 
1973; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1976;DPH., 1978. 

Lauttman, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1953;DD.S. University of Maryland, I960. 

Lee, Raymond J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1970;D.D.S., 1974. 

Leiss, Jeffrey, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B. A., University of Maryland, 1985; D.D.S., 1989. 

Leonard, Charles B., Professor, Biochemistry, B.A., 
Rutgers College, 1955; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1957; Ph.D., 190V 

Lever, Barry S., Clinical Associate Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954; 
D.D.S., 1958. 

Lever, Beth A., Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.S., University oi Maryland, 1982; 
D.D.S., 1986. 



44 • A DM I N ISTR AT ION AND FACULTY 



Levy, Bernard A., Associate Professor, Oral Pathol- 
ogy, A.B., Ohio University, 1963; D.D.S., Western 
Reserve University, 1966; M.S.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1969. 

Litkowski, Leonard J., Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; 
M.S., 1983; D.D.S., 1985. 

Long, Ross E., Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1970; 
D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1974; M.S., 
1978; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1979. 

Loza, Juan C, Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
D.D.S., Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, 
1988. 

Lusk, Christine O., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, A. A., Brevard College, 1960; B.S., 
University of North Carolina, 1963; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Missouri, 1976. 

Mandel, Bruce P., Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.A., Loyola College, 1975; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1979. 

Manski, Marion, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1988. 

Manski, Richard J., Assistant Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., Boston College, 1976; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1980; M.B.A., University of 
Massachusetts, 1985. 

Manson, Barry, Clinical Instructor, General Dentis- 
try, B.A./B.S., University of Maryland, 1982; 
D.D.S., 1986. 

Markin, Philip S., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1963; 
D.D.S., 1966; M.S., Loyola University of Chicago, 
1972. 

McDonald, Neville J., Assistant Professor, Endodon- 
tics, B.Sc, University of Otago, New Zealand, 
1975; B.D.S., 1978; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1987. 

Meeks, Valli, Clinical Instructor, General Dentistry, 
B.S., Thomas Jefferson University, 1977; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1988. 

Meiller, Timothy F., Associate Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1970; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1975; M.S., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1978. 

Meszler, Richard M., Associate Professor, Anatomy, 
A.B., New York University, 1964; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Louisville, 1969. 

Miller, Thomas E., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Prosthodontics, B.S., St. John's University, 
1955; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1959; 
M.A., George Washington University, 1976. 




Minah, Glenn E., Professor, Microhiology/Pediatric 
Dentistry, A.B., Duke University, 1961; D.D.S., 
University of North Carolina, 1966; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1970; Ph.D., 1976. 

Moffitt, William C, Associate Professor, Periodon- 
tics, D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1956; M.S., 
1964. 

Moldofsky, Frederick, Clinical Instructor, Prostho- 
dontics, B.S., University of Toronto, 1980; D.D.S., 
1985. 

Moreland, Ernest F, Professor, Educational and 
Instructional Resources, B.S., University oi Geor- 
gia, 1960; M.A., Western Carolina University, 
1962; Ed.D, Indiana University, 1967. 

Morganstein, Warren M., Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; 
D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1975. 

Morrison, Grace, Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1984;DDS., 1988. 

Mort, Kenneth E., Associate Professor, Prosthodon- 
tics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1967; M.S., 
University of Missouri, 1970. 

Murphy, James R., Research Associate Professor, 
Microbiology, B.A., Catholic University of Amer- 
ica, 1970; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1977. 

Mutzig, Kathryn S., Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
Ohio State University, 1979; D.M.D, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1988. 

Myslinski, Norbert R., Professor, Physiology, B.S., 
Canisius College, 1969; Ph.D., University of Illi- 
nois, 1973. 

Nauman, Robert K., Professor, Microbiology, B.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1963; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Nessif, Richard J., Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Marshall University, 
1973; D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1979. 

Niehaus, Carol S., Instructor, General Dentistry, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1984. 



Aim IN 1ST RAT ION AND FACULTY • 45 



Niessen, Linda C, Associate Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., University of New Mexico, 
1973; D.M.D., Harvard University, 1977; M.P.H., 
1977; M.P.P., 1982. 

Oates, Stephen, Clinical Instructor, General Dentis- 
try, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1984. 

Overholser, C. Daniel, Jr., Professor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of Notre 
Dame, 1966; D.D.S., Indiana University, 1970; 
M.S.D, 1972. 

Owen, David G., Associate Professor, Pediatric Den- 
tistry, A.B., Syracuse University, 1960; D.D.S., 
McGill University, 1964; A.M., University of Chi- 
cago, 1969. 

Palmer, James E., Clinical Instructor, General Den- 
tistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1961. 

Park, Jon K., Associate Professor, Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., University of Mis- 
souri, 1964; B.A., Wichita State University, 1969; 
M.S., University of Missouri, 1971. 

Park, Sarah K., Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1978; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Parker, Elaine, Associate Professor, Dental Hygiene, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1982. 

Pavlick, Charles T., Jr., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1961; 
D.D.S., 1961; M.S., University of Illinois, 1966. 

Payne, Thomas M., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Prosthodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1968; M.S., 1976; D.D.S., 1978. 

Peifley, Michelle A., Clinical Instructor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., Thomas Jefferson University, 1986. 

Perell, Ann L., Clinical Instructor, General Dentis- 
try, B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1980; M.S., 
University of Iowa, 1983; D.D.S., 1987. 

Phillips, Bradley L., Assistant Professor, Periodontics, 
B.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 
1974; D.M.D, Harvard University, 1976. 

Pine, Christopher, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1986; D.M.D., 
1989. 

Plessett, David N., Clinical Associate Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 
1949; D.D.S., Temple University, 1958. 

Provenza, D. Vincent, Research Professor, Anatomy, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

Pusin, Michael B., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
I lealth Care Delivery, B.S., Tufts University, 1964; 
D.M.D, University of Pennsylvania, 1968. 



Quarantillo, Frederick J., Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor, Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1969; D.D.S., 1973; M.S., George Washington 
University, 1978. 

Quintero, George, Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.A., State University of New York at Buf- 
falo, 1970; D.D.S., 1974. 

Raksin, Irving J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1960; D.D.S., 1964. 

Rauschenberger, Cindy R., Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.A., Augustana College, 1979; 
D.D.S., Univeristy of Iowa, 1987; M.S., Northwest- 
ern University, 1989. 

Reese, Errol L., Professor, Prosthodontics, B.S., Fair- 
mount State College, 1960; D.D.S., West Virginia 
University, 1963; M.S., University of Detroit, 
1968. 

Rethman, Michael P., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1974; 
M.S., George Washington University, 1982. 

Reynolds, Mark, Research Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1978; 
M.A., 1982;D.DS., 1986. 

Richards, Joan, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1987. 

Richardson, Brenda, Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
tics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1983; D.D.S., 
1988. 




Richter, Henry E., Jr., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1954; D.D.S., 1958. 

Robinson, Robert L., Clinical Instructor, Division of 
Dental Informatics, B.S.E.E., Drexel University, 
1972; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1980. 

Robson, M. Leslie, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.A., Idaho State University, 1977. 



46 • ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



Romberg, Elaine, Associate Professor, Educational 
and Instructional Resources, B.S., Vassar College, 
1960; M.Ed., Lesley College, 1963; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1977. 

Rosen, Paul S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.A., Lafayette College, 1982; D.M.D., 
University ot Pennsylvania, 1986. 

Rubinstein-DeVore, Linda, Associate Professor, Den- 
tal Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; 
M.A., 1982. 

Rubier, Constance G., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, 1973; B.S., 1974; M.S., 1975; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1979. 

Rudo, Frieda G., Research Professor, Pharmacology, 
A.B., Goucher College, 1944; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 1963; D.Sc, Goucher Col- 
lege, 1976. 

Rule, James T., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., 
Temple University, 1953; D.D.S., 1957; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1960. 

Ruliffson, Franklin R., Clinical Instructor, General 
Dentistry, B.A., State University of Iowa, 1949; 
D.D.S., 1954; M.A., George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1980. 

Sachs, Robert I., Clinical Assistant Professor, Perio- 
dontics, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1967; M.S., Purdue University, 1972; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1978. 

Saedi, Simin, Clinical Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, D.D.S., School of Dentistry, Tehran 
University, 1970. 

Samuels, Cheryl T., Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., Ohio State University, 1967; M.S., 
University o( Michigan, 1971. 

Sanders, Brian J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediat- 
ric Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1979; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1983; M.S., Ohio State 
University, 1986. 

Sandifer, Johnny B., Clinical Assistant Professor, Per- 
iodontics, B.S., Clemson University, 1960; M.S., 
1971; D.M.D., Medical University of South Caro- 
lina, 1974. 

Sauk, John J., Professor, Oral Pathology, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Detroit, 1963; D.D.S., 1967; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1971. 

Scaggs, Gary W., Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1972; D.D.S., 1978. 

Schmidt, Keith A., Clinical Instructor, General Den- 
tistry, B.A., Miami University, 1984; D.D.S., Ohio 
State University, 1987. 







Schneider, Lance P., Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.S., Long Beach State University, 1976; D.D.S., 
Medical College of Virginia, 1981. 

Schoen, Diane, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1976. 

Schreiber, Lela, Clinical Instructor, General Dentis- 
try, B.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Schunick, Howard E., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 
D.D.S., 1962. 

Schwartz, Harry, Clinical Assistant Professor, Pros- 
thodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 
D.D.S., 1965. 

Seibel, Werner, Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.A., 
Brooklyn College, 1965; M.A., Hofstra University, 
1968; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University, 
1972. 

Serio, Francis G., Assistant Professor, Periodontics, 
B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1976; 
D.M.D, University of Pennsylvania, 1980. 

Shelton, Preston G., Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.S., John Carroll University, 1963; 
D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1967; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1971. 

Shires, P. Jay, Clinical Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Richmond, 1982; 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1986. 

Shroff, Bhavna, Assistant Professor, Orthodontics, 
D.D.S., Pans V, 1982; M.Dent.Sc, University of 
Connecticut, 1989. 

Shulman, Eli M., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, A.B., Ohio State University, 
1942; D.D.S., 1947. 

Siegel, Michael A., Assistant Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1975; D.D.S., 1979. 

Siegel, Robert, Clinical Assistant Professor, B.S., 
City College of New York, 1954; D.D.S., New York 
University, 1958; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1983. 

Siegel, Sharon C, Clinical Instructor, Prosthodon- 
tics, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1975; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Siegel, Steven M., Assistant Professor, Orthodontics, 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1976; D.M.D, Tufts Uni- 
versity, 1980. 

Sim, Samuel, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., Towson State University, 1979; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Slade, Brenda E., Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1983; D.D.S., 1989. 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY -47 



Slotke, Noel E., Clinical Instructor, Dental Hygiene, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1981. 

Smith, Carol, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
University of Southern California, 1966; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1989. 

Snyder, Thomas L., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., St. Joseph's Col- 
lege, 1967; D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1971;M.B.A., 1974. 

Solomon, Eric S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Divi- 
sion of Dental Informatics, B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1969; M.A., 1973; D.D.S., 1979. 

Soltesz, Jennifer J., Clinical Instructor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.A., Ohio State University, 1982; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1989. 

Somerman, Martha J., Associate Professor, Periodon- 
tics/Pharmacology, B.A., New York University, 
1968; M.S., Hunter College, 1972; D.D.S., New 
York University, 1975; Ph.D., Rochester Univer- 
sity, 1980. 

Staling, Leah M., Visiting Research Assistant Profes- 
sor, Physiology, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1944; M.Sc, 1952. 

Stanford, Hilton G., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.A., University of 
California at Los Angeles, 1950; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1959. 

Stevens, Mark M., Associate Professor, Prosthodon- 
tics, D.D.S., St. Louis University, 1960. 

Strassler, Howard E., Associate Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., State University of New York at 
Stony Brook, 1971; D.M.D, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1975. 

Streckfus, Charles, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1970; M.S., Towson State College, 
1973; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Sutter, Mark, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
San Francisco State University, 1984; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1988. 

Swancar, James R., Associate Professor, Oral Pathol- 
ogy, B.A., Western Reserve University, 1952; 
D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 1963. 

Swanson, Jr., Ben Z., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University ol 
Houston, 1959; D.D.S., University of Texas, L959; 
M.Phil., University College, London, 1988. 

Sweren, Edgar, Clinical Assistant Professor, Ortho- 
dontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Sydiskis, Robert J., Associate Professor, Microbiol- 
ogy, B.A., University of Bridgeport, 1961; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University, 1965. 



Tate, Don L., Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
A. A., Community College oi Baltimore, 1975; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Tetzner, Emil W., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1978; 
D.M.D, University of Pennsylvania, 1982. 

Tewes, Ligouri, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1981. 

Tewes, Warren D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Gen- 
eral Dentistry, B.S., Randolph Macon College, 
1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1975; M.S., 
1982. 

Thompson, Van P., Professor, General Dentistry, 
B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1966; Ph.D., 
1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Thut, Paul D., Professor, Pharmacology, A.B., Ham- 
ilton College, 1965; M.S., University of Rhode 
Island, 1968; Ph.D., Dartmouth College, 1971. 

Tilghman, Donald M., Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1958;D.DS., 1961. 




Trail, Leo V, Clinical Assistant Professor, Periodon- 
tics, B.S., Mr. St. Mary's College, 1975; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1979. 

Trattner, Bradley, A., Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
tics, B.S., State University of New York at Albany, 
1984; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1988. 

Urbaitis, Barbara K., Assistant Professor, Physiology, 
B.A., Hunter College, 1965; M.S., 1965; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1968. 

Vail, Arthur E., Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1981; D.D.S., 1983. 

VandenBosche, Raoul C, Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor, General Dentistry, A.B., College of the Holy 
Cross, 1962; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1966. 



4* • A PM IN 1ST RAT ION AND FACULTY 



Vandermer, Jack D., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
General Practice Residency, B.S., Pennsylvania 
State University, 1963; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1967; M.Ed., 1973. 

Varipapa, Charles, Clinical Instructor, General Den- 
tistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; D.D.S., 
1984. 

Varma, Shambu D., Research Professor, Biochemis- 
try, B.S., University of Allahabad, India, 1955; 
M.S., 1957; Ph.D., University of Rajasthan, India, 
1964. 

Wagner, Mark L., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, 
A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1959; 
D.M.D, University of Alabama, 1963. 

Walters, Ray A., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Prosthodontics, B.A., Valparaiso University, 1954; 
D.D.S., Western Reserve University, 1958. 

Ward, Michael, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Towson State Univer- 
sity, 1974; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1977; 
M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1985. 

Warren, Denise, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Detroit, 1975. 

Waxman, Burton M., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.A., Clark University, 1973; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Weikel, Diana S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Gen- 
eral Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Weiner, Stephen A., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
General Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1965;DDS., 1969. 

Weisberg, Alan S., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, D.D.S., Georgetown University, 
1955. 

Whitaker, George C, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Prosthodontics, B.A., Earlham College, 1970; 
D.D.S., Howard University, 1974; M.S.D, Indiana 
University, 1977. 

Wiener, Nancy, Clinical Instructor, Pediatric Dentis- 
try, B.S., Old Domonion University, 1981; M.S., 
1982; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1988. 

Williams, George C, Assistant Professor, General 
Dentistry, B.S., Washington College, 1971; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Williams, George H., Ill, Assistant Professor, Dentis- 
try, UMMS, B.S., Tusculum College, 1962; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 

Williams, Henry N., Associate Professor, Microbiol- 
ogy, B.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Techni- 
cal State University, 1964; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1972; Ph.D., 1979. 




Williams, Lisa, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 

Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1978 

D.D.S., 1988. 
Wilson, Margaret B., Clinical Assistant Professor 

Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., David Lipscomb 

College, 1977; D.D.S., Medical College of Vir 

ginia, 1981. 
Wilson, Victoria E., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics 

A. A., Allegheny Community College, 1978; B.S. 

University of Maryland, 1985. 
Winne, Cynthia E., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 

and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Ohio State Univer 

sity, 1970; M.S., 1973; M.P.H., Harvard Univer 

sity, 1974; D.M.D, Fairleigh Dickinson University 

1978. 
Winson, Dennis E., Clinical Associate Professor, Per 

iodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 

D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1965. 
Wood, Morton, Dental School Assistant Professor 

General Dentistry, B.A., American Internationa 

College, 1965; D.D.S., University of Maryland 

1969; M.Ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 1979 
Wooten, Ruth, Dental School Associate Professor 

Dental Hygiene, A. A., St. Mary's College, 1969 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1971; M.S. 

University of Michigan, 1976. 
Wynn, Richard L., Associate Professor, Pharmacol 

ogy, B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; M.S. 

1966; Ph.D., 1970. 
Zeller, Gregory G., Clinical Assistant Professor, Gen 

eral Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland 

1975; M.S., 1983. 
Zeren, Karl J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Periodon 

tics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; D.D.S. 

1975. 



A DM IN ISTR AT ION AND FACULTY -49 



Zimmerman, John L., Dental School Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Educational and Instructional Resources, 
Assistant Director, Academic Computing, B.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1976; D.D.S., Tem- 
ple University, 1980. 

Zorn, Gordon J., Clinical Instructor, General Dentis- 
try. B.S., Drexel University, 1972; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1976. 

Zupnik, Robert M., Clinical Professor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1958; M.S.D., Boston 
University, 1964. 

Zweier, Debra R, Clinical Instructor, Prosthodontics, 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1983; D.D.S., 1988, 
M.S.W, 1989. 

Associate Staff 

Baier, Richard G., Central Dental Laboratory Ser 
vices, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1976. 

Foxx, Louis A., Director of Dental Laboratory Ser- 
vices and Dental Facilities. 

King, William F, Jr., Central Dental Laboratory Ser- 
vices, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1971. 

Land, Myra R., Educational and Instructional 
Resources, A.B., Goucher College, 1956. 

Lawson, Harvey W., Orthodontics, A. A., Commu- 
nity College of Baltimore, 1985. 

Organ, Robert J., Microbiology. 

Reynolds, James, Director of Fiscal and Personnel 
Affairs, Dean's Office, B.A., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1974; M.B.A., University of Rochester, 
1980. 

Suls, Frederick J., Central Dental Laboratory Ser- 
vices, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1972. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT 
BALTIMORE 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Ph.D., Acting President 

Malinda B. Orlin, Ph.D., Acting Vice President, Aca- 
demic Affairs 

Charles W. Tandy, M.B.A., Vice President, Administra- 
tion 

Stephen R. Max, Ph.D., Acting Vice President, Gradu- 
ate Studies and Research 

Judith S. Busky-Blackburn, Ph.D., M.B.A., Acting 
Vice President, Institutional Advancement 

Morton I. Rapoport, M.D., President and ( 'hief Execu- 
tive Officer, University of Maryland Medical System 






Errol L. Reese, D.D.S., Dean, Dental School 
Michael J. Kelly, LL.B., Dean, School of Law 
Richard D Richards, M.D, Acting Dean, School of 

Medicine 
Barbara Heller, R.N., Ed.D, Dean, School of Nursing 
David A. Knapp, Ph.D., Acting Dean, School of Phar- 
macy 
Howard Altstein, Ph.D., Dean, School of Social Work 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Board of Regents 

Margaret Alton 
Richard O. Berndt 
Roger Blunt 
Benjamin L. Brown 
Earle Palmer Brown 
Wayne A. Cawley, Jr. 
Charles W Cole, Jr. 
Frank A. Gunther, Jr. 
Ilona M. Hogan 
Ann Hull 
Henry R. Lord 
Joann M. McCartney 
George V. McGowan 
Constance M. Unseld 
John W T. Webb 
Albert N. Whiting, Ph.D. 

Central Administration 

Donald N. Langenbetg, Ph.D., Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity 

Jean E. Spencer, Ph.D., Deputy Chancellor 

David S. Sparks, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor, Academic 
Affairs 

Raymond J. Miller, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor, Agricultural 
Affairs 

Donald L. Myers, M.B.A., Vice Chancellor, General 
Administration 

Robert G. Smith, M.A., Vice Chancellor, University 
Relations 



50 'ADMINISTRATION AND FA< l ' I IV 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The Alumni Association is an independent organiza- 
tion of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Den- 
tal School, University o{ Maryland at Baltimore, rep- 
resenting almost 6,000 graduates worldwide. With 
headquarters in the Dental School and five chartered 
sections, the association is actively interested in the 
organizational structure o( the school. 

The annual meeting is held during Alumni Week 
and coincides with graduation. Each year alumni 
receptions are held throughout the country, and offi- 
cers of the association participate whenever possible. 
In addition, social affairs are held at the Dental 
School for the students and alumni. 

Yearly the association honors one of the alumni by 
bestowing its highest award, the Distinguished Alum- 
nus Award. 

Officers 

President 

Dr. Edwin Morris 74 
8870 Belair Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21236 

President Elect 
Dr. James R. Sullivan '57 
419 Burnt Mills Avenue 
Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 

First Vice President 
Dr. M. Eugene Hinds 
305 Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Second Vice President 
Dr. D Michael Brown 
1694 Justin Drive 
Gambrills, Maryland 21054 

Executive Director 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 

6810 North Charles Street 

Towson, Maryland 21204 

Secretary 

Dr. Robert W Haroth '58 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 




Treasurer 

Dr. George H. Williams III '66 

12116 Jerusalem Road 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 

Editor 

Dr. Frank J. Romeo '66 

305 Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

His torian-Archwis t 
Mr. Gardner PH. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

Past President 
Dr. Howard Schunick '62 
409 Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



ALUMNI AS S O C I AT I O N 



POLICY STATEMENTS 



FACULTY, STUDENT AND 
INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ACADEMIC 
INTEGRITY 

Preamble 

At the heart of the academic enterprise are learning, 
teaching and scholarship. In universities these are 
exemplified by reasoned discussion between student 
and teacher, a mutual respect for the learning and 
teaching process, and intellectual honesty in the pur- 
suit of new knowledge. In the traditions of the aca- 
demic enterprise, students and teachers have certain 
rights and responsibilities which they bring to the aca- 
demic community. While the following statements do 
not imply a contract between the teacher or the uni- 
versity and the student, they are nevertheless conven- 
tions which the university believes to be central to the 
learning and teaching process. 

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Faculty shall share with students and administra- 
tion the responsibility for academic integrity. 

2. Faculty are accorded freedom in the classroom to 
discuss subject matter reasonably related to the 
course. In turn they have the responsibility to 
encourage free and honest inquiry and expression 
on the part of students. 

3. Faculty are responsible for the structure and con- 
tent of their courses, but they have responsibility 
to present courses that are consistent with their 
descriptions in the university catalog. In addition, 
faculty have the obligation to make students aware 
of the expectations in the course, the evaluation 
procedures and the grading policy. 

4. Faculty are obligated to evaluate students fairly 
and equitably in a manner appropriate to the 
course and its objectives. Grades shall be assigned 
without prejudice or bias. 

5. Faculty shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent 
the occurrence of academic dishonesty through 
the appropriate design and administration of 
assignments and examinations, through the care- 
ful safeguarding of course materials and examina- 
tions, and through regular reassessment of evalua- 
tion procedures. 

6. When instances of academic dishonesty are sus- 
pected, faculty shall have the right and responsi- 
bility to see that appropriate action is taken in 
accordance with university regulations. 



Student Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Students shall share with faculty and administra- 
tion the responsibility for academic integrity. 

2. Students shall have the right oi inquiry and 
expression in their courses without prejudice or 
bias. In addition, students shall have the right to 
know the requirements of their courses and to 
know the manner in which they will be evaluated 
and graded. 

3. Students shall have the obligation to complete the 
requirements of their courses in the time and man- 
net prescribed and to submit to evaluation of their 
work. 

4. Students shall have the right to be evaluated fairly 
and equitably in a manner appropriate to the 
course and its objectives. 

5. Students shall not submit as their own work any 
work which has been prepared by others. Outside 
assistance in the preparation of this work, such as 
librarian assistance, tutorial assistance, typing 
assistance, or such assistance as may be specified or 
approved by the instructor is allowed. 

6. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to pre- 
vent the occurrence of academic dishonesty. They 
shall by their own example encourage academic 
integrity and shall themselves refrain from acts of 
cheating and plagiarism or other acts of academic 
dishonesty. 

7. When instances of academic dishonesty are sus- 
pected, students shall have the right and responsi- 
bility to bring this to the attention of the faculty or 
other appropriate authority. 

Institutional Responsibility 

1. Campuses or appropriate administrative units oi 
the University of Maryland shall take appropriate 
measures to foster academic integrity in the class- 
room. 

2. Campuses or appropriate administrative units shall 
take steps to define acts of academic dishonesty, to 
insure procedures for due process for students 
accused or suspected of acts of academic dishon- 
esty, and to impose appropriate sanctions on stu- 
dents guilty of acts of academic dishonesty. 

3. Campuses or appropriate administrative units shall 
take steps to determine how admission or matricu- 
lation shall be affected by acts of academic dishon- 
esty on another campus or at another institution. 
No students suspended for disciplinary reasons at 
any campus of the University of Maryland shall be 
admitted to any other University of Maryland 
campus during the period of suspension. 



52 • POLICY STATEMENTS 



HUMAN RELATIONS CODE SUMMARY 

UMAB has a Human Relations Code for use by the 
entire campus community. The code represents 
UMAB's commitment to human relations issues. The 
specific purposes of the code include: 

1. Prevention or elimination of unlawful discrimina- 
tion on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, sexual 
orientation, marital status, age, ancestry or 
national origin, physical or mental handicap, or 
exercise of rights secured by the First Amendment 
of the U.S. Constitution; and 

2. Establishing a timely, effective grievance proce- 
dure as an alternative to more lengthy formal proc- 
esses for resolution of human relations issues. 

A Human Relations Committee was created to 
oversee the code. It is comprised of campus faculty, 
administrators and students and is advisory to the 
president of the campus. The committee may institute 
educational programs and provide an open forum on 
human relations issues. In addition, the committee is 
charged with maintaining a mediation, investigation 
and hearing process for specific complaints of discrim- 
ination brought by students, faculty or staff. The code 
describes the particulars of the hearing process. It is 
the intent of the code to provide a grievance proce- 
dure for any individual on campus who wants a cross- 
section of the campus community to investigate and 
mediate a problem without having to resort to com- 
plaints to external agencies such as the Maryland 
Commission on Human Relations, complaints under 
personnel rules or lawsuits. 

Copies of the Human Relations Code are available 
in the dean's office, the student affairs and USGA 
offices in the Baltimore Student Union, and the per- 
sonnel and affirmative action offices in the adminis- 
tration building. 



SERVICE TO THOSE WITH INFECTIOUS 
DISEASES 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Balti- 
more to provide education and training to students for 
the purpose of providing care and service to all per- 
sons. The institution will employ appropriate precau- 
tions to protect providers in a manner meeting the 
patients' or clients' requirements, yet protecting the 
interest of students and faculty participating in the 
provision of such care or service. 

No student will be permitted to refuse to provide 
care or service to any assigned person in the absence 
of special circumstances placing the student at 
increased risk for an infectious disease. Any student 
who refuses to treat or serve an assigned person with- 
out prior consent of the school involved will be subject 
to penalties under appropriate academic procedures, 
such penalties to include suspension or dismissal. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
POSITION ON ACTS OF VIOLENCE 
AND EXTREMISM WHICH ARE 
RACIALLY, ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY 
OR POLITICALLY MOTIVATED. 

The Board of Regents strongly condemns criminal 
acts of destruction or violence against the person or 
property of others. Individuals committing such acts 
at any campus or facility of the university will be sub- 
ject to swift campus judicial and personnel action, 
including possible expulsion or termination, as well as 
possible state criminal proceedings. 

No provision of this publication shall he construed as a 
contract between any applicant or student and the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. The university reserves the right to 
change any admission or advancement requirement at any 
time. The university further reserves the right to ask a stu- 
dent to withdraw at any time when it is considered to be in 
the best interest of the university. 



POLICY STATEMENTS • 53 



CAMPUS MAPS 



University and Campu 
Buildings 



1. Administration Building 

737 W. Lombard St. (FP 

2. Allied Health Professions Building 
32 S. Greene St. (E-F4) 

3. Baltimore Student Ul 
621 W.Lombard St. (F3-4) 

4 (Walter P.) Carter Center 
630 W.Fayette St. (C2-3) 

5. Davidge Hall 
522 W.Lombard St. lF4-i I 

6. Dental School, Hayden Harris Hall 
666 W. Baltimore St. (C-D2) 

7 Downtown Baltimore Child ( 'are 
Lexington and Arch Srv (A3) 

8. Dunning Hall 
636 W. Lombard St. (F3) 

9. East Hall 
520 W Lombard St. (F5) 

lO.Grav Laboratory 

520 W. Lombard St. (E5) 
1 1 .Greene Street Building 

29 S.Greene St. (E4-5) 
12. Health Sciences Building 

610 W. Lombard St. (F4) 

1 3. Health Sciences Library 

111 S.Greene St. (F4) 
14. Hope Lodge 

636 W. Lexington St. (A-B3) 
15. Howard Hall 

660 W. Redwood St. (D-E2) 
16. Institute of Psychiatry and 

Human Behavior 
_ 645 W. Redwood St. (E3) 
17. Kelly Memorial Building 
Lombard St (F2) 
18. Law School and 

Marshall Law Library 

500 W. Baltimore St. (C-D5) 
19. Lombard Building 

511 W. Lombard St. (F5) 
20. Maryland Bar Center 

520 W. Fayette St. (C4) 

2 i Medical School, Frank C. 

Bressler Research Building ~ 

655 W. Baltimore St. (D2-3)~ 
22 Medic .il School 

Teaching Facility 

10 S. Pine Si (D-El) 
il Technology 

31 S.Greene St (E4) 
24.Newman (.'enter 

712 V. 

ig School 

655 W.Lombard St. (F2-3) 
26. Parsons Hall 

ili Row 

651-655 V\ Lexingi 
- I harmacyHall 

20 N.Pine St. (Dl) 
29.Pine Street Polici 5l iti, 

214 N. Pine St. (Al) 
30. Pratt Street Garagi ind 

Athletic ( i mi r 

646 W.Pratt (G3) 
31. R Adams* owley Shod 

I III. T 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



32. Redwood Hall 

33.R<m.il.l Mi Donald Housi 

i, I Work 

525 W 

Hou ■ 
513 W. Lombard Si (F5) 

Examiner's Buil ling 
I I I Perm Si fj 
. i nr ■ i n Hi ilth < entei 
120 S.Greene St. ((.4) 
I iryland 

t.(E3-4) 




Penn and Redv id I 'I !) 59.1 Iniversity of Maryland 



Pinlessuin.il BuiLlmg 
The University ( Hub 

i i-21 W Red« ISi (E5) 

- ii II, , Mi.l I larage 
Redwood and( ireem Sts. (PS) 
ersity Square Building 
Pa, i -i (I .i 

i [ration 

Medii al ( i 

Baltimore and Greeni Sts « D3) 

■■ Hi ilthi enti i 
700W. LomkuJ St.(F2) 
H W, mini tei IL" 

515 W. Fayetti Si (I 4> 
45.Whitehursi Hall 
624 W. Loml ird (F3) 



46. 108 N.Greene St. Building (C4) 

405 W. Redwood Si Building (E6) 
48 701 W Prati St. Building (( 12) 

B UMAB/I MP Shuttli Stop (F4) 
T Baltimore [Volley 

Works to Innei I [arboi (G5) 
1 L • ingt, hi M up i (A5) 
S Metro Subway Station (lis) 



□ 



Campus Related Bu 



5 I 

Parking Facilities 
Dental Patient Lot (C-D3) 
Koestei sLoi (A B3) 
I i Kingti 'ii Ni, ei < ' u igi (A B2) 
Lombard Square (F2) 
Nursing Lot (F2 i) 

Pi nil . ,i ,", (B-< 5) 

Pine Street Lots(A-Bl) 
Pratt Street Garagi (G3) 
lempo/1 lealth < ent< rLot (G4) 
P10 I niversity Garage (E2) 

I'll I 'imeiMtv PI.,:. i l i.irage 

Visitoi Parking (D E, 4-5) 
PR Private Parking Facilities (( 5.F5) 




DIRECTIONS TO THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

From north of Baltimore: south on 1-95 through Fort 
McHenry Tunnel to Route 395 (downtown Baltimore) 
and exit onto Martin Luther King, Jr., Boulevard stay- 
Big in right lane. At third traffic light, turn right onto 
Baltimore Street; turn right at first traffic light onto 
Greene Street; turn left at next traffic light onto Red- 
wood Street and immediately into the entrance for the 
underground University Plaia Garage. 

From south of Baltimore: north on 1-95 to Russell 
Street exit. North on Russell Street (which becomes 
Paca Street) through eight traffic lights to Redwood 
Street. Turn left on Redwood Street and immediately 
into the entrance tor the underground University 
Plaza Garage. 

MTA buses numbered 1, 7, 8, 9, 11, 15, 20, 23, 30, 
31,35 and 36 all stop in the campus area. 

The nearest subway >top is at Lexington Market, cor- 
ner of Eutaw and Lexington Streets. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1990-91 

August 27-28 
August 29 

September 3 
September 4 

November 22-23 
December 17-21 
December 24-January 
1, 1991 
January 2-22 
Januarv 21 

January 23 
March' 25-29 
May 16-22 
May 24 



Freshman orientation 
First semester begins — 

dentistry 
Labor Day (school closed) 
First semester begins — dental 

hygiene 
Thanksgiving recess 
Exam week 
Christmas recess 

Minimester 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 

(school closed) 
Second semester begins 
Spring vacation 
Exam week 
Commencement 



1991-92 



August 26-27 
August 28 

September 2 
September 3 

November 28-29 
December 16-20 
December 2 3 -January 
3, 1992 
January 6-24 
January 20 

January 27 
March 16-20 

May 15-21 
May 22 



Freshman orientation 
First semester begins — 

dentistry 
Labor Day (school closed) 
First semester begins — 

dental hygiene 
Thanksgiving recess 
Exam week 
Christmas recess 

Minimester 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 

(school closed) 
Second semester begins 
Spring vacation 
Exam week 
Commencement 



These schedules are subject to change, and are provided 
only for general information concerning die length of terms 

and holidays 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 









■ 






i< 



Dental School 
1992-94 









Catalog 


- 


Kv> 







jrfn 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
Dental School 
University of Maryland 
666 West Baltimore Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



The I University oj Maryland at Baltimore is accredited 
by the Middle States \ss( k iatit mo/G dleges and 

I he I Cental Sc hi \ol is ai i redited b} the ( '■> im- 
missicm on \a reditation oj Dental and I hntal Auxil- 

itional Programs oj the ( 'ouncil on I )ental 
Education oj the American Dental Association. 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to be administered, and no less important, 
human relationships developed between teachers and students and between students 
and patients. If ever patients are regarded as clinical material, this building will have 
been degraded and its use corrupted. We must never forget that the word patient comes 
from the Latin root which means to suffer. Clinical material does not suffer. Human 
beings do." 

From the address of Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 
Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Regents 
University of Maryland 
Dedication of Hayden-Hams Hall 
March 5, 1971 

"The University is the rear guard and the advance agent of society. It lives in the past, 
the present, and the future. It is the storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon this 
depository to throw light upon the present; it prepares people to live and make a living 
in the world of today; and it should take the lead in expanding the intellectual horizons 
and the scientific frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward, always toward the 
promise of a better tomorrow." 

From the inaugural address of Dr. Wilson A. Elkins 

President, University of Maryland 

1955-1978 



THE PIONEER OF DENTAL EDUCATION 




This is the official sesquicentennial emblem for 
the first dental school in the world. Like the em- 
blem of dentistry from which it is derived, this 
design uses a serpent entwined about an ancient 
Arabian cautery in the manner of the single ser- 
pent of Aesculapius, the Greek god of medicine. 
The serpent is anchored about the Greek letter 
delta, for dentistry, which is intertwined with a 
circle representing all members of the oral 
health care team. In the foreground is a shield 
bearing the standard of the Maryland state flag. 



Contents 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



FINANCIAL AID 



Philosophy 
The School 
The Campus 
The City 



University Grants 
Endowment and Loan Funds 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 

Application/ Admission 
Academic Policies and Programs 


8 
10 


Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

University of Maryland System 


45 
56 
56 


Requirements for Graduation 
Employment Opportunities in Dentistry 
The Dental Curriculum 
Departments/Programs 


12 
12 
13 
13 


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
POLICY STATEMENTS 


57 
58 


DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS 




MAPS 


61 



General Information 22 
Preprofessional/Professional 

Baccalaureate Program 22 

Two- and Three-Year Professional Curricula 23 

Degree Completion Baccalaureate Program 26 

Master of Science Program 28 

ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Graduate Education 31 

Advanced Dental Education Programs 3 1 

Professional Development 3 1 



STUDENT LIFE 

Student Services 
Student Policies 
Publications/Organizations/Awards 

MATRICULATION POLICIES AND 
PROCEDURES 

Registration Procedures 

Determination of In-State Status 

Tuition and Fees 

Student Expenses 

Official University Records 

Student Health Requirements 




General Information 




PHILOSOPHY 

Since its origin in 1840, the dental profession has 
exhibited a commitment to innovation. With 
continual refinement in clinical procedures and 
an improved understanding of human biology, the 
profession has been able to improve and expand 
its delivery of services. Populations previously un- 
served — the handicapped, medically compro- 
mised, hospitalized — not only are being treated 
but also are benefitting, as is the population at 
large, from improved materials and technology. 

The Dental School's programs focus on the 
three basic aims of the academic community — 
teaching, research and service. As a university dis- 
cipline, dental education must meet and surpass 
its previous accomplishments to ensure the con- 
tinued advancement of dentistry. While the 
process of education must remain anchored firmly 
to time-tested principles, it must also continually 
extend itself to uncover hidden truths within 
these same principles and thereby contribute to 
man's progress toward better understanding and 
control of his environment. 

THE SCHOOL 

History 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore has 
the distinction of being the first dental college in 
the world. Formal education to prepare students 
for the practice of dentistry originated in 1840 
with the establishment of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery. The chartering of the school by 
the General Assembly of Maryland on February 1, 
1840 represented the culmination of the efforts of 
Dr. Horace H. Hayden and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, 
two dental practitioners who recognized the need 
for systematic formal education as the foundation 
for a scientific and serviceable dental profession. 
Together they played a major role in establishing 
and promoting formal dental education, and in 
the development of dentistry as a profession. 

Convinced that support for a formal course in 
dental education would not come from within 
medical schools, Dr. Hayden undertook the estab- 
lishment of an independent dental college. Dr. 
Harris, an energetic and ambitious young man 
who had come to Baltimore in 1830 to study un- 



der Dr. Hayden, joined his mentor in the effort to 
found the college. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
served as a prototype for dental schools gradually 
established in other American cities and origi- 
nated the pattern of modern dental education, 
with equal emphasis on sound knowledge of gen- 
eral medicine and development of the skills of 
dentistry. Through its contributions to dental and 
medical progress and through the prominent role 
of its faculty and graduates in the development of 
the profession, the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery has exerted a remarkable influence on 
professional dentistry. 

The present dental school evolved through a 
series of consolidations involving the Maryland 
Dental College, which merged with the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery in 1878; the Dental 
Department of the University of Maryland, 
founded in 1882; and the Dental Department of 
the Baltimore Medical College, which merged 
with the University of Maryland Dental Depart- 
ment in 1913. The final consolidation took place 
in 1923, when the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery and the University of Maryland Dental 
School were combined to create a distinct depart- 
ment of the university under state supervision and 
control. In 1970 the Dental School moved into 
Hayden-Harris Hall, a new five-story building 
with modern equipment and treatment facilities. 
In 1990 the school's clinical facilities were reno- 
vated to provide a state-of-the-art environment 
for teaching and delivery of care. 



Programs of Study 

The Dental School today strives to offer the finest 
programs of dental education in the world. Con- 
tinuing efforts are made to provide educational 
and training experiences consistent with evolving 
concepts and advances in the delivery of dental 
health care. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program, the school 
offers a baccalaureate program in dental hygiene 
designed to prepare students for careers in dental 
hygiene practice, education, management and re- 
search in private and public settings. Programs 
leading to a graduate degree in basic sciences, oral 
biology and oral pathology are also available, in- 
cluding combined D.D.S./Ph.D. programs. Gradu- 
ate programs are designed to prepare students for 



4 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



careers in academic dentistry or to supplement 
clinical training with knowledge of research 
methods. Research opportunities may be made 
available to dental students as well as to graduate 
and postgraduate students. 

Advanced dental education programs are of- 
fered in the specialty areas of endodontics, oral 
and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, pediatric 
dentistry, periodontics and prosthodontics. Also 
offered are a school-based residency program in 
advanced general dentistry providing advanced 
level training in the practice of comprehensive 
general dentistry, a hospital-based general practice 
residency program through the Dental School and 
the University of Maryland Medical System and 
an advanced general dentistry program for dentists 
serving on faculties of foreign dental schools. 

The Center for Professional Development of- 
fers an integrated curriculum to meet the continu- 
ing education needs of health care professionals. 
Designed to refine diagnostic skills and update 
knowledge in technical and scientific areas, 
courses are conducted annually in special facili- 
ties designed for the professional development 
program. 

In 1983 the Dental School opened the Center 
for the Study of Human Performance in Dentistry, 
a unique educational, research and treatment 
complex which is the only facility of its kind in 
the Western Hemisphere. It provides students and 
faculty diverse opportunities for the study, utiliza- 
tion and evaluation of advanced concepts of 
dental education and care delivery, with a primary 
focus on human performance. Because of its po- 
tential as a model for universal application to the 
training of dental personnel, the World Health 
Organization has designated the Dental School a 
WHO Collaborating Center for the review and 
evaluation of performance simulation training sys- 
tems in oral health care. 

Now in its 150th year, the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore continues to fulfill, 
through its graduates, the aspirations of its 
founders to provide scientifically trained profes- 
sionals to serve the oral health care needs of society. 

Student Body 

Three hundred eighty-five students are enrolled in 
the dental program in the 1992-93 academic year. 



Of these, 42 percent are female; 28 percent are 
minority. The first-year class represents a variety 
of undergraduate institutions across the country. 
Students enrolled average 25 years of age, have a 
mean science grade point average of 2.89 and a 
mean cumulative grade point average of 2.99. The 
faculty presently numbers over 200 persons, in- 
cluding practitioners who teach at the school 
part-time. 



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The National Museum of Dentistry 

In 1989, the dental museum, located on the 
ground floor of Hayden-Harris Hall, was incorpo- 
rated as the National Museum of Dentistry. It is 
fitting that the first museum devoted solely to 
dentistry should be housed in the first dental col- 
lege in the world. Throughout its 150-year his- 
tory, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery ac- 
cumulated a large and valuable collection of 
objects and specimens of historical and profes- 
sional interest. Items currently on display in the 
museum include dental chairs and operatories 
from various periods of dental history, instrument 
cabinets, early instruments, dentures representing 
the various stages through which the art of dental 
prosthesis progressed, the Guerini cabinet con- 
taining replicas of dental appliances from the 
most ancient times through the 18th century, and 
portraits of leaders in the development of profes- 
sional dentistry. The museum is actively collect- 
ing poster art related to dentistry and has built a 
strong collection in this area over the last few 
years. 

The museum is open Monday through Friday 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. except for school holi- 
days. Group tours are welcome, but arrangements 
must be made in advance by calling (410) 706-8314- 



GENERAL INFORMATION'. 5 



Special Lectures 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture . Through 
the generosity of both his family and the school 
alumni, an endowed lectureship was established in 
memory of the late Dr. Grayson W. Gaver, an 
outstanding leader in the field of prosthodontics 
and a distinguished member of the faculty for 
many years. The Gaver Lecture is presented bien- 
nially as part of Student-Faculty Day activities. 

The Stephen E. and Jeffrey A. Kleiman Lectures 
in Dentistry and Medicine. As a tribute to the selec- 
tion of careers in the health professions by his 
sons, Dr. Bernard S. Kleiman established this an- 
nual lecture program to alternate between the 
University of Maryland Dental School and the 
School of Medicine. Distinguished individuals are 
invited to lecture on topics pertinent and applica- 
ble to practicing dentists or physicians. The 
Kleiman Lecture alternates with the Gaver 
Lecture as part of Student-Faculty Day activities. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell Lecture. 
In 1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. William B. and 
Elizabeth S. Powell, presented the school with a 
generous contribution for the purpose of institut- 
ing special lectures for the benefit of the student 
body and faculty. The first lecture in the series 
was presented in April 1966. Recently this lec- 
tureship was endowed by the Powells as a means 
of continuing to enrich the total academic program. 

The Jane Boswell Toomey and Lewis Cole 
Toomey, D.D.S. Memorial Lecture. Endowed in 
1982 by a major gift from the Toomey family, to- 
gether with contributions by friends and associates 
of Dr. and Mrs. Toomey, this biennial lecture was 
initiated during the 1985-86 academic year. The 
Toomey Lecture provides a forum for distin- 
guished individuals to speak on timely dental re- 
search and clinical topics useful to dental profes- 
sionals in practice and teaching. The lectures are 
open to all members of the dental community. 

In addition to these annual lectures, there are 
three special lectures which are presented on a ro- 
tating basis once every three years as part of the 
Commencement/Alumni Week activities: The 
John E. Fogarty Memorial Lecture, sponsored by 
the Rhode Island Section of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery Alumni Association; The 
Hayden-Harris Memorial Lecture, sponsored by 
the Alumni Association; and The J. Ben Robin- 
son Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Maryland 
Section of the American College of Dentists. 



THE CAMPUS 

The Dental School is an integral part of this cam- 
pus for the professions. Located on 32 acres in 
downtown Baltimore, the campus began in 1807 
with the founding of the School of Medicine. In 
1840 it was joined by the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery and today these two schools share 
the campus with the Schools of Law, Nursing, 
Pharmacy, Social Work; an interprofessional 
Graduate School; and the University of Maryland 
Medical System. Some 5,000 students attend the 
seven schools and three allied health programs on 
this campus, which is one of the first centers for 
professional education in the country. 




The university educates a majority of the re- 
gion's health care, legal and social service practi- 
tioners. Admission is very competitive, with more 
than five applicants for each first-year place. 

New partnerships among university com- 
ponents and with the University of Maryland 
Medical Center and new Veterans Affairs Medi- 
cal Center are strengthening interdisciplinary 
endeavors in both research and teaching. The 
location, within the Baltimore-Washington- 
Annapolis triangle, maximizes opportunities for 
collaboration with government agencies, health 
care institutions and life sciences industries. 

The Health Sciences Library 

The Health Sciences Library serves all compo- 
nents on the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
campus. It is the regional medical library for 10 
southeastern states, the District of Columbia, the 
Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, as part of the bio- 



6. DENTAL SCHOOL 



medical information network of the National Li- 
brary of Medicine. The library has over 300,000 
volumes, including 2,900 current journal titles, 
and is ranked in size among the top 25 health sci- 
ences libraries in the United States. 

A unit of Information Services at UMAB, the 
library has one of the most advanced automated 
library systems in the country. Circulation ser- 
vices are completely automated as is the catalog 
that provides access to library holdings. The li- 
brary's online catalog allows users to look for ma- 
terials by title, author, subject, key word, call 
number, series, meeting name and organization 
name. In addition to giving information on library 
holdings, the system can determine whether the 
material has been checked out of the library. The 
online catalog can be accessed from any computer 
terminal on the UMAB campus that is linked to 
the campus network, as well as from any dial ac- 
cess terminal. 

The library also provides access to a wide range 
of automated databases of the journal literature 
through its computerized reference and biblio- 
graphic services (CRABS). MaryMED and HSL 
Current Contents®, self-service databases, also are 
available for persons who prefer to perform their 
own literature searches. Both can be accessed 
from across the UMAB campus, from home or by 
visiting the library. A number of other self-service 
database searching options also are available. 

Computer Resources 

Microcomputer support for faculty, staff and stu- 
dents, as well as mainframe research and instruc- 
tional computing on the IBM 4341 are provided 
through Health Informatics and Computer User 
Services, both units of Information Services at 
UMAB. Computers in several conveniently 
located Technology Assisted Learning (TAL) 
Centers are available for use by the campus com- 
munity and for training in applications packages. 

Programming languages such as FORTRAN, 
BASIC and PL/1, as well as statistical analysis 
packages like SAS, SPSS-X and BMDP are avail- 
able for the mainframe computer. Free worldwide 
electronic mail accounts, via the Professional Of- 
fice System (PROFS), enable faculty, staff and 
students to exchange notes, files and documents 
with others both at UMAB and internationally 



via Bitnet, which links 1,800 computers at more 
than 500 academic institutions. 

Instructional courses and training classes are 
available in Wordperfect, Lotus, dBase and graph- 
ics, among others. Students, faculty and re- 
searchers are able to use Information Services re- 
sources at every step of their work, from collection 
of information through preparation for final pre- 
sentation, including desktop publishing, color 
printing and plotting, overheads and color slides. 

The IBM 4341 system is accessible from the 
user area from terminals throughout the campus 
and by dial-up modem from either office or home. 
Staff consultants can help with first aid, program 
debugging and applications support. 

THE CITY 

In addition to professional opportunities, the city 
of Baltimore, 13th largest in the nation, offers a 
stimulating environment in which to live and 
study. Having been the location of many signifi- 
cant events in the nation's history, including the 
writing of the national anthem, the city maintains 
a strong feeling for the past as typified by the 
many charming neighborhoods of restored houses 
and abundance of historic buildings. Baltimore 
combines the sophistication of a large metropoli- 
tan city with easy accessibility to surrounding 
mountains, beaches and rural areas. 

Several blocks from campus is the nationally 
acclaimed Inner Harbor area, where Harborplace, 
the National Aquarium, the Maryland Science 
Center and office buildings share an attractive 
waterfront with sailboats, hotels, restaurants and 
renovated townhouses. Connecting the down- 
town area to the outskirts of the city is the Balti- 
more Metro subway system, the first leg of an an- 
ticipated citywide subway system, and a recently 
completed light rail system. 

As a cultural center, Baltimore has offerings to 
please the most discriminating, including a world- 
class symphony orchestra, many fine museums, li- 
braries and professional theater groups. For sports 
fans, Baltimore features a new baseball stadium 
within walking distance of the campus, as well as 
Spirit soccer, collegiate and club lacrosse and the 
nationally acclaimed Preakness. Nearby, the 
Chesapeake Bay offers unparalleled water sports 
and the seafood for which the region is famous. 




GENERAL 1 N F O R M A T 1 O N • 7 



The Dental Program 



APPLICATION/ADMISSION 

Equal Opportunity 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore is an 
equal opportunity institution with respect to both 
education and employment. The university's poli- 
cies, programs and activities are in conformance 
with pertinent federal and state laws and regula- 
tions on nondiscrimination regarding race, color, 
religion, age, national origin, sex and handicap. 

The Dental School has the objective of secur- 
ing a broad racial, sexual and ethnic balance in 
its enrollment. To achieve this objective it gives 
every consideration to minority student applications. 

Requirements for Admission to the Dental 
Program 

The Dental School has established admission cri- 
teria which permit flexibility in the choice of an 
undergraduate program while remaining discrimi- 
native with regard to scholastic achievement. Stu- 
dents who are majoring in either science or non- 
science disciplines are encouraged to apply. In 
addition, those individuals who are interested in 
changing their careers will be seriously considered 
in the admissions process, the goal of which is to 
identify applicants who possess the ability to 
think critically and who have demonstrated inde- 
pendence and self-direction. 

Applicants to the dental program must success- 
fully complete at least three academic years (90 
credit hours) in an accredited university. The un- 
dergraduate curriculum must include, at a mini- 
mum, eight semester hours each of general biology 
and inorganic chemistry, including laboratories. 
Persons who seek admission under the minimum 
requirements are expected to achieve superior 
grades in prerequisite courses, for these courses 
best predict performance in the biological sciences 
of the dental curriculum. 

Non-science as well as science majors are en- 
couraged to apply. Applicants should be able to 
show evidence that they have undertaken a chal- 
lenging program in their respective disciplines, 
supplemented by a broad selection of courses in 
the social sciences, humanities and arts. Experi- 
ence in the development of fine manual dexterity 
is strongly recommended. Applicants are expected 
to have knowledge of the nature of the profession 
acquired through observation of dental practice 



and by reading appropriate literature. The Office 
of Admissions reserves the right to modify the 
prerequisites when additional courses are neces- 
sary to improve an applicant's preparation for 
dental school. 

No more than 60 of the minimum required 
credits will be accepted from a junior college; 
these credits must have been validated by an ac- 
credited college of arts and sciences. All admis- 
sion requirements must be completed by June 30 
prior to the desired date of admission. Applicants 
must also present favorable recommendations 
from their respective predental committee or, if 
no such committee is available, from one instruc- 
tor each in the departments of biology and chem- 
istry. In all other respects, applicants must give 
every promise of becoming successful students and 
dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be 
admitted with unabsolved conditions or unab- 
solved failures. 




The admission decision will be based upon per- 
formance in previous academic programs, the 
quality of those programs, and personal factors, as 
evidenced by letters of recommendation, extracur- 
ricular activities and a personal interview. Mary- 
land residents should have science and cumulative 
grade point average (GPA) values of 2.5 or higher 
to be competitive for admission; nonresidents 
should have GPA values of 2.8 or higher. All ap- 
plicants are encouraged to take the Dental Ad- 
missions Test (DAT) no later than October of the 
year prior to admission. 

A pamphlet describing the test and an applica- 
tion to take the test will be sent to the applicant 
upon request to the Office of Admissions and Re- 
cruitment of the Dental School. The pamphlet 



DENTAL SCHOOL 



lists the dates of the tests (given in April and Oc- 
tober) and the location of testing centers through- 
out the United States, its possessions and Canada. 
Candidates should have scores of 15 or higher in 
the Academic Average and the Perceptual Ability 
sections in order to be competitive. The DAT will 
be used as an adjunct to the applicant's educa- 
tional credentials rather than as an independent 
determinant of admissibility. However, the lower 
the applicant's science GPA, the more important 
are the results of the DAT. 

Residency 

Information on the regulations for the determina- 
tion of resident status may be obtained from the 
Office of Records and Registration, 621 West 
Lombard Street, Room 326, University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Application and Acceptance Procedures 

Students are admitted only at the beginning of 
the fall semester in August. All applications are 
processed through the American Association of 
Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS). 
An AADSAS application request card is available 
to applicants after May 1 of the year prior to the 
desired date of admission upon request to the Of- 
fice of Admissions and Recruitment of the Dental 
School. The AADSAS application must be filed 
by all applicants prior to March 1; early filing of the 
application is strongly recommended. AADSAS will 
duplicate the transcript, calculate the grade point 
average of each applicant, and furnish pertinent 
information to the Dental School. 

If the requirements for admission are fulfilled, 
the applicant will receive the Dental School's 
application form, which should be completed and 
mailed with the application fee to the Office of 
Admissions and Recruitment of the Dental 
School. If receipt of the application and applica- 
tion fee is not acknowledged within 10 days, the 
applicant should contact the admissions office. 
All applicants who are seriously being considered 
will be interviewed; a personal interview does not, 
however, guarantee admission. The Subcommit- 
tee on Dental Student Admissions, composed of 
members of the faculty, students and alumni, se- 
lects qualified applicants for admission based on 
the applicant's grade point average, DAT scores, 
personal recommendations and the personal inter- 



view. A deposit of $200 must accompany an ap- 
plicant's acceptance of an offer of admission. It 
will be credited toward the applicant's tuition and 
is non-refundable. An additional $100 deposit is 
due by June 1 to confirm intent to enroll. Admis- 
sion is contingent upon continued satisfactory 
academic performance and behavior during the 
period between acceptance and enrollment. Ad- 
mission requirements are subject to change with- 
out prior notice. 



Admission with Advanced Standing 

Students currently attending dental schools in the 
United States and graduates of dental schools in 
other countries may apply for admission with ad- 
vanced standing. It should be noted, however, 
that such admissions occur infrequently because of 
limited space availability or incompatibility of 
curricula at different schools. Students admitted 
with advanced standing may be exempted from 
certain courses by passing a competency examina- 
tion. Any person interested in admission with ad- 
vanced standing should contact the Office of Ad- 
missions and Recruitment in the Dental School 
for specific information about requirements and to 
request application forms. 

UMES-UMAB Honors Program 

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore 
(UMES), in cooperation with the professional 
schools of the University of Maryland at Balti- 
more (UMAB), instituted an Honors Program in 
an effort to prepare students for professional 
school study while providing them with a sound 
liberal arts education at the same time. The Hon- 
ors Program consists of honors sections in chem- 




THE DENTAL PROGRAMS 



istry, biology, mathematics, English and social 
science. It also emphasizes independent study, 
seminars and colloquia through which students 
are expected to explore in depth the various disci- 
plines. Specific preprofessional tracks in allied 
health, dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, phar- 
macy and social work are available. Upon success- 
ful completion of all requirements of the Honors 
Program, which include the professional school 
admission requirements, the Honors Program 
graduate will be admitted into the corresponding 
professional school on the UMAB campus during 
the year immediately following graduation from 
UMES. 

Admission into the Honors Program is deter- 
mined by the Honors Program Committee which 
is composed of representatives from UMES and 
each professional school at UMAB. A combina- 
tion of predictive factors, such as SAT scores, in- 
terviews, letters of recommendation and a per- 
sonal statement written at the time of the 
interview will be used to determine the eligibility 
of a student for admission into the Honors Pro- 
gram. The cumulative academic performance of 
an applicant, as indicated by the high school 
record, will be assessed. For additional informa- 
tion, write to the Honors Committee, University 
of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Mary- 
land 21853. 

Combined Arts and Sciences/Dental Program 

Although the Dental School supports a coherent 
four-year program of undergraduate education for 
most students, it recognizes that some individuals 
may be prepared to enter after three years. The 
University of Maryland College Park, University 
of Maryland Baltimore County, Bowie State Col- 
lege, Coppin State College, Morgan State Univer- 
sity and Salisbury State College offer a combined 
curriculum leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The pre- 
professional part of this curriculum is taken in res- 
idence in the college of arts and sciences on any 
of the six campuses, and the professional part at 
the Dental School in Baltimore. Students who 
have been approved for the combined program 
and who have completed the arts and sciences 
phase may, upon the recommendation of the dean 
of the Dental School, be granted the degree of 
Bachelor of Science by the undergraduate college 



10. DENTAL SCHOOL 



following the completion of the student's first year 
in the Dental School. Further information and ap- 
plications may be obtained from the office of ad- 
missions at the respective undergraduate college. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 

In the evaluation of student performance, the fol- 
lowing letter grades are used: 

A - excellent 

B - good 

C - satisfactory 

D - below average 

E - conditional 

F - failure 

I - incomplete 

A failure must be absolved by repeating the en- 
tire course, in which case the original F grade re- 
mains on the student's permanent record, but only 
the new grade is used to compute the grade point 
average. 

A student whose performance is not satisfac- 
tory in one or more segments of a course or in 
some clinical procedures may receive an E grade. 
This grade indicates that the student has failed to 
master a limited segment of a course but should 
achieve a satisfactory level of proficiency within a 
short time. When the E grade is used as a tempo- 
rary final grade it remains on the student record. 
Following successful remediation, the student will 
receive the final grade earned in the course. An 
unresolved grade of E will result in a permanent 
grade of F. 

Students whose work in completed assignments 
is of acceptable quality but who, because of cir- 
cumstances beyond their control (such as illness 
or disability), have been unable to complete 
course requirements will receive a grade of Incom- 
plete. When all requirements have been satisfied, 
students will receive the final grade earned in the 
course. Except under extraordinary circumstances, 
an Incomplete may not be carried into the next 
academic year. 

Since performance at the D level is unaccept- 
able in the clinical sciences, the D grade is not 
used by the clinical departments. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis 
of credits assigned to each course and the follow- 
ing numerical values for grades: A-4, B-3, C-2, 






D-l, F-0. The grade point average is the sum of 
the products of course credits and grade values, di- 
vided by the total number o{ course credits in that 
year of the curriculum.The performance of each 
student is reviewed at the end of each semester by 
the appropriate advancement committee. The 
committee determines, on the basis of progress 
and/or final grades, whether the student is pro- 
gressing satisfactorily or if remediation or assign- 
ment to a special program (first- or second-year 
students only) is warranted. 

Students assigned to a special program are 
placed under the supervision of the Special Aca- 
demic Programs Committee, which tailors a pro- 
gram to the needs and abilities of each student 
and reviews progress, recommends remediation, 
determines advancement or recommends dismissal 
on the basis of progress and/or final grades at the 
end of each semester. 

All first- and second-year students must have 
completed satisfactorily the first two years of the 
curriculum before advancement into the regular 
third-year curriculum is approved. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point aver- 
age and passing grades in all courses in order to 
advance unconditionally to the next year. Condi- 
tional advancement may be assigned to third-year 
students who have not successfully completed all 
courses but who, in the judgment of the advance- 
ment committee, should be afforded the opportu- 
nity to complete third-year requirements while 
proceeding with fourth-year courses. Probationary 
advancement may be assigned to students in the 
following categories: 

1. First- and second-year students who obtain a 
grade point average of 1.70-1.99 and have pass- 
ing grades in all courses. 

2. Third-year students who obtain a grade point 
average of 1.85-1.99 in third-year courses and 
passing grades in all courses. 

A student placed on probationary status must 
achieve a minimum 2.0 average and pass all 
courses taken during the probationary academic 
year. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from 
the dental program subject to discretionary review 
by the Faculty Council. 

A student may be permitted to absolve defi- 
ciencies during the summer session, as recom- 
mended by the appropriate advancement commit- 
tee. Depending on the type of deficiencies 



involved, students may be required to register and 
pay a fee for the summer session. Students with 
deficiencies too severe to be absolved during the 
summer session may be afforded the opportunity 
to repeat or remediate a specific year of the dental 
program. Remediation of the year provides stu- 
dents who would otherwise have to repeat the 
year's work in its entirety with the opportunity for 
exemption from courses or portions of courses at 
the discretion of the department chairman. Stu- 
dents who are repeating or remediating any year 
of the dental program are placed on probation. 

If it is determined that a student is progressing 
so poorly that remediation will not bring him/ 
her to a passing level, dismissal will be recom- 
mended to the Faculty Council. 

The appropriate advancement committee de- 
termines for each student either unconditional ad- 
vancement, conditional or probationary advance- 
ment, repeat or remediation of the year, or 
recommends academic dismissal to the Faculty 
Council, which approves all decisions pertaining 
to dismissal or graduation. A student may appeal 
any action of an advancement committee or the 
Faculty Council by submission of a written request 
to the dean. 




Specially Tailored Educational Program 

The Specially Tailored Educational Program 
(STEP) functions within the framework of the 
regular curriculum but allows students to spend up 
to three years completing first- and second-year 
courses. The program was developed for students 
who, because of academic difficulty, illness or 
other circumstances, need special assistance 
and/or additional time to fulfill the academic re- 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM. 11 




quirements. It also accommodates the specific 
program needs of students transferring from other 
institutions. 

The First and Second Year Advancement 
Committees may offer a student the option of 
STEP or assign to STEP any student whose 
progress is unsatisfactory if it is generally agreed 
that a reduced load and/or special tutorial assis- 
tance may improve the student's chance of suc- 
cessfully completing course requirements. Stu- 
dents assigned to STEP are placed under the 
supervision of the Special Academic Programs 
Committee, which plans an individualized pro- 
gram for each student and carefully monitors 
progress. Departmental counselors in the basic sci- 
ences and preclinical sciences are available to as- 
sist any student assigned to STEP. 

Students may be advanced into the regular pro- 
gram when they have demonstrated satisfactory 
progress; otherwise they remain in STEP until 
they have completed all first- and second-year 
courses. Once the student is advanced into the 
regular program, academic progress is evaluated by 
the appropriate advancement committee. 

Attendance Policy 

The faculty and administration of the Dental 
School expect every student to attend all sched- 
uled lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and 
clinic assignments, except in the event of illness 
or emergency. Excused absences must be reported 
to the dean's office so that departments may be 
advised to offer assistance upon the student's return. 

The Minimester 

In the January minimester, students in all years of 
the dental program may choose to take elective 
courses when required courses are not scheduled. 
The clinic continues to operate on the usual 
schedule during the minimester. Any credit 
awarded for minimester elective courses will not 
be applied to the D.D.S. degree. 

Undergraduate students contemplating a career 
in dentistry may attend this session on a per 
course basis. Information concerning course offer- 
ings is distributed to prospective students by the 
Office of Admissions and Recruitment and to all 
enrolled students by the Office of Academic and 
Student Affairs. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred 
upon a candidate who has met the conditions 
specified below: 

1. A candidate must have satisfied all require- 
ments of the various departments. 

2. A candidate must pass all fourth-year courses 
and achieve a minimum 2.0 average in the 
fourth year. 

3. The candidate must have paid all debts to the 
university prior to graduation. 

Qraduation Dates 

Students who enter the D.D.S. program at the 
University of Maryland Dental School are re- 
quired to complete a minimum of four academic 
years at the school. The length of the program has 
been established in order to provide for the stu- 
dents a comprehensive professional education. 
Graduation for students who complete the pro- 
gram within this prescribed period is in May. Stu- 
dents who fail to complete all requirements in 
May may be considered for graduation the follow- 
ing July, January or May, as they are judged ready 
to do so. 



EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN 
DENTISTRY 

The public demand for more and better oral 
health care will continue to create a climate for 
growth in the dental profession. The average in- 
come of dentists between the ages of 25 to 29 is 
$44,480 per annum, or 1.6 times more than the 
average income of college graduates in the same 
age group. Income levels are always contingent 
upon and affected by the area served, the practice 
specialty, and the state of the economy at the 
time. 



12 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



THE DENTAL CURRICULUM 



YEAR I 



YEAR III 



SUBJECT 




CREDIT 








Semester 

1 2 


Total 


Anatomy 




13 




13 


Biochemistry 




5 




5 


Conjoint Sciences I 






3 


3 


Dental Biomatenals I 




1 


1 


2 


Microbiology- 






5 


5 


Physio logy- 






5 


5 


Oral and Maxillofacic 


1 Surgery 




1 


1 


Dental Anatomy/Occ 


lusion 


4 




4 


Operative Dentistry 






5 


5 


Oral Health Care Delivery 


1 


2 


3 


Periodontics 




1 


1 


2 



25 23 



48 



SUBJECT 


CREDIT 






Semester 
I 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences III 


2 


2 


4 


Endodontics 


2 


2 


4 


Fixed Prosthodontics 


3 


3 


6 


Operative Dentistry- 


3 


4 


7 


Oral Health Care Delivery 
or 

Special Studies (elective) 


3 


3 


6 
(6) 


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery- 


2 


1 


3 


Oral Medicine & 
Diagnostic Sciences 


4 


3 


7 


Orthodontics 


1 


1 


9 


Pediatric Dentistry 


4 


4 


s 


Periodontics 


6 


5 


11 


Removable Prosthodontics 


4 


4 


8 



34 32 



66 



YEAR II 



SUBJECT 


CREDIT 






Semester 

I 2 


Total 


Biomedicine 


5 


7 


\j 


Conjoint Sciences II 


6 


6 


12 


Dental Biomaterials II 11 


Oral Health Care Deliverv 


1 


: 




Pediatric Dentistry 1 1 


Pharmacology- 


5 






Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 




l 




Endodontics 




l 




Fixed Prosthodontics 


3 


3 




Orthodontics 1 1 


Periodontics 


1 


1 


2 


Removable Prosthodontics 


3 


3 


6 



24 l\ 



51 



YEAR IV 



SUBJECT 


CREDIT 






Semester 

1 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences IV 


3 3 


6 


Clinic 


29 31 


60 



32 34 66 
Curriculum requirements are subject to change 
without prior notice. 

DEPARTMENTS/PROGRAMS 

ANATOMY 

Chairman: Louis A. Benevento 

Professor: Benevento 

Associate Professors: Gartner, Hiatt, Meszler, 

Olson, Seibel 

Instructor: Castillo 

Adjunct Faculty: Hollmger, Rekow, Sestokas 

Associate Staff: Groves, McCleary 

The basic course in human anatomy is devoted 
to the study of the cells, tissues, organs and organ 
systems of the body using an interdiscipli- 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM. 13 



nary approach encompassing gross anatomy, 
neuroanatomy, histology and developmental 
anatomy. Principles of body structure and func- 
tion are studied with a particular emphasis on the 
head and neck and major organ systems. A strong 
effort is made to correlate the anatomy curriculum 
with other courses in the basic and clinical sci- 
ences of the dental curriculum. The department 
conducts research and graduate training in neuro- 
physiology, neuroanatomy, craniofacial develop- 
ment and teratology, and gingival overgrowth in 
relation to drug therapy. 
DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Chairman: Charles B. Leonard, Jr. 
Professors: Chang, Leonard, Thut 
Associate Professors: Bashirelahi, Callery 
Assistant Professor: Courtade 
Research Professor: Varma 

Biochemistry, as emphasized in this department, is 
a study of cellular processes at the molecular level 
and the influences of nutrition and pathologies on 
these processes. The department has two teaching 
goals: to present a comprehensive course in bio- 
chemistry to the first-year students seeking a pro- 
fessional degree in dentistry, and to provide a pro- 
gram of specialized training for graduate students 
seeking an advanced graduate degree (M.S., 
Ph.D.) in preparation for a career in teaching 
and/or research. 

The course provided for dental students covers 
the major traditional subjects of biochemistry. 
Dental students who have previously taken a 
course in biochemistry may take a competency ex- 
amination which, if passed satisfactorily, permits 
them to be excused from taking this course. 

The department participates in the Conjoint 
Sciences program and is currently involved in re- 
search projects concerned with the following sub- 
jects: isolation, characterization and immuno- 
genicity of bacterial cell wall antigens and 
membrane glycolipids; brain metabolism of amino 
acids and the neurological significance of their 
metabolites as potential neurotransmitters and/or 
modulators for neurotransmission; induction and 
regulation of enzymes in amino acid catabolic 
pathways; study of the effects of environmental 
pollutant peroxisome proliferators on the central 
nervous system via the GABAergic system as well 



as on tooth development via peroxisomes local- 
ized in odontoblasts; action of steroid hormones 
on soluble intracellular cytoplasmic or nuclei re- 
ceptors; characterization of the structure/function 
of various steroid hormone receptors by chemi- 
cally modifying sulfhydryl, amino, hydroxyl and 
tyrosyl groups; and study of osteocalcin, a noncol- 
lagenous calcium binding protein found in the or- 
ganic matrix of bone dentin and other mineralized 
tissues. 
DBIC 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 




CLERKSHIP PROQRAM 

Two elective clerkship programs allow selected 
fourth-year students to pursue further studies in 
departmental activities specially designed to meet 
their needs and interests. Students devote a por- 
tion of their clinic time to these specialized pro- 
grams; the remaining clinic time is spent in the 
comprehensive treatment of patients in the regu- 
lar program. Clerkships are available in basic sci- 
ence and clinical disciplines and several incorpo- 
rate off-campus clinical experiences in various 
practice settings. 

DCJS 558. Clerkship 1 (elective ) (20) 
DCJS 559. Clerkship II (elective) (10) 

CLINICAL DENTISTRY 

Staff: All clinical departments 

The clinical education program is designed to pro- 
vide each student with a broad background of 
clinical experience based on the philosophy 
of prevention and comprehensive patient care. 
Although the need for the treatment of existing 
disease is of paramount importance, the clinical 
program stresses long-term complete dental care 



14 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



founded on preventing the occurrence or recur- 
rence of disease. Each student provides patient 
care in a General Practice in a manner similar to 
practitioners in the community. Clinical areas for 
predoctoral instruction are designated primarily 
for general practice teams. Clinical instruction is 
accomplished using dentist-managers, general 
dentists and specialists providing interdepartmen- 
tal instruction for the student and the highest 
level of dental care for the patient. The clinical 
program functions year round in order to provide 
continuity of patient care. 

CLINICAL SIMULATION 

Director: George F. Buchness 
Staff: All departments 

The Clinical Simulation Program is a four-year 
comprehensive program with the purpose of simu- 
lating the delivery of oral health care. It includes 
three components all of which are of equal impor- 
tance. The first provides the student with an 
awareness of the optimum utilization of the body 
in the performance of procedures. The second 
component provides the student with the oppor- 
tunity to apply the concepts of performance logic 
in the clinical simulation unit. The third compo- 
nent provides for the application of skills in the 
delivery of patient care in the clinic. Working 
in instructional settings that replicate the clinical 
setting, the dental student learns to deliver high 
quality care utilizing a process that includes attention 
to appropriate control of the operating environment. 

CONJOINT SCIENCES 
Director: Harold L. Crossley 
Staff: All departments 

Conjoint Sciences is the administrative unit re- 
sponsible for the coordination of subjects which 
are most appropriately presented in an interdisci- 
plinary format. In the first year, lectures in Con- 
joint Sciences introduce the students to the his- 
tory of dentistry, the epidemiology of chemical 
dependency and geriatric dentistry. 

Human growth and development, immunol- 
ogy, diagnosis and treatment of pulp and periapi- 
cal disease, cariology, ethics, clinical aspects of 
head and neck anatomy, geriatric dentistry and 
dental anesthesiology are subjects presented in the 
second year of Conjoint Sciences. Certification 



for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and 
blood pressure measurement also are required 
components of this program. 

The third year of Conjoint Sciences deals pri- 
marily with the management of clinical problems 
associated with the interdisciplinary topics previ- 
ously presented. Topics include dental manage- 
ment of the patient with special needs, therapeu- 
tics, general anesthesia, ethical dilemmas and 
geriatric dentistry. 

The curriculum in the fourth year includes an 
exploration of dental practice options and deci- 
sions, temporomandibular dysfunctions and a se- 
ries of lectures on medical emergencies in the 
dental office. A wide range of elective courses is 
also offered in the fourth year Conjoint Sciences 
curriculum. 

DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences I (3) 
DCJS 528. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 
DCJS 538. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 
DCJS 548. Conjoint Sciences IV (6) 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY 

Chairman/Chief of Service: George H. Williams III 
Professor: Bergquist 
Associate Professor: Williams 
Assistant Professors: Crooks, McDonald 
Clinical Assistant Professor: Vandermer 

The Department of Dentistry is a department of 
the Dental School and the University of Mary- 
land Medical System. It is within this department 
that the General Practice Residency and Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery programs function. The 
Dental School provides faculty from its five basic 
sciences and 12 clinical science departments to 
support the didactic and clinical components of 
the residency programs. 

EDUCATIONAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL 
RESOURCES 

Chairman: James F. Craig 

Professors: Craig, Moreland, Romberg 

Research Professor: Ball 

Dental School Assistant Professor: Zimmerman 

Clinical Instructor: Robinson 

Associate Staff: Land 

The Department of Educational and Instructional 
Resources has as its primary objective the imple- 
mentation of a comprehensive instructional de- 




THE DENTAL PROGRAM. 15 




velopment program embracing all areas of the 
dental curriculum. Such a program applies the 
principles of management to the process of educa- 
tion and is designed to maintain a constant focus 
on the quality of the education being provided 
students pursuing a career in dentistry or dental 
hygiene. A fully equipped Independent Learning 
Center housing study carrels and a wide variety of 
audiovisual equipment used in conjunction with 
assigned curricular materials is also available. 
Consultation on the development of instructional 
packages, media applications, research design, sta- 
tistics, test construction and evaluation tech- 
niques and procedures is provided through the de- 
partment's faculty and staff. 

The department's Division of Dental Informat- 
ics offers guidance and direction in the applica- 
tion of computers and optical disc technology in 
dental and dental hygiene education. It is also re- 
sponsible for maintaining and supporting the 
school's computerized dental clinic management 
system. It is in this department that one of the 
campus' Technology Assisted Learning (TAL) 
Centers is housed. 

The Independent Learning Center is open 
more than 65 hours a week including evenings 
and Saturdays and provides a comfortable atmos- 
phere for independent study. Students, faculty and 
practitioners are welcome to use these facilities at 
any time. 

ENDODONTICS 

Chairman: Eric J. Hovland 
Professor: Hovland 
Associate Professor: Dumsha 
Clinical Associate Professors: Kelly, Schunick 
Assistant Professors: McDonald, Rauschen- 
berger 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Gamson, Hyson, 
Jones, Koch, Quarantillo, Trattner, Waxman 
Clinical Instructors: Arita, Bailey, Bowersox, El- 
lis, Lipps, Mocknick, Niehaus, Way 

The student's introduction to endodontics begins 
in the second year. It consists of a series of lec- 
tures, seminars, laboratories and patient simula- 
tions that stress both the fundamentals and bio- 
logic principles of endodontics. 

In the third year, lectures are presented which 
expand upon the basic material presented in the 
second year. Cases are treated clinically with the 



student demonstrating an acceptable level of com- 
petency by the completion of the third year. The 
fourth-year experience in endodontics is primarily 
clinical. Competency in clinical endodontics with 
more complex cases is expected of each student. 
A clerkship program in advanced endodontics is 
available to selected students in their fourth year. 

The department conducts research in dental 
traumatology, dental materials, endodontic 
surgery and immunology. 

ENDO 522. Principles of Pre-Clinical En- 
dodontics ( 1 ) 

ENDO 538. Principles of Clinical Endodontics 
(4) 
ENDO 548. Endodontic Clinic (4) 

MICROBIOLOQY 

Chairman: William A. Falkler, Jr. 

Professors: Falkler, Hawley, Krywolap, Minah 

Associate Professors: Delisle, Nauman, Sydiskis, 

Williams 

Associate Staff: Kaur, Kelly, Organ 

The Department of Microbiology offers predoc- 
toral and graduate programs. The predoctoral pro- 
gram is organized to supply students with the fun- 
damental principles of microbiology in order that 
they may understand the chemical and biological 
mechanisms of the production of disease by bacte- 
ria and other parasites, and the means by which 
the host protects itself against bacteria and related 
organisms. The graduate programs leading toward 
the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy are designed to train students for posi- 
tions in research and teaching, particularly in 
dental schools. Research is currently being con- 
ducted in oral microbiology (caries and periodon- 
tal diseases), pathogenic microbiology, immunol- 
ogy, virology, microbial genetics, microbial ecology, 
cytology and microbial physiology. 
DMIC 512. Microbiology (5) 

ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY 
Chairman: Leonard A. Cohen 
Professors: L. A. Cohen, Morganstein 
Clinical Professors: Greeley, Mecklenburg 
Associate Professors: Belenky, Blank, Manski 
Dental School Associate Professors: Ailor, Gin- 
gell, Jones, M. Rekow, Swanson, G. Williams 
Clinical Associate Professors: Beach, Bowman, 
Caplan, Christopher, Dana, Geboy, Shulman 



16. DENTAL SCHOOL 



Assistant Professors: Barnes, Colangelo, Grace, 

Yellowitz 

Dental School Assistant Professors: Bauman, 

Creamer, Eldridge, W. Tewes, M. Wilson 

Clinical Assistant Professors: DiNardo, Fedele, 

Goodman, Hyson, Imm, Levinson, Liggett, Perell, 

Schlank, Schmidt, R. Siegel, Streckfus, Trail, 

Ward 

Instructor: George 

Clinical Instructors: Allen, Bullock, Caputo, 

L. Cohen, S. Cohen, Garelick, Criado-Hedreen, 

Irwin, Shires, Sim, G. Wood, Yakoumatos 

Associate Staff: Copelan 

In its teaching, research and service activities, the 
Department of Oral Health Care Delivery contin- 
ually develops, evaluates and disseminates infor- 
mation and methods to meet the needs of the 
providers and recipients of oral health care. 

The major areas of teaching responsibility are: 
(1) behavioral sciences, (2) dental practice ad- 
ministration, (3) dental delivery systems, (4) epi- 
demiology and scientific literature evaluation, 
(5) geriatric dentistry, (6) special patient care, 
(7) community outreach, and (8) the clinical 
practice of dentistry utilizing human performance 
logic and appropriate auxiliary personnel. During 
the four-year curriculum, students attend depart- 
ment sponsored lectures, seminars, independent 
and small group projects, community rotations 
and patient care clinics. 

The core curriculum includes the following 
topics: first year — oral health care issues, princi- 
ples of epidemiology and review of scientific liter- 
ature; second year — applied behavioral analysis, 
communication, patient compliance, stress man- 
agement, and dental health education; third 
year — computer applications, accounting, finance, 
economics, law, marketing, taxes, practice and 
business planning, and dental practice systems 
clinic; fourth year — dental practice administra- 
tion, and dental practice systems clinic. Lectures 
on geriatric dentistry occur in all four years of the 
curriculum in the Conjoint Sciences program. 
The third- and fourth-year dental practice systems 
clinic program demonstrates delivery system alter- 
natives using human performance, behavioral and 
modern practice administration concepts. The de- 
partment supports the dental school's comprehen- 
sive care program through the clinical and man- 
agerial support it provides the General. Practices. 



Additionally, students participate in a variety of 
volunteer and required community experiences 
during each year of the dental school program. 

In addition, lectures on the nature of handi- 
capping and medically compromising conditions 
and their effects on the patient are presented in 
the first three years of the curriculum. During the 
third and fourth year of this special patient pro- 
gram, students are the primary providers for physi- 
cally disabled and mentally handicapped individu- 
als and those with special medical conditions or 
infectious diseases. All clinical care is provided in 
special facilities designed and operated for the de- 
livery of dental care to handicapped and med- 
ically compromised individuals of all ages. 

The department conducts research in dental 
materials, clinical trials, practice administration, 
behavioral sciences, geriatric dentistry and dental 
delivery systems. 

OHCD 518. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 528. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 538. Oral Health Care Delivery (6) 
OHCD 548. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 




ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURQERY 

Chairman: Gerald W. Gaston 
Professors: Bergman, DeVore, Gaston, Tilghman 
Associate Professors: Ord, Richter 
Clinical Associate Professors: Ashman, Stan- 
ford 

Assistant Professor: Eisen 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Di Fabio, Exler, 
Goldbeck, Kogan, Lauttman, Nessif, Raksin 

In the first year students are introduced to oral 
and maxillofacial surgery with lectures on the 
management o{ medical emergencies. Introduc- 
tory material on minor oral and maxillofacial 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



surgery, and lectures and demonstrations in local 
anesthesia are presented during the second year. 

Third- and fourth-year lectures cover all phases 
of oral and maxillofacial surgery and advanced 
pain and anxiety control. Students are rotated to 
the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in 
block assignments during the third and fourth 
years for progressive participation in oral surgery 
procedures. 

Fourth-year students are scheduled on block as- 
signments to the hospital for hospital dentistry, 
operating room experience and general anesthesia 
experience; they also take night calls with the 
oral and maxillofacial surgery and general practice 
residents. 

The department participates in all years of the 
Conjoint Sciences program concentrating in the 
fourth year on recognition and management of 
medical emergencies in the dental office. Re- 
search is conducted in the evaluation of non- 
steroidal analgesics for postsurgical pain control, 
on the immunologic response of tumor cells in an- 
imals, and on bone healing in cooperative studies 
with MIEMSS orthopedic surgery service. 
DSUR 512. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (1) 
DSUR 522. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (1) 
DSUR 538. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (3) 
DSUR 548. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (7) 



course taught in conjunction with the Depart- 
ment of Oral Pathology, introduces the second- 
year student to oral diagnosis through didactic 
presentations concerning the patient interview, 
clinical examination, oral radiology and treatment 
planning. Clinical aspects of the course are taught 
in the second, third and fourth years. 

Principles of oral medicine and diagnosis are 
taught in the third and fourth years clinically and 
didactically. These courses reinforce the concept 
that the dentist should receive adequate training 
in obtaining medical histories, performing appro- 
priate physical examinations, interpreting the re- 
sults of various laboratory tests and, most impor- 
tantly, relating the physical status of the patient 
to the dental treatment plan. 

The department conducts research in dental 
management of medically compromised patients, 
prevention of infection in immuno-compromised 
patients, prevention of bacterial endocarditis, 
evaluation of drugs to treat bacterial and fungal 
infections of the oral cavity and the role of viruses 
in cancer and its treatment. 
DP AT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 
DIAG 538. Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sci- 
ences (7) 

DIAG 548. Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sci- 
ences (4) 



ORAL MEDICINE AND DIAGNOSTIC 

SCIENCES 

Chairman: C. Daniel Overholser 

Professors: Hasler, Overholser 

Associate Professors: DePaola, Meiller, J. Park 

Dental School Associate Professor: Brown 

Clinical Associate Professor: Friedman 

Assistant Professors: Balciunas, M. Siegel 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Garber, Lee, 

Weiner 

Clinical Instructors: Brooks, Dailey, Katz, 

Kreiner, Manson, Meeks, Palmer, Pannebaker, 

Saedi 

Associate Staff: Akuffo 

The curriculum in oral medicine and diagnosis in- 
cludes the basic principles of the patient inter- 
view, the fundamentals of physical examination, 
recognition of oral disease, treatment planning, 
and the management of patients with oral and/or 
systemic disease. 

Principles of Biomedicine, an interdisciplinary 



ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Chairman: John J. Sauk 

Professor: Sauk 

Associate Professors: Archibald, Beckerman, 

Levy, Swancar 

Associate Staff: Hebert 

The predoctoral teaching program consists of 
an interdisciplinary course that covers the basic 
principles of pathology and medicine through 
presentation of the morphologic, chemical and 
physiologic changes of basic disease processes and 
important specific diseases. Emphasis is placed on 
the diagnosis, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical 
manifestations of disease processes in the oral cav- 
ity. The aim is to provide a sound basis for the dif- 
ferential diagnosis of oral lesions and a rationale 
for their treatment. The student is provided ample 
opportunity to develop proficiency in problem 
solving in oral diagnosis. A variety of techniques 
for examination and diagnosis are covered, in- 
cluding dental radiography. 



18 . DENTAL SCHOOL 



The department presents courses for postgradu- 
ate students and offers graduate programs leading 
to a master's or doctoral degree. Research and 
graduate training are conducted in the pathobiol- 
ogy of connective tissues, stress proteins and the 
virology and immune response to HIV-I (AIDS 
virus). Also graduate training programs are of- 
fered in surgical and clinical oral pathology. 
DP AT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 




ORTHODONTICS 

Chairman: William M. Davidson 

Professor: Davidson 

Clinical Professor: Smith 

Associate Professors: Josell, Rekow 

Clinical Associate Professors: Pavlick, Williams 

Visiting Clinical Associate Professor: Kim 

Assistant Professor: Shroff 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Apicella, Branoff, 

Long, Markin, Park, Rubier, Scornavacca, Siegel, 

Sweren, Weisberg 

Clinical Instructors: Demas, Durkee, Jenkins, 

Kearns, Luposello, Maro, Naghdi, Sebastien, Sel- 

nick, Switzer, Wood 

Associate Staff: Lawson 

The predoctoral program of instruction in ortho- 
dontics is directed toward providing the dental 
student with the knowledge and skills necessary to 
recognize an established or developing malocclu- 
sion, provide preventive and therapeutic treat- 
ment within the scope of the general dental prac- 
tice, consult as a team member with the specialist, 
refer cases requiring specialist care as appropriate 
and coordinate comprehensive care of the patient. 
Instruction in orthodontics occurs during all 
four years of the dental program. Didactic and lab- 
oratory exercises provide a strong foundation for 



delivery of limited orthodontic treatment as part 
of an adult and child patient's comprehensive 
dental care. Elective and clerkship opportunities 
are available for those who wish to pursue addi- 
tional course work and clinical experience. 

The department conducts research in growth 
and development, experimental and diagnostic 
imaging, the biology of tooth movement, proper- 
ties and bio-compatibility of orthodontic materi- 
als and the physiology of facial musculature. 
ORTH 522. Orthodontics (1) 
ORTH 538. Orthodontics (2) 
ORTH 548. Orthodontics (2) 



PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 

Chairman: James T. Rule 

Professors: Abrams, Minah, Rule, Wagner 

Clinical Professor: Kihn 

Associate Professors: Josell, Owen, Shelton 

Clinical Associate Professors: Balis, Coll, Schulz 

Assistant Professor: O'Connell 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Ackerman, 

Crafton, Gierlach, Ginsberg, Lewis, Miller 

The primary introduction to dentistry for children 
begins in the third year through didactic instruc- 
tion and clinical experiences and continues dur- 
ing the fourth year of the dental program. The de- 
partment also presents lectures and laboratory 
projects and participates in Conjoint Sciences 
during the first two years. Particular attention is 
devoted to diagnosis and treatment planning, pre- 
ventive procedures including fluoride therapy and 
sealants, non-punitive patient management tech- 
niques, treatment of traumatic injuries to the pri- 
mary and young permanent dentition, restorative 
procedures in primary teeth, pulpal therapy and 
interceptive orthodontics. Departmental educa- 
tional goals are established enabling graduates to 
provide comprehensive dental care for the young 
patients while encouraging the development of a 
positive attitude toward dental care. 

Research efforts are devoted to the study of flu- 
orides and their effect on dental materials, biolog- 
ical markers in tooth ring analysis and evaluation 
of therapeutic agents by means of clinical trials. 
PEDS 522. Pediatric Dentistry (1) 
PEDS 538. Pediatric Dentistry (8) 
PEDS 548. Pediatric Dentistry (6) 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM. 19 



PERIODONTICS 

Chairman: John J. Bergquist 
Professors: Bergquist, G. Bowers, Hawley, Ran- 
ney 

Clinical Professors: Halpert, Zupnik 
Research Professors: Boughman, Suzuki 
Associate Professor: Serio 

Clinical Associate Professors: Lever, Plessett, 
Winson 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Bowen, Feldman, 
Freilich, Gher, Kassolis, Lazzaro, Morrison, S. 
Park, Passaro, Phillips, Rethman, Rosen, Sachs, 
Sindler, Trail, Welch, Zeren 
Research Assistant Professors: Agarwal, J. Bow- 
ers 

Instructor: Hatfield 

Clinical Instructors: Arceo, Barnes, Clary, Cur- 
ley, Friedman, Haines, Hooper, Maltz, Odell, 
Robson, Smith, L. Tewes, Warren, Wellejus 

Students are introduced to fundamental periodon- 
tics in lectures during the first and second years; 
clinical experience begins in the first year of the 
dental program. In the third year, students have 
didactic exposure to advanced periodontal proce- 
dures. Third- and fourth-year students enter into a 
learning contract that delineates a set of basic 
minimum clinical experiences. Interested students 
have the opportunity to choose from a broad 
range of additional experiences and to contract 
for both additional experiences and the grade the 
student feels these experiences warrant. Thus, in- 
dividual students have substantial involvement in 
establishing their educational goals. 

The department conducts research in regenera- 
tive therapy, neutrophil chemotaxis, genetics, 
chemotherapeutic agents, connective tissue me- 
tabolism, disease detection, implantology and 
education. 

PERI 518. Periodontics (2) 
PERI 528. Periodontics (2) 
PERI 538. Periodontics (11) 
PERI 548. Periodontics (11) 



PHARMACOLOGY 

Chairman: Richard L. Wynn 
Professors: Thut, Wynn 
Research Professor: Rudo 
Associate Professor: Crossley 



The program of instruction in pharmacology is di- 
vided into three phases. The first phase includes a 
thorough study of the basic concepts and princi- 
ples in pharmacology. Emphasis is placed on the 
mechanisms of action, absorption, distribution, 
metabolism and excretion of drugs, therapeutic 
indications, common adverse reactions and drug 
interactions. The second phase teaches oral thera- 
peutics, drug interactions and pain and anxiety 
control through departmental participation in the 
Conjoint Sciences program. The third phase, 
designed for graduate and postdoctoral students, 
provides in-depth coverage of current topics in 
analgesia, local and general anesthesia, dental 
therapeutics and dental toxicology. The depart- 
ment conducts research and graduate training in 
neuropharmacology relating to analgesia, general 
anesthesia and skeletal muscle relaxants. 
DPHR 521. General Pharmacology and Thera- 
peutics (5) 




PHYSIOLOGY 

Chairman: Leslie C. Costello 

Professors: Costello, Franklin 

Clinical Professor: Buxbaum 

Associate Professors: Capra, Myslinski 

Assistant Professors: Bennett, Dessem, Urbaitis 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Chaudhari, 

Parente 

Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor: Hendler 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Gaston 

Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor: Iglarsh 

The Department of Physiology offers both predoc- 
toral and graduate programs. The predoctoral 
course stresses the basic principles of physiology 
and provides the student with knowledge of the 



20- DENTAL SCHOOL 



function of the principal organ systems of the 
body. Dentally oriented aspects of physiology are 
taught through departmental participation in the 
Conjoint Sciences program. The department also 
presents courses for graduate and postgraduate stu- 
dents and offers graduate programs leading to the 
master's and doctoral degrees and a combined 
D.D.S./Ph.D. for students interested in careers in 
teaching and research. 

The department conducts research and gradu- 
ate training in oral neurophysiology, craniofacial 
pain, cardiopulmonary physiology, endocrinology 
and reproduction, and renal physiology. 
DPHS 512. Principles of Physiology (5) 

RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 
Interim Chairman: Michael Conway 
Professors: Reese, Thompson 
Associate Professors: Buchness, Litkowski, 
Strassler, Wood 

Dental School Associate Professors: Baer, Brad- 
bury, Conway, Eastwood, Elias, Faraone, Gunder- 
son, T. Miller, Stevens 

Clinical Associate Professors: Drum, Feldman, 
Greenbaum, Griswold, Iddings, Mort, Whitaker 
Dental School Assistant Professors: Gerhardt, 
Payne, Wood 

Clinical Assistant Professors: N. Chu, K. Chu, 
Davliakos, I. S. Fried, Inge, Kristallis, Progebin, 
Prymas, Sachs, Schlobohm, Schwartz, Vanden- 
bosche, Vera, Zeller 
Instructor: Hack 

Clinical Instructors: Blum, Chester, Garcia, 
Junghans, Kilian, Levickas, Mastella, Morgan, 
Oates, Pohlhaus, Pupkin, RuDusky, Ruliffson, 
Scaggs, S. Siegel, Tate, Vail, Vu, Wealcatch 
Associate Staff: Baier, Dempsey, King, Suls 

The Department of Restorative Dentistry is re- 
sponsible for major segments of the curriculum re- 
lated to dental anatomy, occlusion, dental materi- 
als, operative dentistry, and fixed and removable 
prosthodontics. 

The curriculum in the first and second years 
concentrates on methods and materials used to re- 
store and replace missing teeth. The preventive 
dimension of restorative care and treatment plan- 
ning are emphasized as well. During this period, 
limited but increasing clinical experience, with 
close faculty supervision, augments and reinforces 
the didactic foundation. Instruction includes lec- 



tures, seminars, self- instructional programs, labo- 
ratory exercises and clinical simulation. 

In the third and fourth year, lectures and semi- 
nars support comprehensive clinical treatment of 
patients in restorative dentistry. Clerkships are of- 
fered in the fourth year to students who demon- 
strate unusual skill in the restorative area. Occlu- 
sion and dental materials are again addressed in 
Conjoint Sciences. 

Departmental research includes adhesive bond- 
ing to tissues and restorative materials, long term 
clinical evaluation of "Maryland" bridges, control- 
ling tooth sensitivity, evaluation of physical prop- 
erties of numerous dental materials, evaluation of 
osseo- integrated implants, infection control and 
computer aided design and manufacture of cast 
restorations. 

REST 511. Dental Anatomy/Occlusion (4) 
REST 512. Operative Dentistry (5) 
REST 518. Dental Biomaterials I (2) 
REST 522. Dental Biomaterials II (1) 
REST 528. Fixed Prosthodontics (6) 
REST 529. Removable Prosthodontics (6) 
REST 538 A. Operative Dentistry (7) 
REST 538B. Fixed Prosthodontics (6) 
REST 538C. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 
REST 548 A. Operative Dentistry (5) 
REST 548B. Fixed Prosthodontics (10) 
REST 548C. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 




THE DENTAL PROGRAM. 21 



Dental Hygiene Programs 




Acting Chairman: Linda DeVore 

Associate Professor: DeVore, Fried, Parker, 

Samuels 

Assistant Professor: Barata 

Dental School Assistant Professor: Carr 

Clinical Instructors: Gillis, Slotke 

Academic Advisors: 

Carr (Preprofessional B.S. Program) 
DeVore (Degree Completion B.S. Program) 
DeVore (Graduate Program) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Dental School offers both a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence and a Master of Science degree in dental 
hygiene. The baccalaureate degree can be earned 
in one of two educational programs: the Prepro- 
fessional/Professional Program and the Degree 
Completion Program. The objective of both 
baccalaureate programs is to develop in the stu- 
dents the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values 
needed to assume positions of responsibility in a 
variety of health care, educational, research and 
community settings. In addition, these programs 
are designed to provide a foundation for graduate 
study in dental hygiene or related disciplines. In- 
formation about the graduate program in dental 
hygiene begins on page 28. 

The dental hygienist, as a member of the oral 
health care team, strives to improve oral health by 
providing preventive and educational services to 
the public. Clinical dental hygiene services in- 
clude assessing patients' general and oral health 
status, removing deposits and stains from teeth, 
taking dental x-rays and applying fluorides and 
sealants. Educational and management services 
for individuals and/or groups may include provid- 
ing nutritional and oral hygiene counseling; con- 
ducting educational programs; and planning, im- 
plementing and evaluating community oral health 
programs. 

Employment Opportunities in Dental Hygiene. 
The majority of dental hygienists are employed in 
private dental offices. However, there are increas- 
ing opportunities for those with baccalaureate and 
graduate degrees in dental hygiene education; 
community, school and public health programs; 
private and public institutions; armed forces; re- 
search; and other special areas of practice. 

Current dental hygiene graduates working full 
time can anticipate initial annual income of ap- 



22 • DENTAL ^< HOOl 



proximately $35,000, depending on the area, re- 
sponsibilities, type of practice and general eco- 
nomic conditions. 

PREPROFESSIONAL/PROFESSIONAL 
BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

This program consists of two main parts: a two- 
year preprofessional curriculum at one of the three 
University of Maryland campuses (College Park, 
Baltimore County or Eastern Shore) or at another 
accredited college or university, and a two-or 
three-year professional curriculum at the Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

Two-Year Preprofessional Curriculum 

A listing of the courses and credit hour require- 
ments for the preprofessional curriculum follows. 
These courses provide a foundation in basic sci- 
ences, social sciences and general education. It is 
recommended that students meet with the dental 
hygiene advisor each semester to ensure appropri- 
ate course scheduling. 



Courses 


English Composition 


6 


*Inorganic Chemistry 


4 


*Organic Chemistry 


4 


General Zoology or Biology 


4 


General Psychology 


3 


General Sociology 


3 


Public Speaking 


3 


*Human Anatomy and Physiology 


8 


*Microbiology 


4 


Principles of Nutrition 


3 


**Humanities 


6 


***Social Sciences 


6 


Statistics 


3 


Electives 


3 



60 
These courses must include a laboratory and meet the re- 
quirements for science majors. Survey or terminal 
courses for non-science majors are not acceptable for 
transfer. 
'*Humanities: Courses must be selected from the following 
areas: literature, philosophy, history, fine arts, speech, 
math or language. 
**Social Sciences: General psychology and sociology tire 
required; the remaining six credits should be selected 
from courses in psychology, sociology, computer science, 
government and politics, or anthropology 






Application and Admission Procedures 

High school students who wish to enroll in the 
preprofessional curriculum should request applica- 
tions directly from the admissions office of the 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742; the University of Maryland Baltimore 
County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, Catonsville, 
Maryland 21228; or the University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853; 
or any accredited college or university. 

It is recommended that those preparing for a 
baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene pursue an 
academic program in high school which includes 
courses in biology, chemistry, algebra and social 



TWO- AND THREE-YEAR PROFESSIONAL 
CURRICULA 

Two-Year Professional Curriculum 

The professional curriculum includes clinical and 
didactic courses in the Dental School. Through- 
out these two years, dental hygiene students work 
concurrently with dental students to provide pa- 
tient care. 

During the first year, students expand upon 
their preprofessional basic science knowledge as it 
pertains to dental hygiene practice. In a clinical 
setting, the students begin to develop the skills, 
knowledge and judgment necessary to collect data 
for patient treatment; assess each patient's oral 
health status; and select and provide preventive 
and educational services, based on the individual 
needs of the patient. 

During the second year, students demonstrate 
increasing proficiency and self-direction in assess- 
ing patients' oral health status, planning and pro- 
viding preventive services and identifying the 
need for consultation and referral. To enrich 
their educational experiences, students provide 
educational and/or clinical services in a variety of 
community settings, such as hospitals; schools; 
and facilities for the handicapped, chronically ill 
and aged. They also have an opportunity to work 
with dental students as primary providers for the 
physically disabled, mentally handicapped and 
individuals with serious medical conditions or 
infectious diseases. Senior students also take 
courses in education, research and management 
which enable them to develop fundamental skills 



that are necessary for various career options 
within the profession. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



CREDIT 



Semester 1 



Prevention and Control of Oral 

Disease I 6 

Periodontics for the Dental Hygienist I 2 

Oral Biology 7 

Education and Treatment Planning 



Strategies 


2 




17 




Semester 2 


Prevention and Control of Oral 




Diseases II 


5 


Periodontics for the Dental Hygienist 


II 2 


Educational Program Development 


3 


Care and Management of the 




Special Patient 


2 


Methods and Materials in 




Dentistry 


3 


General Pharmacology and Therapeutics 3 


Oral Radiology 


2 




20 


SENIOR YEAR 


CREDIT 



Semester I 



Advanced Clinical Practice I 


5 


Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 




Practice I 


3 


Community Service I 


1 


Community Oral Health 


3 


Introduction to Oral Health Research 


2 




14 




Semester 2 


Advanced Clinical Practice II 


5 


Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 




Practice II 


2 


Community Service II (optional) 


1 


Issues in Health Care Delivery- 


3 


Health Care Management 


2 




12 or 13 



Three-Year Professional Curriculum Option 

Although most students complete the professional 
curriculum in two years as outlined, a three-year 
professional curriculum option is offered. This 
three-year plan is a modification in the sequence 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS* 23 



and number of professional courses taken each se- 
mester. This curriculum can be an attractive op- 
tion for students who may wish to lighten their 
academic load due to family or work commit- 
ments; or for students who are otherwise eligible 
to enter at the junior level but have not yet suc- 
cessfully completed all of the required preprofes- 
sional courses. Students admitted to this curricu- 
lum must have the recommendation of the 
program advisor and approval of the admissions 
committee. Students enrolled in this curriculum 
may not have full-time status for one or more se- 
mesters of the program. This may influence their 
eligibility for certain scholarships and student in- 
surance discounts. 




Application and Admission Procedures 

College students enrolled in the preprofessional 
curriculum should communicate regularly with 
the dental hygiene advisor at the Dental School 
to ensure that the courses selected satisfy the de- 
gree requirements. After completion of two se- 
mesters of the preprofessional curriculum, students 
may request an application from the Office of 
Records and Registration, 621 West Lombard 
Street, Room 326, University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201; or from the 
Office of Admissions and Recruitment of the 
Dental School. Applications for the Baltimore 
campus should be received no later than April 1 
prior to the fall semester for which the student 
wishes to enroll. 

A minimum grade point average of 2.3 in the 
preprofessional curriculum is recommended and 
preference will be given to those students who 
have high scholastic averages, especially in sci- 
ence courses. 



Enrollment at another University of Maryland 
campus or completion of the preprofessional cur- 
riculum does not guarantee admission to the pro- 
fessional curriculum at the Dental School. Enroll- 
ment in the dental hygiene program is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be re- 
quired to send a deposit of $200 with a letter of 
intent to enroll. This deposit will be credited to- 
ward tuition at registration, but will not be re- 
funded in the event of failure to enroll. 

Projected Average Expenditures 

In addition to the expenses of tuition and fees 
which are listed on page 40, junior dental hygiene 
students should estimate spending $1,400 on in- 
strument service, uniforms and supplies and $600 
on textbooks. Senior dental hygiene students 
should estimate spending $1,050 on instrument 
service and supplies, $300 on textbooks and $500 
on regional and national board examination fees. 
Field experiences in both the junior and senior 
years may entail additional costs for travel and/or 
meals at sites outside the Dental School. 



(graduation Requirements 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
dental hygiene must complete the preprofessional 
and the professional curricula as outlined. Stu- 
dents must achieve a cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 2.0 and complete a total of 123 credits to be 
eligible for graduation. 

National and Regional Board Examinations 

Clinical and comprehensive written examinations 
are given in the spring of the senior year. Success- 
ful completion of these exams is necessary to ob- 
tain a license to practice dental hygiene. 

Courses 

DHYG 311. Prevention and Control of Oral 
Disease I (6). The study of the morphologic 
characteristics and physiologic relationships of 
teeth and supporting structures; and the basic 
foundation for clinical dental hygiene practice are 
presented in lectures, class discussions and audio- 
visual presentations. Simulation and clinical 
experiences provide the opportunity for practical 
application of the principles and procedures for 



24 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



the identification, prevention and control of oral 
diseases. 

DHYG 312. Oral Biology (7). The study of em- 
bryology and histology; anatomy and physiology; 
microbiology; pathology with emphasis on the 
head, neck and oral cavity; and the basic princi- 
ples of radiology are presented in lecture, labora- 
tory and audiovisual format. 

DHYG 313. Education and Treatment Planning 
Strategies (2). The study of the elements of hu- 
man behavior, principles of learning, methods of 
teaching and principles of communication as they 
relate to teaching oral health care to individuals 
and groups. Classroom discussions, small group ac- 
tivities and clinical experiences provide the op- 
portunity for application of these topics. 

DHYG 314. Periodontics for the Dental Hy- 
gienist I (2). The study of the etiology, diagnosis 
and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases as well as 
the anatomy and morphology of the tooth root 
and surrounding supportive structures are pre- 
sented in lecture and laboratory sessions. 

DHYG 321. Prevention and Control of Oral 
Diseases II (5). The study of principles and pro- 
cedures for the prevention of oral disease includ- 
ing dental health education, oral hygiene mea- 
sures, dietary control of dental disease, use of 
fluorides and the oral prophylaxis. Students work 
closely with dental students to simulate the post- 
graduation team delivery of dental care. 

DHYG 322. Community Oral Health (3). 

Methods of determining community oral health 
status, identifying barriers to optimum health, and 
selecting appropriate barrier interventions are pre- 
sented concurrently with community program 
planning activities. Throughout the course, the 
role of the dental hygienist in community oral 
health is emphasized. 

DHYG 323. Care and Management of the Spe- 
cial Patient (2). Through classroom discussion, 
reading assignments, independent study, group 
projects and community involvement, the dental 
hygiene student will develop a philosophy for the 
care and management of special patients for 
whom routine care may be complicated by age or 
unusual health factors. 



DHYG 324. Methods and Materials in Den- 
tistry (3). An introduction to the science of den- 
tal materials, including the composition and uti- 
lization of dental materials as they apply to 
clinical dental hygiene procedures, dental assist- 
ing and patient education, is presented in lecture, 
class discussion and laboratory format. 

DPHR 325. General Pharmacology and Oral 
Therapeutics (3). The study of drugs and their 
use in the treatment, diagnosis and prevention of 
disease; the absorption, distribution, metabolism, 
excretion and mechanism of action of drugs; and 
drug interactions, rationale for use, indications 
and contraindications are presented in lecture and 
class discussion format. Emphasis is placed on the 
relevance of this information to providing patient 
care. 

DHYG 326. Oral Radiology (2). By means of 
lecture, laboratory and clinic activities, the stu- 
dents are introduced to the science of ionizing ra- 
diation; the production and effects of x-rays; and 
the various techniques of oral roentgenography. 
Students gain experience exposing, processing, 
mounting, assessing the diagnostic quality of and 
interpreting radiographs. The rationale and prac- 
tices to insure radiation safety are stressed 
throughout the course. 

DHYG 327. Periodontics for the Dental Hy- 
gienist II (2). The study of the diseases of the 
periodontium focusing on the management, thera- 
peutics and prevention of periodontal diseases 
is presented through lecture and classroom 
discussion. 

DHYG 411-421. Advanced Clinical Practice I 

and II (5-5). Clinical experiences in principles 
and procedures of dental hygiene practice are pro- 
vided in simulated general dentistry settings 
through a concurrent patient treatment program 
with dental students. Students have the opportu- 
nity to experience and participate in alternative 
practice settings through block assignments to 
dental specialty clinics within the school. 

DHYG 412. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 
Practice I (3). Senior students have the opportu- 
nity to explore advanced principles and skills of 
dental hygiene practice. The primary focus of the 
course is divided into three major units: pain con- 
trol, advanced periodontics and myo-oral facial 




DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS. 25 



pain. Also included in the course is an introduc- 
tion to intra-oral photography and case documen- 
tation. The emphasis of this course is to broaden 
the student's perspective of dental hygiene prac- 
tice as it exists across the country. 

DHYG 422. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 
Practice II (2). This course provides an applica- 
tion of principles and concepts for the planning 
and development of the student's professional sat- 
isfaction and security. To prepare students for the 
challenge of professional career development, 
such issues as career planning, continuing educa- 
tion, dental hygiene business practices and profes- 
sional organizations are included. 




DHYG 413-423. Community Service I and II 
(1-1). The externship program provides opportu- 
nities for senior students to select experiences be- 
yond those given within the Dental School set- 
ting. The selection of the community site is based 
on the student's interests and career goals. Sites 
include well-baby clinics, prenatal clinics, com- 
munity health centers, nursing homes, senior citi- 
zen centers, facilities for the handicapped, hospi- 
tals, military clinics and schools, day care centers, 
public health department and research centers. 
(DHYG 423 is optional.) 

DHYG 414. Educational Program Development 
(3). Students in this course have the opportunity 
to explore various ways in which effective instruc- 
tional skills may contribute to a career in dental 
hygiene. Learning experiences are designed to en- 
able the student to develop these skills and to pro- 
ject their application in such areas as public 



school systems, community health programs, 
higher education and consumer education. 

DHYG 416. Introduction to Oral Health Re- 
search (2). This course is designed to acquaint 
students with research methodology and its appli- 
cation to the dental hygiene profession. Emphasis 
will be placed upon: heightening student aware- 
ness of the need for dental hygiene research; de- 
veloping student capabilities to identify research 
problems and design and execute meaningful re- 
search studies; and enabling students to accurately 
appraise the quality of research reports. 

DHYG 424. Special Topics (1). Students are 
provided an opportunity to pursue in-depth topics 
of special interest. The program of study is de- 
signed by each student and approved by faculty 
prior to the beginning of the course. The study 
program may relate to an area of interest in clini- 
cal dental hygiene, education, management or re- 
search and may consist of special reading assign- 
ments, reports, conferences, and possibly clinic, 
laboratory or extramural experience. (Optional) 

DHYG 425. Issues in Health Care Delivery 

(3). By means of lecture, discussion and small 
group activities, students examine and analyze the 
issues that affect the broad spectrum of health 
care delivery. Topics of interest include ethics and 
professional responsibility, inequities in health 
care delivery, delivery systems in other countries, 
profiteering in health care delivery and profes- 
sional rivalry. 

DHYG 427. Health Care Management (2). By 
means of lecture, discussion and small group activ- 
ities, students are introduced to skills essential for 
effective health care management. Areas of em- 
phasis include women in management, managerial 
planning and decision making, fiscal control and 
grantsmanship. Management principles are 
applied to dental and other health care delivery 
settings. 



DEGREE COMPLETION BACCALAUREATE 
PROGRAM 

The degree completion program provides the op- 
portunity for registered dental hygienists who hold 
a certificate or associate degree to pursue studies 



DENTAL SCHOOL 



leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in dental 
hygiene. The curriculum is designed in two phases 
of full- or part-time study to meet each individ- 
ual's academic, clinical and career interests. 




?5. 




Program Requirements 

Phase I: General Requirements. Phase I consists of 
the student's previous dental hygiene courses and 
general course requirements, totaling 90 semester 
credits. General course requirements for the bac- 
calaureate degree may be taken at any one of the 
three University of Maryland campuses (College 
Park, Baltimore County or Eastern Shore) or at 
another accredited college or university. The 
courses required are the same as those listed in the 
Preprofessional Program freshman and sophomore 
years, except only one chemistry course is 
required. Transfer credits are granted for dental 
hygiene courses from an accredited program. To 
obtain transfer credit, students must attain a grade 
of C or better in all courses taken at an institution 
outside the Maryland state university sys- 
tem. Consultation with the completion pro- 
gram coordinator regarding transfer courses is 
recommended. 

Phase II: Degree Completion Requirements. The de- 
gree completion program at the Dental School 
consists of two core seminars (DHYG 410, 420) 
totaling four credit hours; senior level didactic 
courses, totaling 14 credit hours (DHYG 412, 414, 
415, 424, 425 and 426); and 12 credit hours of 
academic electives, generally taken at another 
campus. A variable credit practicum course, 
DHYG 418-428, may be taken for elective credit. 



Curriculum Planning 

Registered dental hygienists should submit to the 
degree completion program advisor transcripts 
from their dental hygiene program and all other 
institutions attended, so that transfer credits may 
be evaluated and a program developed to satisfy 
remaining requirements. Students should meet 
regularly with the advisor to ensure appropriate 
course scheduling in Phase I. 

Application and Admission Procedures 

In addition to meeting the general course require- 
ments, the student applying for admission to the 
degree completion program at the Dental School 
must: 

1. Be a graduate of an accredited dental hygiene 
program; 

2. Be licensed in at least one state. 

3. Have a minimum grade point average of 2.5. 
Applications for admission may be obtained 

from the Office of Records and Registration, Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore, 621 West Lom- 
bard Street, Room 326, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. Applications should be received no later 
than April 1 prior to the fall semester for which 
the student wishes to enroll. 

Enrollment at another University of Maryland 
campus does not guarantee admission to the de- 
gree completion program at the Dental School. 
Enrollment in the degree completion program is 
limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be re- 
quired to send a deposit of $200 with a letter of 
intent to enroll. This deposit will be credited to- 
ward tuition at registration, but will not be re- 
funded in the event of failure to enroll. 

Student Expenses 

Tuition and fees are listed on page 40. Charges for 
instrument service, supplies, uniforms and text- 
books are not applicable for degree completion 
students. Costs in these categories would be con- 
siderably lower, with minimal expenses for instru- 
ments and supplies. 

Qraduation Requirements 

One hundred twenty (120) semester credit hours 
are required for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
the degree completion dental hygiene program. 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS. 27 



The last 30 credit hours toward the baccalaureate 
degree must be taken at the University of Mary- 
land. Courses not offered at the Dental School 
will be taken at another University of Maryland 
campus. 

Courses 

See pages 25-26 for course descriptions of DHYG 
412, 414, 416, 424, 425 and 427. 

DHYG 410-420. Seminar in Dental Hygiene 
(3-1) (degree completion only). Reinforcement, 
updating and expansion of dental hygiene profes- 
sional skills, knowledge and attitudes. Topic areas 
which are explored through seminar, laboratory 
and extramural formats include dental public 
health, preventive dentistry, process of dental hy- 
giene care and options for dental hygiene practice. 
Emphasis is placed on developing oral and written 
communication skills necessary for the dental 
hygienist in a variety of health care, educational, 
research or community settings. 

DHYG 418-428. Dental Hygiene Practicum 

(1-4/1-4)*. Individually designed didactic and/or 
clinical experiences in a special area of dental hy- 
giene clinical practice, teaching, community den- 
tal health or research. 

* Elective variable credit course that requires approval 
of degree completion program coordinator. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM 

The Master of Science degree program in dental 
hygiene is designed to prepare dental hygienists 
to assume positions of authority and responsibility 
beyond those assumed by the graduate with a 
baccalaureate degree and to provide a foundation 
for those who wish to pursue a doctoral degree. 
The program's approach to learning is student- 
centered, individualized and flexible. The faculty 
is committed to developing creative professionals 
who assess and direct their own performance. 
Self-evaluation and self-direction are encouraged 
throughout the program. Students have the 
opportunity to share their experiences, knowl- 
edge and skills, work cooperatively with col- 
leagues and explore a variety of resources to help 
them reach their maximum potential as health 
care professionals. 



DENTAL SCHOOL 



Program concentrations include education, 
management and community/institutional health. 
Students in the health concentration may choose 
to focus on acute hospital care or chronic/geriatric 
care. Within each concentration, practical career- 
oriented applications of knowledge and theory are 
emphasized. 

TKe Curriculum 

Full-time students can expect to complete the 
graduate program in 12 to 15 months. Part-time 
students usually spend 24 to 30 months in the 
program. Based on their career interests, students 
may select the thesis or the non-thesis option. 
Students in the thesis track must complete a total 
of 30 semester credits to graduate; those in the 
non-thesis track, 34 credits. Under the guidance 
of a committee, thesis students design, implement, 
evaluate and orally defend a research project for a 
total of six credits of master's thesis. Non-thesis 
students, under the guidance of primary and sec- 
ondary readers, submit and defend a scholarly 
paper. Students selecting the non-thesis option 
are required to gain applied research experience 
by participating in an established or developing 
research project. 

Dental Hygiene Core Requirements 







Non- 




Thesis 


Thesis 




Option 


Option 


Educational Program Development 


3 


3 


Health Care Management 


2 


2 


Literature Review and Evaluation 






for Dental Hygienists 


3 


3 


Research Design and Methodology 


3 


3 


Area of Concentration Practicum 


4 


4 


Master's Thesis/Research or 






Research Practicum 


6 


3 


Electives 


9 


16 


Total 


30 


34 



Electives 

Electives may be chosen from the courses offered 
by the schools and departments at any of the 
three University of Maryland campuses in Balti- 
more, Baltimore County and College Park. Elec- 
tives that apply to the concentrations of teaching, 






management and community/institutional health 
must be approved by the student's faculty advisor 
prior to registration. 

Expenses and Financial Assistance 

Tuition is $150 per credit hour for in-state resi- 
dents and $276 per credit hour for non-residents. 
Additional fees are charged for some student ser- 
vices. Financial aid, in the form of loans, grants 
and work study is awarded on the basis of demon- 
strated need. A limited number of part-time grad- 
uate teaching positions are available through the 
department, and university fellowships are avail- 
able from the graduate school. Part-time employ- 
ment opportunities for dental hygiene practice are 
excellent in the community. 

Admission and Application Procedures 

Admission to graduate study is the exclusive re- 
sponsibility of the University of Maryland Gradu- 
ate School, Baltimore. The minimum standard for 
admission is a B average, or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, as 
an undergraduate student in a program of study 
leading to a baccalaureate degree. Students who 
fail to meet these minimum requirements may be 
admitted to graduate study as provisional students. 
Applicants must be graduates of an accredited 
program in dental hygiene and possess a baccalau- 
reate degree in dental hygiene or a related field. A 
personal interview with the program director is 
strongly recommended. 

Three copies of the application for admission, 
three letters of recommendation and two sets of 
official transcripts from each college or university 
attended must be received by the University of 
Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore, by April 1 
for admission in the fall semester and by October 1 
for admission in the spring semester. 

Core Courses 

DHYG 414. Educational Program Development 
(3). Students explore ways in which effective in- 
structional skills may be used by dental hygienists 
in such areas as public school systems, community 
health programs, higher education and consumer 
education. 

DHYG 426. Health Care Management (2). 
Through lecture, discussion and small group activ- 
ities, students are introduced to skills essential for 



effective health care management. Areas of em- 
phasis include women in management, managerial 
planning and decision- making, fiscal control 
and grantsmanship. Management principles are 
applied to dental and other health care delivery 
settings. 




DHYG 601. Seminar: Literature Review and 
Evaluation for Dental Hygienists (3). Through 
an analysis and critique of literature pertinent to 
the dental hygienist, students examine biological 
and clinical, research and political, sociological 
and educational trends that influence den- 
tal hygiene. Unanswered research questions are 
identified. 

DHYG 799. Master's Thesis Research (6). 

NURS 701. Research Methods and Materials 

(3). In one four-hour lecture/lab a week, basic un- 
derstanding of the philosophy of research, the na- 
ture of scientific thinking and methods of research 
study are taught. Prerequisite: Basic Statistics. 



Practicum Options (based on concentration 
selected) 

DHYG 619. Teaching Practicum (2-4). Gradu- 
ate students, working with a faculty advisor, gain 
experience teaching in didactic, clinical and/or 
laboratory settings. An analytical approach to 
teaching effectiveness is emphasized. Placements 
in junior colleges, baccalaureate programs, ele- 
mentary or secondary schools or the Dental 
School are arranged according to each student's 
career goals. 

DHYG 629. Health Care Management Prac- 
ticum (2-4). In cooperation with a faculty advisor, 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS. 29 




graduate students observe and participate in the 
administrative activities of a health care program. 
Placements are arranged to support the student's 
career goals. 

DHYG 639. Advanced Clinical Practice Prac- 
ticum (2-4). Graduate students work with a fac- 
ulty advisor to gain knowledge and experience in 
an advanced clinical area of dental hygiene prac- 
tice, such as nutritional analysis and counseling, 
oro-myofacial pain, periodontics or orthodontics. 

DHYG 649. Research Practicum (2-4). Gradu- 
ate students, working in conjunction with a 
faculty advisor, gain experience in research design 
and implementation by participating in an on- 
going research project of interest to the student. 
Scientific writing experience will be included. 



30 • D E N T A L SCHOOL 



Advanced Education Programs 



GRADUATE EDUCATION 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Sci- 
ence (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 
degrees are offered by the Departments of 
Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Oral 
Pathology and Physiology. A Master of Science 
degree is also offered by the Department of Dental 
Hygiene. The most recent addition to the Den- 
tal School's graduate program is a combined 
D.D.S./Ph.D. in physiology, the purpose of which 
is to train students to become dental researchers 
for careers in academic dentistry. 

Programs are also available for those who wish 
to pursue a graduate degree in one of the basic sci- 
ences concurrently with clinic specialty educa- 
tion. The combined degree/specialty training pro- 
gram generally requires three years for the master's 
degree and five years for the doctorate. These pro- 
grams are highly individualized and are developed 
appropriate to the needs of the candidate. 

A Master of Science in oral biology program is 
available for graduate students who are enrolled in 
the certificate programs in the Dental School or 
any persons holding a D.D.S., D.M.D. or equiva- 
lent degree. The program is a multidisciplinary 
one, in that the graduate courses necessary to sat- 
isfy the requirements of the University of Mary- 
land Graduate School, Baltimore for the master's 
degree are selected from the various departments 
of the university. Students receive training under 
the supervision and direction of a member of the 
graduate faculty. Courses in education have been 
added to various tracks equipping students to be- 
come more effective teachers of their specialties. 

ADVANCED DENTAL EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS 

In 1970, when the Dental School moved into its 
modern facilities, a comprehensive advanced den- 
tal education program was initiated. Over the last 
two decades, the program has continued to evolve 
to meet the demands of the profession. Currently, 
the school offers the following advanced dental 
education programs: 

• Advanced General Dentistry, a one- or two- 
year residency program of dental school-based 
advanced study and practice. 



• General Practice Residency, a one-year pro- 
gram of hospital-based advanced study and 
dental practice. 

• Advanced Education Programs designed to 
provide successful candidates eligibility for ex- 
amination by the appropriate specialty boards 
under the Commission on Dental Accredita- 
tion of the American Dental Association. 
Programs of 24 months each are offered in the 
following disciplines: endodontics, pediatric 
dentistry, periodontics and prosthodontics. 
A program of 36 months' duration is offered 
in orthodontics. The oral and maxillofacial 
surgery program extends over a period of 48 
months. 

Qualified applicants for two-year certificate 
programs may seek dual enrollment as candidates 
in combined certificate/degree programs. Success- 
ful candidates are awarded a certificate of profi- 
ciency in a clinical specialty by the Dental School 
and the degree Master of Science by the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore. 

Applicants for all programs must have a 
D.D.S., D.M.D. or equivalent degree and must 
give evidence of high scholastic standing. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Dental School offers an integrated profes- 
sional development curriculum designed to update, 
refresh and reinforce the professional knowledge 
and skills of practitioners and faculty. The most 
current clinical, biological, social and behavioral 
sciences knowledge is included in the course offer- 
ings. Courses are conducted by the school's fac- 
ulty, visiting faculty and distinguished practition- 
ers from throughout the country. Although 
professional development courses are not in- 
tended as collegiate credit courses, the Continu- 
ing Education Unit (CEU), which equals 10 clock 
hours of formal instruction, is a measurement used 
to verify attendance and participation in these 
activities. 

A significant number of the on-campus courses 
are laboratory or clinical participation courses. 
Off-campus courses are also provided for practi- 
tioners located in suburban and rural areas of the 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS. 31 



Student Life 




STUDENT SERVICES 

Office of Academic and Student Affairs 

The Office of Academic and Student Affairs, un- 
der the direction of the associate dean for aca- 
demic and student affairs, is the source of student 
information about the academic program and is 
the repository for records of student academic 
performance. The policy of the University of 
Maryland regarding access to and release of stu- 
dent data/information may be found in the cur- 
rent UMAB Student Handbook issued to all in- 
coming students. 

A major function of the office is to coordinate 
the academic counseling and guidance programs 
of the school. Departmental academic counseling 
and progress reports are maintained and moni- 
tored. Records concerning counseling, referrals 
and disposition are maintained and serve as a re- 
source for academic evaluation by the faculty and 
administration. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, examination 
schedules and the academic calendar are dissemi- 
nated through this office. Examples of program 
information distributed to students include hand- 
outs about the grading system, course credits, and 
guidelines for the selection of students for clerk- 
ship programs. 

Official class rosters and student personal data 
and address files are maintained by the Office of 
Academic and Student Affairs, which serves as a 
liaison between the Dental School and the uni- 
versity registrar for the coordination of registra- 
tion procedures. 

The office is also responsible for coordination 
of a computerized grading system which (a) pro- 
vides each advancement committee with a com- 
posite report on all students in the class at the 
end of each semester; (b) provides, on request, 
class rankings and other evaluation data; and 
(c) operates in conjunction with the university's 
Office of Records and Registration, which gener- 
ates and distributes individual grade reports, 
maintains the student's permanent record and is- 
sues the official transcript. 

The Office of Academic and Student Affairs 
also is directly or indirectly involved with all as- 
pects of student life and welfare at the Dental 
School, including personal and career counseling 
and student advisory services. 



Students who experience career, health, legal, 
employment, housing and other personal prob- 
lems are counseled by the associate dean for aca- 
demic and student affairs and referred, as neces- 
sary, to the appropriate campus agency or office. 
In addition, counseling concerning specialty 
training, military service, internships, dental edu- 
cation and dental research careers is available to 
predoctoral dental and dental hygiene students 
through the Center for Career Development and 
Placement. 

The associate dean for academic and student 
affairs serves as advisor to all student organiza- 
tions and publications and also assists in the coor- 
dination of joint student-faculty programs (pro- 
fessional, social and cultural). The Student 
Affairs Committee of the Faculty Council, 
chaired by the associate dean, has the major re- 
sponsibility for such programs. 

To effectively conduct all student affairs, the 
Office of Academic and Student Affairs main- 
tains direct liaison with all administrators, as well 
as campus, community and professional organiza- 
tions and agencies. 

Office of Clinical and Hospital Affairs 
All intramural and extramural clinical programs 
of the Dental School are coordinated by the 
Office of Clinical and Hospital Affairs. Major 
functions of this office include coordinating the 
schedules of faculty from the various disciplines 
to each general practice, scheduling the rotation 
of students to special assignments, assigning pa- 
tients to students, maintaining patient records, 
and assuming responsibility for quality assur- 
ance, patient advocacy and clinical information 
management. 

Patient visits to the predoctoral clinics of the 
Dental School exceed 60,000 annually. Through 
the Office of Clinical and Hospital Affairs, assis- 
tance is provided to students and patients who 
encounter difficulties. Central Materials Services, 
Central Records Systems, personnel and financial 
management associated with the operation of the 
teaching clinics are additional responsibilities co- 
ordinated through this office. 

Student and Employee Health 

The school provides medical care for its students 
through Student and Employee Health, located 



U • DENTAL SCHOOI 



on the first floor of the University of Maryland 
Professional Building, 419 West Redwood Street. 
Coverage is provided around-the-clock by family 
physicians and nurse practitioners. Gynecological 
services, including health maintenance, family 
planning and routine problems are provided. In- 
dividual and group counseling are provided at the 
Counseling Center, Suite 260 in the Professional 
Building. Some of the problems that students 
seek help with include: stress, relationships, drugs 
or alcohol, eating disorders and changes in school 
or home life. 

Students are seen by appointment or on an 
emergency basis by calling 706-6009. The cost of 
most care provided at Student and Employee 
Health is paid for through the student health fee. 
For a yearly fee, students are entitled to the ser- 
vices of Student and Employee Health, which is 
able to care for a large variety of students' health 
needs. Students' family members can also receive 
care at a reduced rate. 




Housing 

Baltimore is a fun, friendly city with many afford- 
able and convenient housing options. The 
brochure Living in Baltimore describes on- and off- 
campus options for UMAB students; it is avail- 
able through most UMAB admissions offices 
or by calling the Residence Life Office at (410) 
706-7766. 

On-campus living options include furnished 
university-owned apartments and dormitory style 
accommodations plus unfurnished apartments in 
a half-dozen privately owned loft district build- 
ings on campus. The Baltimore Student Union 
and Pascault Row Apartments are the two uni- 
versity-owned on-campus housing complexes. 



Many students choose to live in neighbor- 
hoods surrounding the UMAB campus. A wide 
range of rooms, apartments and home rentals are 
available throughout the metropolitan area. The 
Student Life Office, located in the Baltimore Stu- 
dent Union, keeps a listing of available rooms 
and apartments. 

On-campus parking is available to students. 
Commuting students must obtain a parking per- 
mit from the Parking Services Office, then pay 
the established daily rate when parking in the 
garage. Students who live in on-campus housing 
pay for parking by the semester or year and are 
guaranteed 24-hour parking in a garage adjacent 
to their residence facility. Public transportation 
makes the campus accessible by bus, subway and 
light rail. 

Athletic Facilities 

The Athletic Center at UMAB is located on the 
10th floor of the Pratt Street Garage. The facility 
is equipped with one squash court, two racquetball/ 
handball courts and two basketball courts which 
may also be used for volleyball. In addition, there 
is a weight room with two 15-station universal 
gyms, stationary bikes and rowing and stair ma- 
chines. Both men's and women's locker rooms are 
equipped with saunas and showers. 

Men's basketball, co-ed intramural basketball 
and volleyball teams compete throughout the fall 
and spring semesters. The Athletic Center also 
sponsors squash and racquetball tournaments and 
offers co-ed aerobic classes. UMAB students with 
a current and valid I.D. are admitted free. For ad- 
ditional information, contact the athletic man- 
ager at 706-3902. 



The Baltimore Student Union 

The Baltimore Student Union serves as a cultural 
and social center for students, faculty, staff, 
alumni and guests. Activities hosted by the union 
include meetings, dances, movies and special 
events. The multi-purpose Baltimore Student 
Union houses the campus offices of Student Fi- 
nancial Aid, Records and Registration, Student 
Affairs, USGA, Student Life, Residence Life and 
Off-Campus Housing. The Bookstore, Union 
Cafe, Computer Den, Credit Union, meeting and 
party rooms, lounge space and residence halls also 
are located in the union. 



STUDENT LIFE. 33 



STUDENT POLICIES 

Student Judicial Policy 

Statement of Ethical Principles, Practices, and 
Behaviors 

Listed below are examples of principles and be- 
haviors that the academic community of the 
Dental School, consisting of both faculty and 
students, considers generally valid. No such 
statement can ever be complete, nor can it be 
construed as a comprehensive code of profes- 
sional conduct. Rather, it is intended as a guide 
to live by for those who are a part of the academic 
community. 

• Each member of this community is obliged to 
carry out his or her designated responsibilities 
within the rules and governance structure 
adopted and agreed to by the community as a 
whole. 

• Faculty and students should be concerned with 
their own competence and strive to improve 
themselves in the integration and transmission 
of knowledge. 

• In contributing to the information base of the 
sciences, whether verbally or by written com- 
munication, students and faculty should pre- 
sent data, interpretations of data, and other 
facets of scholarly discovery with honesty and 
integrity. 

• Professional relations among all members of 
the community should be marked by civility. 
Thus, scholarly contributions should be ac- 
knowledged, slanderous comments and acts 
should be expunged, and each person should 
recognize and facilitate the contributions of 
others to this community. 

• Each member of the community, when acting 
as an evaluator of any other member, should 
recognize unprofessional personal bias and 
eliminate its effect on the evaluation. 

• The validity of evaluation shall not be com- 
promised by any departure from the published 
and/or generally understood rules of conduct. 
Thus, all manner of cheating on examinations 
or the presentation of work assumed to be 
one's own but done by another are unaccept- 
able behaviors. 

• An individual may challenge or refuse to com- 
ply with a directive whose implementation 
would not be in keeping with generally held 
ethical principles. 



• An individual should report his or her limita- 
tion of knowledge or experience if either limi- 
tation is likely to compromise an effort or ex- 
pected result. 

• Faculty and students should seek consultation 
whenever it appears that the quality of profes- 
sional service may be enhanced thereby. 

• Students should seek consultation and supervi- 
sion whenever their care of a patient may be 
compromised because of lack of knowledge 
and/or experience. 

• Students and faculty must merit the confi- 
dence of patients entrusted to their care, ren- 
dering to each a full measure of service and 
devotion. 

• All patients should be treated with dignity and 
respect. 

• An individual or group of individuals should 
not abuse their power by extending it beyond 
its defined or generally accepted limits. 

• To the extent practical, sanctions for viola- 
tions of these principles shall affect only indi- 
viduals found to have committed the viola- 
tions and shall not affect other persons. 




Professional Code of Conduct 

This academic community has interrelated re- 
sponsibilities of producing and disseminating new 
scientific knowledge, teaching, caring for pa- 
tients, and educating individuals to carry on 
these same functions. In carrying out these re- 
sponsibilities, the academic community needs 
rules to guide the maintenance of high standards. 
These must be nurtured by individuals with a de- 
veloped sense of honor, integrity, and intellectual 
honesty. It is incumbent upon the academic 



34 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



community to provide an environment which 
fosters these attributes in students and faculty 
members. 

It is important that faculty and students in a 
health profession realize that in our society the 
health practitioner functions mainly on the basis 
of self-discipline, rather than on imposed regula- 
tion, and receives a high degree of public confi- 
dence and trust. By accepting a Professional Code 
of Conduct, which represents this trust, the fac- 
ulty member and student demonstrate the desire 
to be fully prepared for the obligation to the den- 
tal profession and to the people served. As is tra- 
ditionally expected of all health professionals, 
faculty members and students will demonstrate 
the highest standards of integrity at all times. 
Faculty and students are expected at all times to 
conduct themselves in accordance with all codes, 
rules and regulations of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore. 

Student Offenses of the Professional Code of 
Conduct 

The following behaviors, while not all inclusive, 
are examples of student offenses of the Profes- 
sional Code of Conduct: 

• Unprofessional Conduct. Including, but not 
limited to, all forms of conduct which fail to 
meet the standards of the dental profession, 
lack of personal cleanliness, use of abusive lan- 
guage or behavior, disruption of class or any 
other school activity, and/or violation of the 
Dental School dress code. 

• Academic Misconduct. All forms of student 
academic misconduct including, but not lim- 
ited to, plagiarism, cheating on examinations, 
violation of examination procedures, and sub- 
mitting work for evaluation that is not one's 
own effort. 

• Dishonesty. Including knowingly furnishing 
false information through forgery, alteration or 
misuse of documents or records with intent to 
deceive; presenting written or oral statements 
known to be false; loaning, transferring, alter- 
ing or otherwise misusing university identifica- 
tion materials. 

• Theft or Destruction of Property. Including 
unauthorized possession or receiving of prop- 
erty that does not belong to the individual, 
such as instruments and books, or destruction 



of property not belonging to the individual. 

• Forcible entry into university facilities. 

• Intentional infliction or threat of bodily harm. 

• Possession of illegal drugs or weapons. 

• Aiding or Abetting. Including conspiring 
with or knowingly aiding or abetting another 
person to engage in any unacceptable activity. 

• Violation of any codes, rules, and regulations 
of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore. 

The sections of the Student Judicial Policy in- 
cluded in this bulletin are intended to provide ex- 
amples of the high standards of conduct expected 
of a professional and the offenses against these 
standards. The remaining sections of the policy 
describe specific examination procedures and pro- 
cedures for considering infractions against the 
Professional Code of Conduct. The Student Judi- 
cial Policy in its entirety is sent to each admitted 
student. Acceptance to the Dental School is con- 
tingent upon the understanding and acceptance 
of the tenets contained in the Student Judicial 
Policy and Professional Code of Conduct. 

Dress Regulations 

It is important to maintain a favorable and pro- 
fessional image of the Dental School as a profes- 
sional health care center. To that end, all levels 
of employees and students within the building are 
expected to dress and maintain a personal cleanli- 
ness that is consistent with a professional patient 
care oriented atmosphere. 

The following regulations apply to all employ- 
ees and students. These regulations apply in all 
areas of Hayden Harris Hall and all affiliated sites 
during the business days when clinics and classes 
are scheduled: 

• Men will wear, at a minimum, clean, neat 
slacks and a collared shirt. Women will wear 
clean and pressed attire appropriate for a pro- 
fessional environment. 

• In addition, in patient care areas and the Clin- 
ical Simulation Unit, men will wear ties and 
all will wear clinic attire approved by the 
Clinic Science Council. Informal attire such 
as denim jeans, athletic shoes or shoes without 
hose will not be worn. 

• Full-length laboratory coats are recommended 
for multidisciplinary laboratories and anatomy 
dissection laboratories. 









STUDENT LIFE • 35 




• Surgical scrub shirts are to be worn only for 
the performance of specialty surgery. 

• Steps will be taken to control body odor and 
unpleasant breath at all times. Fingernails 
should be properly trimmed and clean. Hair 
styles should not interfere with the delivery of 
patient care. 

The primary responsibility for complying with 
and enforcing these regulations rests with the in- 
dividual. Individuals in violation of these regula- 
tions will be dismissed from the laboratory, clini- 
cal area and/or lecture room by the supervisor 
until these regulations have been met. Depart- 
ment chairmen will ensure that these guidelines 
are complied with and enforced. 

A written incident report describing the na- 
ture of the violation will be forwarded to, and 
filed in the Office of the Senior Associate Dean, 
with a copy to the individual within one working 
day following the infraction. Subsequent viola- 
tions of these regulations by a given individual 
will be forwarded by the senior associate dean to 
the appropriate body for action. 

PUBLICATIONS/ORGANIZATIONS/ 
AWARDS 

Publications 

Dental School and campus publications include 
the semi-annual Forum, a magazine focusing on 
new developments and techniques in the practice 
of dentistry and on the school's educational and 
research programs; the VOICE, published bi- 
monthly; and the annual UMAB Student Answer 
Book. In addition, the Office of Academic and 
Student Affairs publishes a Dental Student Hand- 
book for distribution to incoming dental students. 
These publications are distributed free of charge. 

Student publications include a yearbook, The 
MIRROR, published annually by student editors 
and staff; and a student newspaper, The Maryland 
Probe, published quarterly. Each year the Student 
Dental Association compiles and distributes a 
student directory. 

Organizations 

The Student Dental Association (SDA) is the 
organizational structure of the student body. The 
association is presided over and governed by 



elected representatives from all classes and is rep- 
resented on selected committees of the Faculty 
Council. The organization participates in certain 
student-faculty activities and sponsors and directs 
all student social activities. It is responsible for 
the publication of the school's yearbook, The 
MIRROR, and student newspaper, The Maryland 
Probe, and is unique among dental student orga- 
nizations in having formulated its own constitu- 
tion and professional code of ethics. 

The American Student Dental Association 
(ASDA) was established in February 1971, with 
the aid of the American Dental Association 
(ADA). Its primary purposes are to secure schol- 
arships and loans and to assist in other student- 
related affairs. Included in the ASDA member- 
ship is a subscription to the ADA Journal. 

Student American Dental Hygienists' Asso- 
ciation (SADHA) members are involved in ac- 
tivities such as hosting guest speakers, conducting 
fundraising projects, presenting table clinics and 
maintaining liaison with the state and local 
organizations. They also participate in meetings 
and discussion groups on a regional and national 
level. Student representatives attend the an- 
nual meeting of the American Dental Hygienists' 
Association. 

The Student National Dental Association 
(SNDA), Maryland chapter, was founded in 
1973. The primary objective of this organization 
is to foster the admission, development and grad- 
uation of black dental and dental hygiene stu- 
dents. Among the activities in which the Mary- 
land chapter is engaged are minority recruitment, 
tutoring, social and professional programs, and 
community and university relations. 

The American Association of Dental Re- 
search/Student Research Group was founded in 
1987. The objectives of the local chapter are to 
promote student research in dentistry and its 
related disciplines, to promote the advancement 
of dental research and related aspects, and to fur- 
ther the aims and objectives of the American 
Association of Dental Research (AADR) and 
International Association of Dental Research 
(I ADR) as they relate to student research. Mem- 
bership is open to all dental and dental hygiene 
students expressing an interest in dental research. 
Past research experience is not a requirement (or 
membership. 



36 .DENTAL SCHOOL 



The American Association of Dental Schools 
(AADS) promotes the advancement of dental 
education, research and service in all appropri- 
ately accredited institutions that offer programs 
for dental personnel. The association has three 
membership categories: institutional, individual 
and student. Student members receive the Jour- 
nal of Dental Education and the Dental Student 
News, published by the association. During the 
year the local chapter conducts programs to pro- 
mote the goals of this organization. Three Dental 
School student representatives (two dental and 
one dental hygiene) are elected to serve on the 
Council of Students of the American Association 
of Dental Schools. 




The Gamma Pi Delta Prosthodontic Hon- 
orary Society, chartered in 1965, is an honorary 
student dental organization with scholarship and 
interest in the field of prosthetic dentistry as a ba- 
sis for admission. The objective of the organiza- 
tion is the advancement of prosthetic dentistry 
through lectures, table clinics and other academic 
activities which will stimulate the creative inter- 
est of students and the profession in general. 

The Gorgas Odontological Honorary Society 
was organized in 1916 as an honorary student 
dental society with scholarship as a basis for ad- 
mission. The society was named after Dr. Ferdi- 
nand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, 
a teacher of many years' experience and a major 
contributor to dental literature. It was with the 
idea of perpetuating his name that the society 
chose its title. 

To be eligible for membership a student must 
rank in the top one-third of his class, must have 



achieved and maintained a minimum grade point 
average of 3.00 in all combined courses and must 
not have repeated for scholastic reasons any sub- 
ject. Speakers prominent in the dental and med- 
ical fields are invited to address members at 
monthly meetings. An effort is made to obtain 
speakers not affiliated with the university. 

The Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, 
national honorary dental society, was chartered at 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery during 
the 1928-29 academic year. Students whose rank 
for the entire course of study is among the highest 
20 percent of the class are eligible. This high 
honor is conferred upon those seniors who, in ad- 
dition to scholarship, have demonstrated exem- 
plary character traits and potential for future pro- 
fessional growth and attainment. 

The Academy of General Dentistry member- 
ship is open to all students in the Dental School. 
General dentists share extraordinary experiences 
in lecture-discussion programs of interest to all. 
Meetings are held several times a year after 
school hours. 

The American Association of Women Den- 
tists was founded nationally in 1921. The Mary- 
land student chapter, founded in 1982, provides 
support and information locally to women den- 
tal students attending the Dental School. Lec- 
tures, group discussions, projects and gatherings 
with practitioners and AAWD chapters from 
other dental schools form the basis of the group's 
activities. 

The American Society of Dentistry for Chil- 
dren meets once a month and uses a lecture- 
discussion format to discuss subjects as varied as 
nutrition for children to nitrous oxide analgesia 
in private practice. All students are welcome to 
join. 

The Big Brother/Sister Program is a volun- 
tary effort on the part of each member of the 
sophomore class to help and advise a member of 
the incoming freshman class. It is hoped that this 
assistance will continue through graduation of 
each class. The program has been made an official 
standing committee of the SDA. 

The Dental Hygiene Big Brother/Sister Pro- 
gram is a voluntary effort on the part of each 
member of the senior class to help and advise a 
member of the junior class. It is hoped that this 
assistance will continue through graduation of 
each class. 



STUDENT LIFE. 37 




Students Supporting Students is a group of 
students available to help other students having 
difficulty coping with dental school. These stu- 
dents have taken an interest in learning how to 
help others with various types of problems fre- 
quently experienced by dental and dental hygiene 
students. This group can provide peer support, re- 
ferral, guided assistance and information related 
to student problems. 

The Christian Dental Association, a chapter 
of the Christian Medical Society, provides stu- 
dents with opportunities in the areas of commu- 
nity and world outreach programs. In addition to 
holding Bible study sessions and lectures, the 
group is forming a network between practicing 
Christian dentists and dental students. 

Professional dental fraternities are Greek letter 
organizations of men and women bonded to- 
gether by ritual. They are specialized fraternities 
which limit membership to selected graduates 
and students enrolled and satisfactorily pursuing 
courses in an accredited college of dentistry. They 
are not honorary fraternities or recognition soci- 
eties which confer membership to recognize out- 
standing scholarship. Their aims are to promote 
the high ideals and standards of the profession, 
advance professional knowledge and welfare of 
members, and provide a medium through which 
members, with a common interest, can develop 
everlasting friendships. Representative chapters 
in the Dental School are Alpha Omega, founded 
in 1907; Psi Omega, founded in 1892; and Nu 
Zeta Pi, founded in 1990. 



Awards 

Awards are presented to senior students at gradu- 
ation to recognize the following achievements 
and qualities: 
Dentistry 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the ten highest in 
the class 

• highest average in basic biologic sciences 

• highest average in preclinical studies 

• ethical standards, kindness and humanitarian- 
ism 

• professional demeanor 

• devotion to the school and the profession 

• characteristics of an outstanding general prac- 
titioner 



• the most professional growth and development 

• conscientious and enthusiastic devotion to 
clinical practice 

• high proficiency in clinical care and patient 
management 

• greatest proficiency in oral and maxillofacial 
surgery 

• excellence in fixed partial prosthesis 

• excellence in complete oral operative restora- 
tion 

• excellence in practical set of full upper and 
lower dentures 

• outstanding senior thesis/table clinic 

• research achievement 

• achievement, proficiency and/or potential in 
each of the following disciplines or specialty 
areas: 

anatomy 
anesthesiology 
basic dental science 
dental materials 
dentistry for children 
dentistry for the handicapped 
dental radiology 
endodontics 
geriatric dentistry 
gold foil operation 
operative dentistry 
oral health care delivery 
oral medicine 
oral pathology 

oral and maxillofacial surgery 
orthodontics 
periodontology 
removable prosthodontics 
Dental Hygiene 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the five highest in 
the class 

• humanitarianism, ethical standards and devo- 
tion to the profession 

• interest in and potential for active participa- 
tion in professional organizations 

• interest and participation in the Student 
American Dental Hygienists' Association 

• outstanding clinical performance 

• outstanding leadership and participation in 
community activities and student and profes- 
sional organizations 



w.DKNTAL SCHOOL 



Matriculation Policies and Procedures 



REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

To attend classes students are required to register 
each term in accordance with current registration 
procedures. Fees are due and payable on the dates 
specified for registration. Registration is not com- 
pleted until all financial obligations are satisfied. 
Students who do not complete their registration 
and pay tuition and all fees will not be permitted 
to attend classes. A fee will be charged for late 
registration. 

Although the university regularly mails bills to 
advance-registered students, it cannot assume re- 
sponsibility for their receipt. If any student does 
not receive a bill prior to the beginning of a se- 
mester in which he/she has advance registered, it 
is the student's responsibility to contact the regis- 
trar's office or cashier's office during normal busi- 
ness hours. 

All checks and money orders should be made 
payable to the University of Maryland for the ex- 
act amount of the actual bill. 

No diploma, certificate or transcript of record 
will be issued to a student who has not made sat- 
isfactory settlement of his university account. 

DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE STATUS 

An initial determination of in-state status for ad- 
mission, tuition and charge-differential purposes 
will be made by the university at the time a stu- 
dent's application for admission is under consid- 
eration. The determination made at that time, 
and any determination made thereafter, shall pre- 
vail in each semester until the determination is 
successfully challenged. 

Students classified as in-state for admission, 
tuition and charge-differential purposes are re- 
sponsible for notifying the Office of Records and 
Registration, in writing, within 15 days of any 
change in their circumstances which might in 
any way affect their classification at UMAB. 

The determination of in-state status for admis- 
sion, tuition and charge-differential purposes is 
the responsibility of the campus Office of Records 
and Registration. A student may request a re- 
evaluation of this status by filing a petition 
(available in Room 326 of the Baltimore Student 
Union). Copies of the university's policy are 



available in the admissions office and in the 
dean's office. 

1992-93 TUITION AND FEES 

Dental Program 

Per Per 

Semester Year 

Matriculation (new students)* $ 40 $ 40 
Tuition (fixed charges) 

In-state 

Out-of-state 
Instructional resources fee 
Academic service fee 
Student activities fee 
Student health fee 
Hepatitis vaccine series* 
Hospitalization insurance** 

One person 

Two persons 

Family 
Supporting facilities fee 
Laundry service charge 
Instrument cassette 

service charge 
Laboratory fee 

Year I 

Year II 
Instrument supply purchase 

Year I 

Year II 

Year III 
Breakage fee* (refundable) 
Disability insurance 
Student liability insurance 

Years I, II 

Years III, IV 
Dormitory fee 

(double occupancy) 
Student Government 

Association fee 5 10 

Graduation fee (seniors)* 35 35 

*One~timefee. 
**The university's program or equivalent insurance cover- 
age is required of all dental students in addition to the 

student health fee. 



4,137 


8,274 


9,489 


18,979 


44 


88 


5 


10 


22 


44 


33 


67 


140 


140 


370 


740 


774 


1,548 


964 


1,928 


97 


194 


100 


200 



875 1,750 



200 


400 


265 


530 


,100 


2,200 


600 


1,200 


125 


250 


200 


200 


60 


60 


75 


75 


150 


150 



1,290 2,580 



P 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES. 39 



Dental Hygiene Program 



Per 
Semester 



Per 
Year 



Matriculation (new students)* $ 40 $ 40 
Tuition (fixed charges)** 

In-state 1,052 2,104 

Out-of-state 3,502 7,004 

Instructional resources fee 44 88 

Student activities fee 22 44 

Student health fee 34 68 

Hepatitis vaccine series* 140 140 
Hospitalization insurance*** 

One person 371 742 

Two persons 775 1,550 

Family 964 1,928 

Supporting facilities fee 97 194 

Laundry service charge 100 200 

Instrument cassette 

service charge 400 800 

Laboratory fee* 43 86 

Instrument supply purchase* 200 200 

Breakage fee* (refundable) 100 100 

Disability insurance 60 60 

Student liability insurance 50 50 
Dormitory fee (double 

occupancy) 1,290 2,580 
Student Government 

Association fee 5 10 
Graduation fee (seniors)* 35 35 
*One-time fee . 
**Tuition figures are based on full-time attendance. Tu- 
ition for part-time students (8 credits or less) is $123 
per credit hour for both in- and out-of-state students . 
***The university's program or equivalent insurance cover- 
age is required of all full-time dental hygiene students in 
addition to the student health fee. 

Explanation of Fees 

The application and/or matriculation fee par- 
tially defrays the cost of processing applications 
for admission and enrollment data in the profes- 
sional schools. These are not refundable. The ap- 
plication fee will be applied against the matricu- 
lation fee for accepted students. 

The instructional resources fee is charged to 
provide supplies, materials, equipment and to 
defray other costs directly associated with the in- 
structional program. 

The student activities fee is used to meet the 
costs for various student activities, student publi- 



cations and cultural programs. In each of the 
schools that has a student activities fee, the Stu- 
dent Government Association, in cooperation 
with the dean's office of the school, recommends 
expenditure of the fee collected. 




The student health fee is charged to help de- 
fray the cost of providing a campus health service. 
This service includes routine examinations and 
emergency care. Acceptable medical insurance is 
required in addition to the student health fee. 

Hospitalization insurance is required of all 
full-time students. A brief outline of the student 
hospitalization insurance program is furnished 
each student. Students with equivalent insurance 
coverage must provide proof of such coverage at 
the time of registration and obtain a hospitaliza- 
tion insurance waiver each fall semester. 

The supporting facilities fee is used for expan- 
sion of various campus facilities that are not 
funded or are funded only in part from other 
sources. 

Student liability (malpractice) insurance fee 
is charged all professional school students. 

The graduation fee is charged to help defray 
costs involved with graduation and commencement. 

Fees for auditors are the same as those charged 
for courses taken for credit at both the predoc- 
toral and graduate level. Audited credit hours will 
be added to a student's total credit enrollment to 
determine whether or not a student is full-time or 
part-time for tuition and fee assessment purposes. 

Special students are assessed tuition and fees 
in accordance with the schedule for the compara- 
ble predoctoral, graduate or first professional 
classification. 



40 . DENTAL SCHOOL 



• A service charge is assessed for dishonored 
checks and is payable for each check which is 
returned unpaid by the drawee bank on initial 
presentation because of insufficient funds, pay- 
ment stopped, postdating or drawn against un- 
collected items. 

For checks up to $50 $ 5 

For checks from $50.01 to $100 $10 

For checks over $100 $20 

• A late registration fee is charged to defray the 
cost of the special handling involved for those 
who do not complete their registration on the 
prescribed days. 

• The university reserves the right to make such 
changes in fees and other charges as may be 
necessary. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 

Students who want to leave the school at any 
time during the academic year are required to file 
with the dean a letter of resignation. In addition, 
an application for withdrawal form bearing the 
proper signatures must be filed with the registrar's 
office. The student must have no outstanding 
obligations to the school and must return the stu- 
dent identification card. 

If the above procedures are not completed, the 
student will not be entitled to honorable dis- 
missal and will forfeit the right to any refunds 
which would otherwise be given. The date used 
in computing refunds is the date on which the ap- 
plication for withdrawal is filed in the registrar's 
office. 

Students officially withdrawing from the 
school will be credited for all academic fees 
charged to them less the matriculation fee, in ac- 
cordance with the following schedule for the date 
instruction begins: 

Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 



STUDENT EXPENSES 

A reasonable estimation of expenses for the 1992- 
93 academic year for in-state students living away 
from home is $15,000; for out-of-state students, 
$28,000. These figures include tuition, fees, food, 
lodging and personal expenses excluding travel. 
To these expenses must be added the costs of in- 
struments, supplies and books. 

Instruments and Supplies 

Instruments and equipment are provided through 
the Central Materials Services. A complete list of 
essential instruments and materials for all courses 
is compiled by the Central Materials Services 
Advisory Committee. The costs are listed on 
pages 39-40 under Tuition and Fees. Half of the 
total cost of Central Materials Services is billed 
each semester with tuition and must be paid at 
the time of registration. 



Textbooks 

A list of textbooks recommended for first-year 
courses is mailed to incoming students during the 
summer prior to enrollment. Textbook lists for 
second-, third- and fourth-year courses are circu- 
lated at the beginning of the academic year. The 
campus bookstore stocks these books; students 
may purchase books there or at other local book- 
stores. Approximate costs of textbooks and other 
instructional materials are as follows: 

First year $500 

Second year 475 

Third year 250 

Fourth year 50 



Student Professional Liability Insurance 

Dental and dental hygiene students in each year 
of the program are required to purchase profes- 
sional liability insurance as a condition for enroll- 
ment. This policy also applies to all advanced 
dental education students. Predoctoral dental and 
dental hygiene students obtain insurance cover- 
age through a group program for a reasonable pre- 
mium of from $75-$ 150 per year. Information re- 
garding professional coverage for students is 
available through the Dental School's Office of 
Clinical and Hospital Affairs. 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES. 41 



OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY RECORDS 

Transcript of Record 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of 
their UMAB record from the registrar's office. 
There is no charge for this service. A request for 
transcripts must be made in writing and should be 
made at least five days in advance of the date 
when the records are actually needed. Transcripts 
are issued in turn as requests are received. No 
transcript will be furnished to any student or 
alumnus whose financial obligations to the uni- 
versity have not been satisfied. 




proof of equivalent coverage. If proof of compara- 
ble insurance is not received at Student and Em- 
ployee Health by September 15, the student will 
be required to pay for the student policy for that 
semester. 

Students are required to document their im- 
munity to childhood diseases, including measles, 
mumps, rubella and chicken pox. Information re- 
garding specific requirements will be distributed 
to each student. Since hepatitis "B" is an occupa- 
tional risk for health care providers, all enrolling 
dental students are also required to undergo im- 
munization against hepatitis "B." Vaccine cost is 
included in the student fees. 



Diploma Application 

Degree requirements vary according to the 
UMAB school or program in which a student is 
registered. However, each degree candidate must 
file a formal application for diploma with the reg- 
istrar's office at the beginning of the term in 
which the student expects to graduate. This must 
be done by the end of the third week of the se- 
mester or the second week of the summer session. 
A student who does not graduate on the origi- 
nally expected date must reapply for graduation 
by the appropriate deadline. 

STUDENT HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

All students are required to have the campus- 
sponsored student health and hospitalization in- 
surance or its equivalent. Detailed information 
regarding the provisions of the excellent student 
policy the campus offers may be obtained from 
Student and Employee Health. At the time of 
registration each year, students must either pur- 
chase the student coverage or produce certified 



42 • D E N T A L SCHOOL 



Financial Aid 



Aid programs are centrally administered by Stu- 
dent Financial Aid, located in the Baltimore Stu- 
dent Union. The purpose of the program is to 
help students who otherwise would be financially 
unable to attend the university. To qualify for 
aid, the student must apply annually and meet 
certain eligibility requirements. Since grants are 
limited, students should apply in January for the 
following academic year. 

Aid packages often include a combination of 
loans, grants, scholarships and work-study de- 
signed to meet 100 percent of a student's needs. 
The student should call Student Financial Aid 
(410-706-7347) or stop by for fact sheets that 
contain detailed information on the application 
process and types of aid available. The office is 
open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 

UNIVERSITY GRANTS 

In an attempt to meet the ever-increasing needs 
of students, the Maryland legislature each year al- 
locates to the university funds earmarked for stu- 
dent assistance. As a result, university grants are 
available to Maryland residents who demonstrate 
a financial need. After careful review of the stu- 
dent's current financial situation, awards are 
made on an individual basis in the form of Dean's 
Scholarships, Desegregation Grants, Other Race 
Grants, and Tuition Waivers. 

ENDOWMENT AND LOAN FUNDS 

American Dental Hygienists* Association 
Scholarship and Loan Program. The American 
Dental Hygienists' Association administers two 
scholarship programs: the Certificate Scholarship 
Program for students entering the final year of a 
dental hygiene curriculum and the Post Dental 
Hygiene Scholarship Program for certificate den- 
tal hygienists who will be enrolled in a program 
leading to a baccalaureate degree. Dental hygiene 
■ students who will be enrolled or accepted for full- 
: time enrollment may also be considered for 
American Dental Hygienists' Association Loans 
which range from $500 to $1,000 annually. Re- 
| payment begins 10 months after graduation with 
7.5 percent interest on the amount of the loan 
outstanding. For further information about these 



scholarships, write directly to the American Den- 
tal Hygienists' Association, 211 East Chicago 
Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. In addition, 
local chapters of the ADHA may offer scholar- 
ships and/or loans. For information, contact the 
SADHA advisor on the dental hygiene faculty. 

John Carr Emergency Loan Fund. This en- 
dowed emergency student loan fund was estab- 
lished in memory of Dr. John Carr, a dedicated 
member of the Dental School faculty, and is 
available to dental and dental hygiene students 
who have an emergency need during their school 
years. Repayment of the loan is not scheduled un- 
til after graduation. 

The Dr. Gene W. Eng Scholarship Fund. 
This scholarship, which was established to honor 
Dr. Gene W. Eng, Class of 1963, provides funds 
to deserving first year dental students for payment 
of tuition and fees. The criteria for selection shall 
not be dependent on high academic achieve- 
ment, but shall be based on financial need and 
evidence of potential for success in the Dental 
School and in the profession of dentistry. 

All final candidates will be required to submit 
an essay describing their personal and profes- 
sional reasons for applying for this scholarship. 
Students selected as entering freshmen shall be 
eligible for the scholarship each year while en- 
rolled and in good academic standing in the Den- 
tal School. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endow- 
ment Loan Fund. Under a provision of the will 
of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord of New Haven, 
Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 
was bequeathed to the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery, Dental School, University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore to aid worthy students in secur- 
ing a dental education. 

The Russell Gigliotti Memorial Student 
Loan Fund. This fund is intended to provide fi- 
nancial assistance primarily but not exclusively to 
students in the preclinical years, for which costs 
are significantly higher because of required instru- 
ment and material purchases. Any predoctoral 
dental student who qualifies for financial aid, and 
who is unable to secure other university financial 
assistance, is eligible to apply. 

A maximum of $500 annually will be loaned 
to one student; no student may receive more than 
two loans during the period of training. Simple 
interest at the rate of 5 percent per annum will be 




FINANCIAL A I [i • 4? 



charged, commencing three months after gradua- 
tion. Principal plus interest must be repaid within 
27 months following graduation. The fund was 
established in 1977 in memory of Dr. Russell 
Gigliotti, an alumnus and dedicated member of 
the faculty for more than 30 years. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund. This fund 
was established in 1954 by the New Jersey 
Alumni Association in memory of Dr. Albert A. 
Harrington, a member of the class of 1910. The 
fund is a source of valuable help in aiding stu- 
dents to solve temporary financial problems. 

Lawrence A. Haskins Memorial Student 
Loan Fund. This fund, honoring the memory of 
Dr. Haskins, class of 1970, provides loans to de- 
serving students in the Dental School. Loans 
made from the fund shall bear 7 percent interest 
per annum to accrue with the start of the repay- 
ment period which shall last no longer than 10 
years. The repayment period shall begin one year 
after the completion of studies. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation. During 
World War II the foundation granted to this 
school a fund to provide rotating loans to deserv- 
ing dental students. 

The Wilson B. Lau Memorial Student Loan 
Fund. Established by his wife to honor the mem- 
ory of Wilson B. Lau, this revolving student loan 
fund provides loans to deserving students in the 
Dental School. Loans made from the fund shall 
bear 7 percent interest per annum to accrue with 
the start of the repayment period which shall 
last no longer than 10 years. The repayment pe- 
riod shall begin one year after the completion of 
studies. 

The Sol B. Love Memorial Student Loan 
Fund. This revolving student loan fund was es- 
tablished by his family to honor the memory of 
Dr. Sol B. Love, a member of the class of 1961. 
Loans made from the fund to deserving students 
in the Dental School shall bear 7 percent interest 
per annum to accrue with the start of the repay- 
ment period which shall last no longer than 10 
years. The repayment period shall begin one year 
after the completion of studies. 

Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association. 
The Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association ad- 
ministers a loan program for qualified senior den- 
tal hygiene students. Information is distributed to 
junior students by the Department of Dental Hy- 
giene during the spring semester. 



The Dr. Joseph Anthony Pennino Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Under the provision of the 
will of the late Elizabeth Pennino, this endowed 
scholarship fund was established as a memorial to 
Dr. Joseph Anthony Pennino, class of 1928, to 
provide scholarships to deserving students in the 
D.D.S. program of the Dental School. 

The Ronald M. Starr Family Student Loan 
Fund. This endowed student loan fund was estab- 
lished to honor the family of Dr. Ronald M. Starr, 
class of 1958, by providing loans to pay tuition 
and fees to deserving junior and senior dental and 
dental hygiene students. The students must have 
demonstrated financial need and the potential for 
success in the Dental School and the profession 
of dentistry. Repayment of the loan begins three 
years after completion of studies in the Dental 
School. Loans made from the fund shall bear no 
interest until graduation or until the student 
ceases to be enrolled. 

The Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship. The De- 
partment of Dental Hygiene awards the Patricia 
C. Stearns Scholarship to a student entering the 
senior year who has demonstrated academic ex- 
cellence; willingness to serve the class, school and 
community; dedication to the profession; and 
high standards of professional conduct. 

The Student Dental Association-Alumni 
Fund. This fund, created in 1960, was established 
for the purpose of aiding any student who may be 
in need of an emergency loan. 

The following government, bank and private 
lender loans also are available to students on the 
basis of need: Health Professions Student Loan, 
Perkins Loan, Guaranteed Student Loan, Health 
Education Assistance Loan and Supplemental 
Loans. All requirements, interest rates and terms 
for these loans can be found in the Office of Stu- 
dent Financial Aid brochure. 



44 • DENTAL SCHiuu 



Administration and Faculty 



DENTAL SCHOOL 

Administrative Officers 

Dean 

Richard R. Ranney, D.D.S., University of Iowa, 

1963; M.S., University of Rochester, 1969. 

Senior Associate Dean 

Warren M. Morganstein, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs 
Mark L. Wagner, A.B., Birmingham Southern 
College, 1959; D.M.D., University of Alabama, 
1963. 

Associate Dean for Clinical and Hospital Affairs 
John F. Hasler, B.S., Indiana University, 1958; 
D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

Director of Admissions and Recruitment 
James R. Swancar, B.A., Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1952; D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 1963. 

Acting Director, Center for Professional Development 
Allan H. Dana, B.A., University of Miami, 1959; 
M.B.A., 1961. 



Faculty Emeriti 

JohnJ.Salley, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Dean Emeritus 

Irving I. Abramson, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Frank A. Dolle, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M., D.Sc. 

Professor Emeritus 

Frank C. Jerbi, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

John P. Lambooy, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Robert J. Leupold, D.M.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Martin Lunin, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 



Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Charles T. Pridgeon, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Wilbur O. Ramsey, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Frieda G. Rudo, Ph.D. 

Professor Emerita 

Donald E. Shay, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

John I. White, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Riley S. Williamson, Jr., D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Marvin M. Graham, D.D.S. 

Clinical Professor Emeritus 



Faculty 

Abrams, Ronald G., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, 
B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1958; D.M.D., 
Tufts University, 1962; M.S., 1966. 

Ackerman, Ronald I., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pe- 
diatric Dentistry, D.D.S., Howard University, 1976. 

Agarwal, Sudha, Research Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.Sc, Agra University, India, 1966; 
M.Sc, 1968; Ph.D., Northeastern University, 1973. 

Ailor, John E., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of 
Tennessee, 1964- 

Allen, Karen L., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., College of Notre Dame, 1982; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 

Apicella, Albert, Clinical Assistant Professor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 
1984; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1988. 

Arceo, Nilda, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S.A., Jose Marti Preuniversity Institute of Ha- 
vana, 1977; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 

Archibald, David, Associate Professor, Oral Pathology, 
B.S., Tufts University, 1975; D.M.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1979; D.Sc, 1986. 

Arita, Charles, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, B.A., 
D.D.S., University of California at San Francisco, 
1988. 

Ashman, Steven G., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1966; D.D.S., 1970. 

Baer, Marvin L., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Texas, 
1960; M.S., Ohio State University, 1967. 




ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY. 45 



Bailey, Jeffrey C, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1980; D.D.S., 
Medical College of Virginia, 1990. 

Balciunas, Birute A., Assistant Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Notre Dame 
College, 1970; D.D.S., Case Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1975; M.S.D., Indiana University, 1979. 

Balis, Sophia, Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Athens (Greece), 
1957; D.D.S., University of Toronto (Canada), 
1966. 

Ball, Marion J., Research Professor, Educational and 
Instructional Resources, Division of Dental Infor- 
matics, B.A., University of Kentucky, 1961; M.A., 
1965; Ed.D., Temple University, 1978. 




Barata, Mary Catherine, Assistant Professor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., West Virginia University, 1983; 
M.S., University of Missouri-Kansas City, 1985. 

Barnes, Christine, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Barnes, Douglas M., Assistant Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1979; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Bashirelahi, Nasir, Associate Professor, Biochemistry, 
B.S., Tehran University (Iran), 1960; Pharm. D., 
1962; M.S., University of Louisville, 1965; Ph.D., 
1968. 

Bauman, Gary H., Dental School Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Brooklyn College, 
1981; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1985. 

Beach, Daryl R., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Oregon State Univer- 
sity, 1947; D.M.D., University of Oregon, 1951. 

Beckerman, Todd, Associate Professor, Oral Pathol- 
ogy, B.A., Emory University, 1959; D.D.S., Colum- 
hia University, 1963; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1987. 

Belenky, Michael M., Associate Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., Virginia Military Institute, 



1955; D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1961; 
M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Benevento, Louis, Professor, Anatomy, B.S., Rensse- 
laer Polytechnic Institute, 1962; M.S., 1964; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1967. 

Bennett, Robert B., Assistant Professor, Physiology, 
B.A., Carleton College, 1960; M.S., University of 
Nebraska, 1963; Ph.D., 1967. 

Bergman, Stewart A., Professor, Oral and Maxillofa- 
cial Surgery, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1964; D.D.S., 
State University of New York, 1968; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1986. 

Bergquist, John J., Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Iowa, 1954; M.S., 1970. 

Blank, Lawrence W., Associate Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S.D., University of California, 
1968; D.D.S., 1968; M.S., George Washington Uni- 
versity, 1974; M.S., University of Michigan, 1978. 

Blum, Damian D., Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.A., University of Maryland, 1979; 
D.M.D., Boston University, 1983. 

Boughman, JoAnn, P-esearch Professor, Periodontics, 
B.S., Indiana University, 1972; Ph.D., 1978. 

Bowen, William J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; M.S., 
1959; D.D.S., 1962. 

Bowers, Gerald M., Professor, Periodontics, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1950; D.D.S., 1954; M.S., 
Ohio State University, 1962. 

Bowers, Jane E., Research Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., 
Towson State University, 1987. 

Bowersox, Barbara, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1987. 

Bowman, John M., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1972; D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1976. 

Bradbury, John R., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Ohio State University, 
1969; D.D.S., 1972. 

Branoff, Ronald S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Or- 
thodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966; 
M.S.D., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1970. 

Brooks, John, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1974; D.D.S., 1979. 

Brown, D. Michael, Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., 
St. Johns College, 1951; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1961. 

Buchness, George F., Associate Professor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S., Cath- 
olic University of America, 1954; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1961. 



4(i • I ) E N T A L SCHOOL 






Bullock, Jr., Nathaniel, Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Frostburg State Univer- 
sity, 1984; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1989. 

Buxbaum, Jerome D., Clinical Professor, Physiology, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; D.D.S., 1955. 

Callery, Patrick, Associate Professor, Biochemistry, 
B.S., University of Utah, 1968; Ph.D., University of 
California, 1974. 

Caplan, Carl, Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1959; D.D.S., 1963; M.B.A., Loyola College, 1981. 

Cappuccio, Joseph P., Professor Emeritus, Special As- 
sistant to the Dean for Alumni Affairs, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island, 1943; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1946. 

Capra, Norman, Associate Professor, Physiology, B.S., 
Birmingham Southern College, 1969; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Alabama, 1975; Ph.D., 1976. 

Caputo, Traci, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., Villanova University, 1986; D.M.D., 
Medical University of South Carolina, 1990. 

Carr, Sandra J., Dental School Assistant Professor, 
Dental Hygiene, A.A., Southern Illinois University, 
1964; B.A., Eastern Illinois University, 1974; 
M.Ed., Washington University, 1977. 

Castillo, Enrique F., Instructor, Anatomy, B.S., Cole- 
gio Saleciano "Don Bosco;" M.D., School of Medi- 
cine of the Polytechnical Institute, 1974; M.S., In- 
vestigative Center for Advanced Studies of the 
Polytechnical Institute, 1981. 

Chang, Yung-Feng, Professor, Biochemistry, B.S., Na- 
tional Taiwan University, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

Chaudhari, Anshumali, Adjunct Associate Professor, 
Physiology; B.S., University of Lucknow, India, 
1966; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 1976. 

Chester, Robert, Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1992. 

Christopher, Andrew, Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Manhattan Col- 
lege, 1943; D.D.S., Marquette University, 1947; 
M.H.A., Baylor University, 1967. 

Chu, Khanh P., Clinical Assistant Professor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.A., University of Maryland, 1982; 
D.D.S., 1986. 

Chu, Ngoc Q., Clinical Assistant Professor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.A., University of Maryland, 1984; 
D.D.S., 1988. 

Cohen, Larry, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Cohen, Leonard A., Professor, Oral Health Care De- 
livery, B.A., George Washington University, 1967; 
D.D.S., Howard University, 1971; M.P.H., Harvard 
School of Public Health, 1974; M.S., 1976. 

Cohen, Stanley, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 



Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1980; 
D.D.S., 1985. 

Colangelo, Gary A., Assistant Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1965; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1970. 

Coll, James A., Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1969; 
D.M.D., 1969; M.S., University of Oregon, 1974. 

Conway, Michael, Dental School Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Indi- 
ana, 1960; M.S., University of Missouri, 1968. 

Costello, Leslie C, Professor, Physiology, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

Courtade, Simon A., Assistant Professor, Biochem- 
istry, B.A., Wesleyan University, 1949; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1952; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester, 1965. 

Crafton, B. Casey, Clinical Assistant Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, B.A., West Virginia University, 
1983; D.D.S., 1987. 

Craig, James F., Professor, Educational and Instruc- 
tional Resources, B.S., Western Illinois University, 
1968; M.S., Indiana University, 1970, Ed.D., 1972. 

Creamer, Timothy J., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., State Univer- 
sity of New York at Albany, 1972; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Texas, 1978. 

Criado-Hedreen, Zully, Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Loyola College of 
Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1987. 

Crooks, Edwin L., Assistant Professor, Dentistry/Gen- 
eral Practice Residency, B.S., Randolph Macon 
College, 1967; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 
1973. 

Crossley, Harold L., Associate Professor, Pharmacol- 
ogy, B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1964; M.S., 
1970; Ph.D., 1972; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1980. 

Curley, Diane, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
West Chester University, 1976; M.S., Temple Uni- 
versity, 1982. 

Dailey, Jacqueline, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, A. A., Community Col- 
lege of Baltimore, 1981; A.A., 1988. 

Dana, Allan H., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of Miami, 
1959; M.B.A., 1961. 

Davidson, William M., Professor, Orthodontics, A.B., 
Dartmouth College, 1960; D.M.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1965; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 
1969. 

Davliakos, John P., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1980; D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1984. 




ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY. 47 




Delisle, Allan L., Associate Professor, Microbiology, 
B.S., University of California, 1960; M.S., 1961; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1968. 

Demas, Donald C, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S.D., University of Illinois, 1983; D.D.S., 1985. 

DePaola, Louis G., Associate Professor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1971; D.D.S., 1975. 

Dessem, Dean, Assistant Professor, Physiology, B.S., 
Tulane University, 1976; Ph.D., University of Illi- 
nois, 1985. 

DeVore, Duane T., Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery, D.D.S., Loyola University of Chicago, 
1956; Ph.D., University of London, 1975; J.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1979. 

DeVore, Linda, Associate Professor, Dental Hygiene, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; M.A., 1982. 

Di Fabio, Vincent E., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Xavier Uni- 
versity, 1967; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1971; 
M.S., University of Rochester, 1979. 

DiNardo, Hector F.P., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Loyola College, 
1949; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Drum, Ray K., Clinical Associate Professor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.S., Ursinus College, 1956; D.D.S., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

Dumsha, Thomas C, Associate Professor, Endodon- 
tics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1972; M.S., 
1976; D.D.S., 1979. 

Durkee, Mark C, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., Trenton State College, 1980; M.S., Lehigh 
University, 1982; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1991. 

Eastwood, Gerald W., Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Concordia Col- 
lege, 1955; D.M.D., University of Oregon, 1959; 
M.A., George Washington University, 1981. 

Eisen, Mark Z., Assistant Professor, Oral and Maxillo- 
facial Surgery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; 
D.D.S., 1973. 

Eldridge, Roger L., Dental School Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1975; D.D.S., 1978. 

Elias, Samia A., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.D.S., Alexandria Univer- 
sity (Egypt), 1965; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1985. 

Ellis, Richard, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.D.S., University of Otago, New Zealand, 1985. 

Exler, Alan S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1972; D.D.S., 1977. 

Falkler, William A., Jr., Professor, Microbiology, B.A., 
Western Maryland College, 1966; M.S., University 
of Maryland, 1969; Ph.D., 1971. 



Faraone, Karen L., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, R.N., University of Mary- 
land, 1974; B.S., 1974; D.D.S., 1978; M.A., 1983. 

Fedele, Denise J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Columbia University, 
1979; M.S., State University of New York at Buf- 
falo, 1983; D.M.D., Tufts University, 1987. 

Feldman, Sylvan, Clinical Associate Professor, Peri- 
odontics/Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1962; D.D.S., 1965. 

Franklin, Renty B., Professor, Physiology, B.S., More- 
house College, 1966; M.S., Atlanta University, 
1967; Ph.D., Howard University, 1972. 

Freedman, Gerson A., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1935. 

Freilich, Lawrence S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pe- 
riodontics, D.D.S., Temple University, 1962; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1972. 

Fried, Ivan S. (Scott), Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Ten- 
nessee, 1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1977. 

Fried, Jacquelyn L., Associate Professor, Dental Hy- 
giene, B.A., Ohio State University, 1968; M.S., Old 
Dominion University, 1976. 

Gamson, Edward K., Clinical Assistant Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1982; 
D.D.S., 1986. 

Garber, Karen, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral Med- 
icine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Northeastern 
University, 1978; D.M.D., University of Pennsylva- 
nia, 1982. 

Garcia, Anthony, Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.A., University of Maryland, 1985; 
D.D.S., 1989. 

Garelick, Jeffrey S., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., State University of New York 
at Stony Brook, 1983; D.D.S., New York Univer- 
sity, 1989. 

Gartner, Leslie P., Associate Professor, Anatomy, 
B.A., Rutgers University, 1965; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 
1970. 

Gaston, Gerald W., Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery, B.S., Miami University, 1952; D.D.S., 
Ohio State University, 1959; Ph.D., 1972. 

Gaston, Judith, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Physiol- 
ogy, B.S., University of Detroit, 1980; M.S., 1982. 

Geboy, Michael, Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1971; M.S., 1978; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1978. 

George, David L., Instructor, Oral Health Care Deliv- 
ery, D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1984. 

Gerhardt, Donald E., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Ohio Wesleyan 



48 . DENTAL SCHOOL 



University, 1955; D.M.D., Tufts University, 1959; 
M.S., University of Texas, 1971. 

Gher, Marlin E., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Kansas, 1968; D.D.S., 
University of Missouri, 1971. 

Gierlach, John G., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry., B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; 
B.D.S., Sydney University, 1977. 

Gillis, Marie V., Clinical Instructor, Dental Hygiene, 
B.S., University College of Northeastern Univer- 
sity, 1986. 

Gingell, James C., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972; M.S., 1983. 

Ginsberg, Edward L., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pe- 
diatric Dentistry, B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1978; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Goldbeck, Raymond E., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Loyola Col- 




V. 



lege, 1976; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 

Goodman, Harry, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Rutgers University, 
1972; D.M.D., College of Medicine and Dentistry of 
New Jersey, 1975; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1986. 

Goose, Charles M., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.A., University of South Florida, 1982; D.M.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1992. 

Grace, Edward G., Jr., Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Mount St. Mary's Col- 
lege, 1960; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1964; 
M.A. Loyola College, 1981; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1987. 

Greeley, James H., Clinical Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 
1959; M.S.D., Indiana University, 1966. 

Greenbaum, Jack L., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of New 
Hampshire, 1969; D.M.D., University of Pennsylva- 



nia, 1973; M.A., San Diego State University, 1977 
M.S., New York University, 1982. 

Griswold, William H., Clinical Associate Professor 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland 
1958; D.D.S., 1963. 

Gunderson, Ronald B., Dental School Associate Pro 
fessor, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Western Mary 
land College, 1967; D.D.S., University of Maryland 
1971. 

Hack, Gary D., Instructor, Restorative Dentistry 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1975; D.D.S., 1979. 

Halpert, Lawrence F., Clinical Professor, Periodontics 
A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958; D.D.S. 
University of Maryland, 1962. 

Hasler, John F., Professor, Oral Medicine and Diag 
nostic Sciences, B.S., Indiana University, 1959 
D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

Hatfield, Helen, Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1973; M.Ed., 1977. 

Hawley, Charles E., Professor, Periodontics/Microbiol- 
ogy, A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; 
D.D.S. , University of Pennsylvania, 1962; M.S., 
University of Illinois, 1970; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1976. 

Hendler, Nelson H., Adjunct Clinical Associate Pro- 
fessor, Physiology, B.A., Princeton University, 
1966; M.D., University of Maryland, 1972; M.S., 
1974. 

Hiatt, James L., Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.S., 
Ball State University, 1959; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1973. 

Hollinger, Jeffrey O., Adjunct Faculty, Anatomy, 
B.A., Hofstra University, 1969; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1973; Ph.D., 1983. 

Hooper, Kenny A., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.A., Morgan State University, 1969; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1978. 

Hovland, Eric J., Professor, Endodontics, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972; M.Ed., Vir- 
ginia Commonwealth University, 1977; M.B.A., 
Loyola College, 1980. 

Hyson, John, Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1950; M.S., 1959. 

Hyson, John M., Ill, Clinical Assistant Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.S., Loyola College, 1974; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1979. 

Iddings, John R., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Roanoke College, 1962; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 

Iglarsh, Z. Annette, Adjunct Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Physiology, B.S., City College of New York, 
1970; M.A.T., Alaska Methodist University, 1971; 
B.S., Upstate Medical College of Health Related 
Professionals, 1975; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1983. 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY- 49 



Imm, Gary R., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1978; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1982. 

Inge, Walter H., Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., James Madison Univer- 
sity, 1977; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 
1982. 

Irwin, Christina, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., Portland State University, 
1979; D.M.D., Oregon Health Sciences University, 
1986. 

Jenkins, Thomas Scott, Clinical Instructor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., Northwestern University, 1988; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1992. 

Jones, Omar J., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Endodontics/Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1973. 



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Josell, Stuart D., Associate Professor, Orthodontics/ 
Pediatric Dentistry, D.M.D., Fairleigh Dickinson 
University, 1974; M.Dent.Sc, University of Con- 
necticut, 1979. 

Junghans, Philip S., Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Richmond, 1987, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1991. 

Kassolis, James D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1973. 

Katz, Nathan, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., Georgetown Univer- 
sity, 1948. 

Kearns, Mark, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, B.S., 
Juniata University, 1988; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1992. 

Kelly, William P., Clinical Associate Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.S., Indiana University, 1950; D.D.S., 
1953; M.A.Ed., The George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1974. 

Kihn, Francis J., Clinical Professor, Pediatric Den- 
tistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1952; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1956. 



Kilian, Jerry A., Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, B.S., Towson State University, 1974; M.S., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1975; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1981. 

Kim, Il-Bong, Visiting Clinical Associate Professor, 
Orthodontics, D.D.S., Dental College of Seoul Na- 
tional University, 1961; Ph.D., Seoul National Uni- 
versity, 1973. 

Koch, Douglas J., Clinical Assistant Professor, En- 
dodontics; B.S., Union College, 1983; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1983. 

Kogan, Stanley, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1954. 

Kreiner, D. Bartholomew, Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Loyola 
College, 1986; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1989. 

Kristallis, Thanos, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., The National Cap- 
odistrean University of Athens, 1987. 

Krywolap, George N., Professor, Microbiology, B.S., 
Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S., Penn- 
sylvania State University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

Kuntz, Richard, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
Dickinson College, 1979; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1983. 

Lauttman, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1953; D.D.S. University of Maryland, 1960. 

Lazzaro, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., Fairleigh Dickenson University, 
1968; D.M.D., 1972; M.S., Boston University, 
1976. 

Lee, Raymond J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1970; D.D.S., 1974. 

Leonard, Charles B., Professor, Biochemistry, B.A., 
Rutgers College, 1955; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 

Lever, Barry S., Clinical Associate Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954; 
D.D.S., 1958. 

Levickas, Thomas R., Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., Mount St. Mary's College, 1964; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1968. 

Levinson, Philip D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, D.D.S. , University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1965. 

Levy, Bernard A., Associate Professor, Oral Pathoiogy, 
A.B., Ohio University, 1963; D.D.S., Western Re- 
serve University, 1966; M.S.D., Indiana University, 
1969. 

Lewis, Frances S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1984. 



50. DENTAL SCHOOL 



Liggett, Martha L., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Nebraska, 
1972; M.S., Columbia University, 1975; J.D., 
Georgetown University, 1983. 

Lipps, Karen, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, B.S.N. , 
Spalding University, 1976; D.M.D., University of 
Louisville, 1991. 

Litkowski, Leonard J., Associate Professor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; 
M.S., 1983; D.D.S., 1985. 

Long, Ross E., Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1970; D.M.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1974; M.S., 1978; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1979. 

Luposello, Mark A., Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., Tufts University 1986; D.M.D., University of 
Florida, 1990. 

Maltz, Michael L., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.A., Yeshiva University, 1985; D.M.D., University 
of New Jersey, 1990. 

Manski, Richard J., Associate Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., Boston College, 1976; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1980; M.B.A., University of 
Massachusetts, 1985. 

Manson, Barry, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A./B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Markin, Philip S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1963; D.D.S., 
1966; M.S., Loyola University of Chicago, 1972. 

Maro, Jr., Peter D., Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo, 
1987; D.M.D., M.S., University of Louisville, 1992. 

Mastella, Stephen, Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1982; D.M.D., 
Temple University, 1986. 

McDonald, Neville J., Assistant Professor, Endodon- 
tics, B.Sc, University of Otago, New Zealand, 
1975; B.D.S., 1978; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1987. 

Mecklenburg, Robert E., Clinical Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Min- 
nesota, 1955; D.D.S., 1957; M.P.H., University of 
California at Berkeley, 1963. 

Meeks, Valli, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Thomas Jefferson Uni- 
versity, 1977; B.S., Springfield College, 1981; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1988. 

Meiller, Timothy F., Associate Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1970; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1975; M.S., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1978, Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1992. 

Meszler, Richard M., Associate Professor, Anatomy, 
A.B., New York University, 1964; Ph.D., University 
of Louisville, 1969. 



Miller, Suzan E., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, B.A., Beloit College, 1974; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1983. 

Miller, Thomas E., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., St. John's University, 
1955; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1959; M.A., 
George Washington University, 1976. 

Minah, Glenn E., Professor, Microbiology/Pediatric 
Dentistry, A.B., Duke University, 1961; D.D.S., 
University of North Carolina, 1966; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1970; Ph.D., 1976. 

Mocknick, Michael C, Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
tics, B.S., West Chester University, 1977; D.M.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1981. 

Moreland, Ernest F., Professor, Educational and In- 
structional Resources, B.S., University of Georgia, 
1960; M.A., Western Carolina University, 1962; 
Ed.D., Indiana University, 1967. 

Morgan, Andrea M., Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.A., University of Michigan, 1985, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1990, M.S., Uni- 
versity of Detroit/Mercy School of Dentistry, 1992. 

Morganstein, Warren M., Professor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; 
D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1975. 

Morrison, Grace, Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1984; 
D.D.S., 1988. 

Mort, Kenneth E., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1967; M.S., University of Missouri, 1970. 

Myslinski, Norbert R., Associate Professor, Physiol- 
ogy, B.S., Canisius College, 1969; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois, 1973. 

Naghdi, Jina, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, B.S., 
Franklin and Marshall College, 1987; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1991. 

Nauman, Robert K., Associate Professor, Microbiol- 
ogy, B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1963; 
M.S., University of Massachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 
1968. 

Nessif, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Marshall Univer- 
sity, 1973; D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1979. 

Niehaus, Carol S., Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1984; D.D.S., 1992. 

Oates, Stephen, Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1984. 

O'Connell, Anne, Assistant Professor, Pediatric Den- 
tistry, B.A., B.D.S., Trinity College, Ireland, 1984; 
M.S., University of Rochester, 1991. 

Odell, Deborah, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
Case Western Reserve, 1989; D.D.S., 1991. 




ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY. 51 




Olson, Carl R., Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.A., 
Harvard University, 1966; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1967; Ph.D., University of California at Berke- 
ley, 1979. 

Ord, Robert, Associate Professor, Oral and Maxillofa- 
cial Surgery, B.D.S., Kings College Hospital Dental 
School, 1970; M.B., B.Ch., Welsh National School 
of Medicine, 1977. 

Overholser, C. Daniel, Jr., Professor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of Notre 
Dame, 1966; D.D.S., Indiana University, 1970; 
M.S.D., 1972. 

Owen, David G., Associate Professor, Pediatric Den- 
tistry, A.B., Syracuse University, 1960; D.D.S., 
McGill University, 1964; A.M., University of 
Chicago, 1969. 

Palmer, James E., Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1961. 

Pannebaker, Judith H., Clinical Instructor, Oral Med- 
icine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., West Virginia 
University, 1972; B.A., University of Maryland, 
1981. 

Parente, Frederick, Adjunct Associate Professor, Phys- 
iology, B.A., California State University at San 
Diego, 1971; M.A., University of New Mexico, 
1974; Ph.D., 1975. 

Park, Jon K., Associate Professor, Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., University of Missouri, 
1964; B.A., Wichita State University, 1969; M.S., 
University of Missouri, 1971. 

Park, Sarah K., Clinical Assistant Professor, Periodon- 
tics, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1978; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Park, Susan, Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthodon- 
tics, B.A., Bard College, 1975; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1983. 

Parker, Elaine, Associate Professor, Dental Hygiene, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1982. 

Passaro, Peter L., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1972. 

Pavlick, Charles T., Jr., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1961; 
D.D.S., 1961; M.S., University of Illinois, 1966. 

Payne, Thomas M., Dental School Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1968; M.S., 1976; D.D.S., 1978. 

Perell, Ann L., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege, 1980; M.S., University of Iowa, 1983; D.D.S., 
1987. 

Phillips, Bradley L., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., State University of New York at 
Stony Brook, 1974; D.M.D., Harvard University, 
1976. 



52 • 11 E N T A L SCHOOL 



Plessett, David N., Clinical Associate Professor, Peri- 
"bdontics, B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 
1949; D.D.S., Temple University, 1958. 

Pohlhaus, Steven R., Clinical Instructor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1989. 

Progebin, Keith, Clinical Assistant Professor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.S., State University of New York 
at Binghampton, 1983; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1987. 

Prymas, Stuart D., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1978. 

Pupkin, Andrew, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1983; D.D.S., 1987. 

Quarantillo, Frederick J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; 
D.D.S., 1973; M.S., George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1978. 

Raksin, Irving J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1960; D.D.S., 1964. 

Ranney, Richard R., Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Iowa, 1963; M.S., University of 
Rochester, 1969. 

Rauschenberger, Cindy R., Assistant Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.A., Augustana College, 1979; D.D.S., 
Univeristy of Iowa, 1987; M.S., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1989. 

Reese, Errol L., Professor, Restorative Dentistry, B.S., 
Fairmount State College, 1960; D.D.S., West Vir- 
ginia University, 1963; M.S., University of Detroit, 
1968. 

Rekow, Elizabeth D., Associate Professor, Orthodon- 
tics; Adjunct Faculty, Anatomy, B.S., University of 
Minnesota, 1966; B.S.M.E., 1970; M.B.A., College 
of St. Thomas, 1978; M.S.M.E., University of Min- 
nesota, 1982; D.D.S., 1983; Ph.D., 1988. 

Rekow, Marlin F., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Min- 
nesota, 1968; D.D.S., 1970; M.B.A., College of St. 
Thomas, 1978. 

Rethman, Michael P., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pe- 
riodontics, D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1974; 
M.S., George Washington University, 1982. 

Richter, Henry E., Jr., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1954; D.D.S., 1958. 

Robinson, Robert L., Clinical Instructor, Division of 
Dental Informatics, B.S.E.E., Drexel University, 
1972; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1980. 

Robson, M. Leslie, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.A., Idaho State University, 1977. 

Romberg, Elaine, Professor, Educational and Instruc- 






tional Resources, B.S., Vassar College, 1960; M.Ed., 
Lesley College, 1963; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1977. 

Rosen, Paul S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Periodon- 
tics, B.A., Lafayette College, 1982; D.M.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1986. 

Rubier, Constance G., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, 1973; B.S., 1974; M.S., 1975; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1979. 

Rudo, Frieda G., Research Professor, Pharmacology, 
A.B., Goucher College, 1944; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 1963; D.Sc, Goucher Col- 
lege, 1976. 

RuDusky, Bryan M., Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1985, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1990. 

Rule, James T., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., 
Temple University, 1953; D.D.S., 1957; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1960. 

Ruliffson, Franklin R., Clinical Instructor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.A., State University of Iowa, 1949; 
D.D.S., 1954; M.A., George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1980. 

Sachs, Robert I., Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics/Restorative Dentistry, B.A., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1967; M.S., Purdue University, 
1972; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Saedi, Simin, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., School of Dentistry, 
Tehran University, 1970. 

Samuels, Cheryl T., Associate Professor, Dental Hy- 
giene, B.S., Ohio State University, 1967; M.S., 
University of Michigan, 1971, Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1991. 

Sauk, John J., Professor, Oral Pathology, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Detroit, 1963; D.D.S., 1967; M.S., University 
of Minnesota, 1971. 

Scaggs, Gary W., Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1972; D.D.S., 
1978. 

Schlank, Eugene A., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Xavier University, 
1978; D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1981. 

Schlobohm, Cord H., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Villanova University, 
1984; D.M.D., University of Medicine and Den- 
tistry of New Jersey, 1988. 

Schmidt, Keith A., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Miami University, 
1984; D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1987. 

Schulz, Earle M., Clinical Associate Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960; 
D.D.S., 1962; M.S., University of Iowa, 1972. 

Schunick, Howard E., Clinical Associate Professor, 



Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 

D.D.S., 1962. 
Schwartz, Harry, Clinical Assistant Professor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 

D.D.S., 1965. 
Scornavacca, Ronald J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 

Orthodontics, B.S., Villanova University, 1964; 

D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1968. 
Sebastien, Scott M., Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 

B.A., Simon Fraser University, 1985; D.D.S., Case 

Western Reserve, 1990. 
Segal, Edward, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 

York University, Canada, 1986; D.D.S., State Uni- 
versity of New York, 1990. 
Seibel, Werner, Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.A., 

Brooklyn College, 1965; M.A., Hofstra University, 

1968; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University, 

1972. 
Selnick, Sandra E., Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 

B.S., University of Miami, 1985; D.D.S., University 

of Maryland, 1989. 
Serio, Francis G., Associate Professor, Periodontics, 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1976; 

D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1980. 




Sestokas, Anthony, Adjunct Faculty, Anatomy, 
B.S.C., McMaster University, 1975; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Western Ontario, 1976; M.A., Northeastern 
University, 1981; Ph.D., 1981. 

Shelton, Preston G., Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.S., John Carroll University, 1963; 
D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1967; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1971. 

Shires, P. Jay, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., University of Richmond, 1982; 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1986. 

Shroff, Bhavna, Assistant Professor, Orthodontics, 
D.D.S., Paris V, 1982; M.Dent.Sc, University of 
Connecticut, 1989. 

Shulman, Eli M., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY. 53 




Health Care Delivery, A.B., Ohio State University, 
1942; D.D.S., 1947. 

Siegel, Michael A., Assistant Professor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1975; D.D.S., 1979. 

Siegel, Robert, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., City College of New 
York, 1954; D.D.S., New York University, 1958 
M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1983. 

Siegel, Sharon C, Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1975 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Siegel, Steven M., Assistant Professor, Orthodontics 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1976; D.M.D., Tufts Uni 
versity, 1980. 

Sim, Samuel, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., Towson State University, 1979 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Sindler, Arnold, Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri 
odontics, B.S., The Johns Hopkins University 
1966; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1976. 

Slotke, Noel E., Clinical Instructor, Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1981. 

Smith, Richard J., Clinical Professor, Orthodontics 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1969; M.S., Tufts Univer 
sity, 1973; D.M.D., 1973; M. Phil., Yale University, 
1978; Ph.D., 1980. 

Stanford, Hilton G., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.A., University of Cali 
fornia at Los Angeles, 1950; D.D.S., Howard Uni 
versity, 1959. 

Stevens, Mark M., Dental School Associate Professor 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., St. Louis University, 
1960. 

Strassler, Howard E., Associate Professor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., State University of New York at 
Stony Brook, 1971; D.M.D., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1975. 

Streckfus, Charles, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1970; M.S., Towson State College, 
1973; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Suzuki, Jon B., Research Professor, Periodontics, B.A., 
Illinois Wesleyan University, 1968; Ph.D., Illinois 
Institute of Technology, 1971; D.D.S., Loyola Uni- 
versity, 1978. 

Swancar, James R., Associate Professor, Oral Pathol- 
ogy, B.A., Western Reserve University, 1952; 
D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 1963. 

Swanson, Jr., Ben Z., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Houston, 1959; D.D.S., University of Texas, 1959; 
M.Phil., University College, London, 1988. 

Sweren, Edgar, Clinical Assistant Professor, Ortho- 



dontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954- 
Switzer, Victoria, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; B.S., 1985 

D.D.S., 1992. 
Sydiskis, Robert J., Associate Professor, Microbiology 

B.A., University of Bridgeport, 1961; Ph.D., North 

western University, 1965. 
Tate, Don L., Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den 

tistry, A. A., Community College of Baltimore 

1975; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 
Tewes, Ligouri, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.S. 

University of Maryland, 1981. 
Tewes, Warren D., Dental School Assistant Professor 

Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Randolph Macon 

College, 1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland 

1975; M.S., 1982. 
Thompson, Van P., Professor, Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1966; Ph.D. 

1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 
Thut, Paul D., Professor, Pharmacology/Biochemistry 

A.B., Hamilton College, 1965; M.S., University of 

Rhode Island, 1968; Ph.D., Dartmouth College 

1971. 
Tilghman, Donald M., Professor, Oral and Maxillofa 

cial Surgery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 

D.D.S., 1961. 
Trail, Leo V., Clinical Assistant Professor, Ora 

Health Care Delivery/Periodontics, B.S., Mt. St 

Mary's College, 1975; D.D.S., University of Mary 

land, 1979. 
Trattner, Bradley, A., Clinical Assistant Professor 

Endodontics, B.S., State University of New York ai 

Albany, 1984; D.D.S., University of Maryland 

1988. 
Urbaitis, Barbara K., Assistant Professor, Physiology 

B.A., Hunter College, 1963; M.S., 1965; Ph.D. 

Cornell University, 1968. 
Vail, Arthur E., Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den 

tistry, B.A., University of Maryland, 1981; D.D.S. 

1983. 
VandenBosche, Raoul C, Clinical Assistant Profes 

sor, Restorative Dentistry, A.B., College of the 

Holy Cross, 1962; D.D.S., University of Maryland 

1966. 
Vandermer, Jack D., Clinical Assistant Professor 

General Practice Residency, B.S., Pennsylvania 

State University, 1963; D.D.S., University of Mary 

land, 1967; M.Ed., 1973. 
Van Sickle, Deborah, Clinical Instructor, Periodon 

tics, B.S., Tufts University, 1985; D.D.S., Univer 

sity of Maryland, 1992. 
Varma, Shambu D., Research Professor, Biochemistry 

B.S., University of Allahabad, India, 1955; M.S. 

1957; Ph.D., University of Rajasthan, India, 1964. 
Vera, Anny B., Clinical Assistant Professor, Restora 



^•DENTAL SCHOOL 



tive Dentistry, B.S., Colegio Maria Montessori, 
1971; D.D.S., Central University of Venezuela, 
1976; M.S., University of Maryland, 1989. 

Vu, Anh Q., Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1986. 

Wagner, Mark L., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, A.B., 
Birmingham Southern College, 1959; D.M.D., Uni- 
versity of Alabama, 1963. 

Ward, Michael, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Towson State Univer- 
sity, 1974; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1977; 
M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1985. 

Warren, Denise, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Detroit, 1975. 

Waxman, Burton M., Clinical Assistant Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.A., Clark University, 1973; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1978. 




Way, Kenneth, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.D.S., Institute of Dental Medicine, Burma, 1979; 
D.M.D., University of Connecticut, 1986. 

Wealcatch, Samuel A., Clinical Instructor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1985; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1990. 

Weiner, Stephen A., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 1969. 

Weisberg, Alan S., Clinical Assistant Professor, Or- 
thodontics, D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1955. 

Welch, R. Dale, Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1969; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1975. 

Wellejus, Matthew T., Clinical Instructor, Periodon- 
tics, B.S., Penn State University, 1983; D.M.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1987. 

Whitaker, George C, Clinical Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Earlham College, 1970; 
D.D.S., Howard University, 1974; M.S.D., Indiana 
University, 1977. 



Williams, George C., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Washington 
College, 1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1978. 

Williams, George H., Ill, Associate Professor, Den- 
tistry, UMMS, B.S., Tusculum College, 1962; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 

Williams, Henry N., Associate Professor, Microbiol- 
ogy, B.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Techni- 
cal State University, 1964; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1972; Ph.D., 1979. 

Williams, Robert E., Clinical Associate Professor, Or- 
thodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1966; 
D.M.D., 1969; M.A., University of Maryland, 1982. 

Wilson, Margaret B., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., David Lip- 
scomb College, 1977; D.D.S., Medical College of 
Virginia, 1981; M.B.A., University of Maryland, 
1990. 

Winson, Dennis E., Clinical Associate Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 
D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1965. 

Wood, Gregory A., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, D.D.S., Marquette University, 1971. 

Wood, Morton, Associate Professor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, B.A., American International College, 1965; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1969; M.Ed., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1979. 

Wood, Steven C., Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., Auburn University, 1984, D.M.D., Medical 
College of Virginia, 1991. 

Wynn, Richard L., Professor, Pharmacology, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1964; M.S., 1966; Ph.D., 
1970. 

Yakoumatos, John C., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., Western Maryland College, 
1981; D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1985. 

Yellowitz, Janet, Assistant Professor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., Columbia University, 1972; M.P.H., 
University of Minnesota, 1979; D.M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1987. 

Zeller, Gregory G., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1975; M.S., 1983. 

Zeren, Karl J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Periodon- 
tics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; D.D.S., 
1975. 

Zimmerman, John L., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Educational and Instructional Resources, 
Assistant Director, Academic Computing, B.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1976; D.D.S., Tem- 
ple University, 1980. 

Zupnik, Edward A., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1988; D.D.S., 1992. 

Zupnik, Robert M., Clinical Professor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; D.D.S., 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY* 55 



Georgetown University, 1958; M.S.D., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1964. 



Associate Staff 

Akuffo, Valorie, Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sci- 
ences, B.S., Howard University, 1972. 

Allen, Sandy, Director, Central Materials Services, 
B.S., University of Baltimore, 1984. 

Baier, Richard G., Central Dental Laboratory Ser- 
vices, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1976. 

Copelan, Nancy, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1988. 

Court, Lisa, Director of Development, B.A., State 
University of New York at Oswego, 1983. 

Dempsey, Deanne, A. A., New York State Regents, 
1986. 

Garner, Wilhelma G., Assistant Director of Admis- 
sions and Recruitment, B.A., Fisk University, 1966; 
M.Ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Groves, Keith, Anatomy. 

Hebert, Carla, Oral Pathology, B.S., Loyola College, 
1986. 

Kaur, Manjit, Microbiology, B.S., Jai Hind College, 
India, 1985; M.S., University of Maryland, 1990. 

Kelly, Jacqueline, Microbiology, B.S., Towson State 
University, 1989. 

King, William F., Jr., Central Dental Laboratory Ser- 
vices, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1971. 

Land, Myra R., Educational and Instructional Re- 
sources, A.B., Goucher College, 1956. 

Lawson, Harvey W., Orthodontics, A.A., Community 
College of Baltimore, 1985. 

McCleary, Leslie, Anatomy, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1992. 

Organ, Robert J., Microbiology. 

Reynolds, James, Director of Fiscal and Personnel Af- 
fairs, Dean's Office, B.A., Michigan State Univer- 
sity, 1974; M.B.A., University of Rochester, 1980. 

Suls, Frederick J., Central Dental Laboratory Services, 
A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 1972. 

Williams, Deloris, Special Events Coordinator. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT 
BALTIMORE 

Errol L. Reese, D.D.S., M.S., President 

Ernest F. Moreland, Ed.D., Vice President, Academic 

Affairs 
James T. Hill, Jr., M.P.A., Vice President, Administrative 

Services 



il • DENTAL SCHOOL 



T. Sue Gladhill, M.S.W., Vice President, Governmental 

Affairs 
Joann A. Boughman, Ph.D., Vice President, Research 

and Dean, Graduate School 
Marion J. Ball, Ed.D., Vice President, Information Services 
Fred Brooke Lee, Vice President, Institutional Advancement 
Morton I. Rapoport, M.D., President and Chief Executive 

Officer, University of Maryland Medical System 
Richard R. Ranney, D.D.S., Dean, Dental School 
Donald G. Gifford, J.D., Dean, School ofLavj 
Donald E. Wilson, M.D., Dean, School of Medicine 
Barbara R. Heller, Ed.D., Dean, School of Nursing 
David A. Knapp, Ph.D., Dean, School of Pharmacy 
Jesse J. Harris, D.S.W., Dean, School of Social Work 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SYSTEM 

Board of Regents 

Margaret Alton 
The Honorable Mary Arabian 
Richard O. Berndt 
Roger Blunt 
Benjamin L. Brown 
Earle Palmer Brown 
Charles W. Cole, Jr. 
Frank A. Gunther, Jr. 
Ilona M. Hogan 
Ann Hull 
Henry R. Lord 
George V. McGowan 
Frank P. Perdue 
Constance M. Unseld 
Robert L. Walker, Ex Officio 
Albert N. Whiting, Ph.D. 
Margaret Woodhull 

Central Administration 

Donald N. Langenberg, Ph.D., Chancellor of the 

University 
George L. Marx, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor, Academic 

Affairs 
John K. Martin, Vice Chancellor, Advancement 
Donald L. Myers, M.B.A., Vice Chancellor, General 

Administration 



Alumni Association 



The Alumni Association is an independent orga- 
nization of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland 
at Baltimore, representing almost 6,000 graduates 
worldwide. With headquarters in the Dental 
School and five chartered sections, the associa- 
tion is actively interested in the organizational 
structure of the school. 

The annual meeting is held during Alumni 
Week and coincides with graduation. Each year 
alumni receptions are held throughout the coun- 
try, and officers of the association participate 
whenever possible. In addition, social affairs are 
held at the Dental School for the students and 
alumni. 

Yearly the association honors one of the 
alumni by bestowing its highest award, the Dis- 
tinguished Alumnus Award. 




Offic 



President 

Dr. M. Eugene Hinds '52 
305 Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Treasurer 

Dr. George H. Williams III '66 
12116 Jerusalem Road 
Kingsville, Maryland 21087 



President Elect 
Dr. D. Michael Brown '61 
1694 Justin Drive 
Gambrills, Maryland 21054 



Editor 

Dr. John F. Patterson 

21 West Road 

Towson, Maryland 21204 



First Vice President 
Dr. Frank A. Dolle '59 
1213 Dulaney Valley Road 

Towson, Maryland 21204 



His torian-Archivis t 
Dr. Gardner P.H. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 



Second Vice President 
Dr. Frank J. Romeo '66 
6305 Belair Road 
Towson, Maryland 21204 



Past President 
Dr. James R. Sullivan '57 
419 Burnt Mills Avenue 
Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 



Executive Director 
Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 
6810 North Charles Street 
Towson, Maryland 21204 

Secretary 

Dr. Van P. Thompson '79 
6168 Llanfair Drive 
Columbia, Maryland 21044 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION'S? 



Policy Statements 




FACULTY, STUDENT AND 
INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ACADEMIC 
INTEGRITY 

Preamble 

The academic enterprise is characterized by rea- 
soned discussion between student and teacher, a 
mutual respect for the learning and teaching 
process, and intellectual honesty in the pursuit of 
new knowledge. By tradition, students and teachers 
have certain rights and responsibilities which they 
bring to the academic community. While the fol- 
lowing statements do not imply a contract between 
the teacher or the institution and the student, they 
are nevertheless conventions which should be cen- 
tral to the learning and teaching process. 



Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Faculty members shall share with students and 
administrators the responsibility for academic 
integrity. 

2. Faculty members shall enjoy freedom in the 
classroom to discuss subject matter reasonably re- 
lated to the course. In turn they have the re- 
sponsibility to encourage free and honest inquiry 
and expression on the part of students. 

3. Faculty members, consistent with the principles 
of academic freedom, have the responsibility to 
present courses that are consistent with their de- 
scriptions in the catalog of the institution. In ad- 
dition, faculty members have the obligation to 
make students aware of the expectations in the 
course, the evaluation procedures and the grad- 
ing policy. 

4- Faculty members are obligated to evaluate stu- 
dents fairly and equitably and in a manner appro- 
priate to the course and its objectives. Grades 
shall be assigned without prejudice or bias. 

5. Faculty members shall make all reasonable efforts 
to prevent the occurrence of academic dishon- 
esty through appropriate design and administra- 
tion of assignments and examinations, careful 
safeguarding of course materials and examina- 
tions, and regular reassessment of evaluation 
procedures. 

6. When instances of academic dishonesty are sus- 
pected, faculty members shall have the responsi- 
bility to see that appropriate action is taken in 
accordance with institutional regulations. 



Student Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Students share with faculty and administrators 
the responsibility for academic integrity. 

2. Students shall have the right of free and honest 
inquiry and expression in their courses. In addi- 
tion, students shall have the right to know the 
requirements of their courses and to know the 
manner in which they will be evaluated and 
graded. 

3. Students shall have the obligation to complete 
the requirements of their courses in the time and 
manner prescribed and to submit to evaluation of 
their work. 

4- Students shall have the right to be evaluated 
fairly, equitably and in a timely manner appropri- 
ate to the course and its objectives. 

5. Students shall not submit as their own work any 
work which has been prepared by others. Outside 
assistance in the preparation of this work, such as 
librarian assistance, tutorial assistance, typing as- 
sistance, or such special assistance as may be 
specified or approved by the appropriate faculty 
members, is allowed. 

6. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to pre- 
vent the occurrence of academic dishonesty. 
They shall by their own example encourage aca- 
demic integrity and shall themselves refrain from 
acts of cheating and plagiarism or other acts of 
academic dishonesty. 

7. When instances of academic dishonesty are sus- 
pected, students shall have the right and respon- 
sibility to bring this to the attention of the fac- 
ulty or other appropriate authority. 



Institutional Responsibility 

1. Constituent institutions of the University of 
Maryland System shall take appropriate measures 
to foster academic integrity in the classroom. 

2. Each institution shall take steps to define acts of 
academic dishonesty, to insure procedures for due 
process for students accused or suspected ol acts 
of academic dishonesty, and to impose appropri- 
ate sanctions on students found to be guilty of 
acts of academic dishonesty. 

3. Students expelled or suspended for reasons of 
academic dishonesty by any institution in the 
University of Maryland System shall inn be ad- 
mitted to any other System institution during the 
period of expulsion or suspension. 

Approved, November 10, 1989 by the Boardoj Regents 



Ss . DHNTAL SCH on I 



CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF 
STUDENT RECORDS 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore to adhere to the Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). As such, 
it is the policy of the university ( 1 ) to permit stu- 
dents to inspect their education records, (2) to limit 
disclosure to others of personally identifiable in- 
formation from education records without students' 
prior written consent and (3) to provide students 
the opportunity to seek correction of their educa- 
tion records where appropriate. Each school shall 
develop policies to ensure that this policy is 
implemented. 



SCHEDULING OF ACADEMIC 
ASSIGNMENTS ON DATES OF RELIGIOUS 
OBSERVANCE 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore to excuse the absence(s) of students that re- 
sult from the observance of religious holidays. Stu- 
dents shall be given the opportunity, whenever 
feasible, to make up, within a reasonable time, any 
academic assignments that are missed due to indi- 
vidual participation in religious observances. Oppor- 
tunities to make up missed academic assignments 
shall be timely and shall not interfere with the regu- 
lar academic assignments of the student. Each 
school/academic unit shall adopt procedures to en- 
sure implementation of this policy. 

ELIGIBILITY TO REGISTER AT UMAB 

A student may register at UMAB when the follow- 
ing conditions are met: ( 1 ) the student is accepted 
to UMAB, (2) the student has received approval 
from the unit academic administrator and (3) the 
student has demonstrated academic and financial 
eligibility. 



REVIEW OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND 
CAPRICIOUS GRADING 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore that students be provided a mechanism to re- 
view course grades that are alleged to be arbitrary or 
capricious. Each school/academic unit shall develop 
guidelines and procedures to provide a means for a 
student to seek review of course grades. These guide- 
lines and procedures shall be published regularly in 
the appropriate media so that all faculty and stu- 
dents are informed about this policy. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
POSITION ON ACTS OF VIOLENCE AND 
EXTREMISM WHICH ARE RACIALLY, 
ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY OR 
POLITICALLY MOTIVATED. 

The Board of Regents strongly condemns criminal 
acts of destruction or violence against the person or 
property of others. Individuals committing such acts 
at any campus or facility of the university will be 
subject to swift campus judicial and personnel ac- 
tion, including possible expulsion or termination, as 
well as possible state criminal proceedings. 

SERVICE TO THOSE WITH INFECTIOUS 
DISEASES 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore to provide education and training to students 
for the purpose of providing care and service to all 
persons. The institution will employ appropriate 
precautions to protect providers in a manner meet- 
ing the patients' or clients' requirements, yet pro- 
tecting the interest of students and faculty partici- 
pating in the provision of such care or service. 

No student will be permitted to refuse to provide 
care or service to any assigned person in the absence 
of special circumstances placing the student at in- 
creased risk for an infectious disease. Any student 
who refuses to treat or serve an assigned person 
without prior consent of the school involved will 
be subject to penalties under appropriate academic 
procedures, such penalties to include suspension or 
dismissal. 




POLICY STATEMENTS. 59 



HUMAN RELATIONS CODE 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore has a Hu- 
man Relations Code for use by the entire campus 
community. The code represents UMAB's commit- 
ment to human relations issues. The specific pur- 
poses of the code include: 

1. Prevention or elimination of unlawful discrimi- 
nation on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, sex- 
ual orientation, marital status, age, ancestry or 
national origin, physical or mental handicap, or 
exercise of rights secured by the First Amend- 
ment of the U.S. Constitution; and 

2. Establishing a timely, effective grievance proce- 
dure as an alternative to more lengthy formal 
processes for resolution of human relations issues. 
A Human Relations Committee was created to 

oversee the code. It is comprised of campus faculty, 
administrators and students and is advisory to the 
president of the campus. The committee may insti- 
tute educational programs and provide an open fo- 
rum on human relations issues. In addition, the 
committee is charged with maintaining a mediation, 
investigation and hearing process for specific com- 
plaints of discrimination brought by students, fac- 
ulty or staff. The code describes the particulars of 
the hearing process. It is the intent of the code to 
provide a grievance procedure for any individual on 
campus who wants a cross-section of the campus 
community to investigate and mediate a problem 
without having to resort to complaints to external 
agencies such as the Maryland Commission on Hu- 
man Relations, complaints under personnel rules or 
lawsuits. 

Copies of the Human Relations Code are avail- 
able in the dean's office, the student affairs and 
USGA offices in the Baltimore Student Union, and 
the human resources management and affirmative 
action offices in the administration building. 




No provision of this publication shall be construed as a 
contract between any applicant or student and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore. The university re- 
serves the right to change any admission or advancement 
requirement at any time. The university further reserves 
the right to ask a student to withdraw at any time when 
it is considered to be in the best interest of the university. 



60 • DENTA L SCHOOL 



Maps 



The University of Maryland at Baltimore is located 
in downtown Baltimore, six blocks west of the 
Inner Harbor. 

DIRECTIONS 

From 1-95: Take Rte. 395 (downtown Balti- 
more) and exit onto Martin Luther King, Jr., 
Blvd., staying in right lane. At fourth traffic light, 
turn right onto Baltimore St.; turn left at second 
traffic light onto Paca Street and immediately 
into the Baltimore Grand Garage (visitor parking). 

Bits Access 

MTA buses numbered 1, 7, 8, 9, 11, 15, 20, 23, 
30, 31, 35, 36 and 150 all stop in the campus 
area. 





^ 

^^^ 


S| 


\70J 1 


vy 


^95/ 

5 Francis Scott 
y Key Bridge 


Baltimore St. | | | % 


Lombard St, | | /-Paca St 1 


-Martin LutherVI/ Stadium , 

.>, King, Jr. \| f!**i 1 | nnB TX t 

^^^^^■^^^^^ Fl McHe 

|295|Ballo.-Wash/^"^~ 
J Parkway 



Subway Access 

The Baltimore Metro runs from Charles Center 
to Owings Mills. Stops closest to campus are at 
Lexington Market and Charles Center. 



Light Rail 

A new Light Rail system connects northern Balti- 
more County and Oriole Park at Camden Yards. 
The UniversityCenter stop is at Howard and Bal- 
timore Streets. 




VP Visitors Parking PP Patient Parking SP Student Parking 



Academic and Patient Care Facilities 

19 Administration Building 
737 West Lombard Street 



13 Athletic Center 

646 Penn Street 
12 Baltimore Student Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

37 Biomedical Research Building 
108 North Greene Street 

38 (Walter P.) Carter Center 
630 West Fayette Street 

7 Davidge Hall 

522 West Lombard Street 
31 Dental School 

666 West Baltimore Strret 



East Hall 

520 West Lombard Street 



28 Health Sciences Facility (future) 
1 Health Sciences Library 

1 1 1 South Greene Street 
42 Hope Lodge 

636 West Lexington Street 
26 Howard Hall 

660 West Redwood Street 
36 Information Services Building 

100 North Greene Street 
33 



35 Maryland Bar Center 
520 West Fayette Street 

18 Medical Biotechnology Center 
(future home) 

27 Medical School 

Frank C Bressler Research Building 
655 West Baltimore Street 



15 Nursing School 

655 West Lombard Street 
24 Parsons Hall 

622 West Lombard Street 

40 Pascault Row 

651 -655 West Lexington Street 
30 Pharmacy School 
20 North Pine Street 

41 Pine Street Police Station 
214 North Pine Street 

39 Ronald McDonald House 

635 West Lexington Street 
5 Social Work School 

525 West Redwood Street 

14 State Medical Examiner's Building 
1 1 1 Penn Street 



21 Western Health Center 
700 West Lombard Street 

23 Whitehurst Hall 

624 West Lombard Street 
2 405 West Redwood Street Building 

16 701 West Pratt Street Building 

1 1 University Health Center 
120 South Greene Street 



3 University of Maryland Professional Building 

419 West Redwood Street 
32 Veterans Affairs Medical Center 
Baltimore and Greene Streets 

Cultural and Civic Facilities 

46 Babe Ruth Birthplace-Baltimore Orioles Museum 

44 Lexington Market 

43 Market Center Post Office 

47 Old Saint Pauls Cemetery 

45 Oriole Park at Camden Yards 
34 Westminister Hall 



Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act Request 

The Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (Public Law 101-542), signed into federal law November 8, 1990, 
requires that the University of Maryland at Baltimore make readily available to its students and prospective students the 
information listed below. 



Should you wish to obtain any of this information, please check the appropriate 
and UMAB school name, tear off this form and send it to: 

University Office of Student Affairs 
Attn: Student Right-to-Know Request 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 
Suite 336, Baltimore Student Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, MD 21201 



>), fill in your name, mailing address 



Cemi 



Financial Aid 

Costs of Attending the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
Refund Policy 

Facilities and Services for Handicapped 
Procedures for Review of School and Campus Accreditation 
Completion/Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students 
Loan Deferral under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer Services Act 
. Campus Safety and Security 
Campus Crime Statistics 



UMAB School and Program 



L 



J 



Academic Calendar 



1992-93 



1993-94 



August 24-25 

Freshman orientation 
August 26 

First semester begins - dentistry 
September 7 

Labor Day (school closed) 
September 8 

First semester begins - dental hygiene 
November 26-27 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 16-23 

Exam week 
December 24-January 1, 1993 

Christmas recess 
January 4-22 

Minimester 
January 18 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (school closed) 
January 25 

Second semester begins 
March 15-19 

Spring vacation 
May 14-20 

Exam week 
May 2 1 

Commencement 



August 23-24 

Freshman orientation 
August 25 

First semester begins - dentistry 
September 6 

Labor Day (school closed) 
September 7 

First semester begins - dental hygiene 
November 25-26 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 15-22 

Exam week 
December 23-January 3, 1994 

Christmas recess 
January 3-21 

Minimester 
January 17 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (school closed) 
January 24 

Second semester begins 
March 14-18 

Spring vacation 
May 13-19 

Exam week 
May 20 

Commencement 



These schedules are subject to change, and are pro- 
vided only for general information concerning the 
length of terms and holidays . 



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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 




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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ATBALTIMORE 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 
666 West Baltimore Street 
Baltimore, MD 21201 



The University of Maryland at Baltimore is accredited by the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Schoob. The Dental School is 
accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental 
Auxiliary Educational Programs of the Council on Dental Education 
of the American Dental Association. 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to be administered, and no less important, 
human relationships developed between teachers and students and between students 
and patients. If ever patients are regarded as clinical material, this building will have 
been degraded and its use corrupted. We must never forget that the word patient comes 
from the Latin root which means to suffer. Clinical material does not suffer. Human 
beings do." 

From the address of Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 
Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Regents 
University of Maryland 
Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall 
March 5, 1971 



Contents 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Philosophy 
The School 
The Campus 
The City 

THE DENTAL PROGRAM 

Application/ Admission 
Academic Policies and Programs 
Requirements for Graduation 
Employment Opportunities in Dentistry 
The Dental Curriculum 
Departments/Programs 





FINANCIAL AID 




4 
4 
6 


University Grants 
Endowment and Loan Funds 


60 
60 


8 


ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




9 
11 


Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

University of Maryland System 


62 

74 
74 


13 
13 


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


75 


14 
14 


POLICY STATEMENTS 


76 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS 

General Information 22 
Preprofessional/Professional 

Baccalaureate Program 22 

Two- and Three-Year Professional Curricula 23 

Degree Completion Baccalaureate Program 26 



MAPS 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 



Application/ Admission 
Specialty Programs 
General Dentistry Programs 
Graduate Programs 
Continuing Dental Education 

STUDENT LIFE 

Student Services 
Student Policies 
Publications/Organizations/ Awards 

MATRICULATION POLICIES AND 
PROCEDURES 

Registration Procedures 
Determination of In-State Status 
Tuition and Fees 
Student Expenses 
Official University Records 
Student Health Requirements 




CONTENTS .3 



General Information 




PHILOSOPHY 

Since its origin in 1840, the dental profession has 
exhibited a commitment to innovation. With con- 
tinual refinement in clinical procedures and an im- 
proved understanding of human biology, the profes- 
sion has been able to improve and expand its 
delivery of services. Populations previously un- 
served — the handicapped, medically compromised, 
hospitalized — not only are being treated but also are 
benefitting, as is the population at large, from im- 
proved materials and technology. 

The Dental School's programs focus on the 
three basic aims of the academic community — 
teaching, research and service. As a university dis- 
cipline, dental education must meet and surpass its 
previous accomplishments to ensure the continued 
advancement of dentistry. While the process of ed- 
ucation must remain anchored firmly to time- 
tested principles, it must also continually extend it- 
self to uncover hidden truths within these same 
principles and thereby contribute to man's progress 
toward better understanding and control of the 
environment. 

THE SCHOOL 

History 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore has 
the distinction of being the first dental college in 
the world. Formal education to prepare students for 
the practice of dentistry originated in 1840 with the 
establishment of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. The chartering of the school by the Gen- 
eral Assembly of Maryland on February 1, 1840 rep- 
resented the culmination of the efforts of Dr. Ho- 
race H. Hayden and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, two 
dental practitioners who recognized the need for 
systematic fonnal education as the foundation for a 
scientific and serviceable dental profession. To- 
gether they played a major role in establishing and 
promoting formal dental education, and in the de- 
velopment of dentistry as a profession. 

Convinced that support for a formal course in 
dental education would not come from medical 
school faculty, Dr. Hayden undertook the establish- 
ment of an independent dental college. Dr. Harris, 
an energetic and ambitious young man who had 
come to Baltimore in 18^0 to study under Dr. Hay- 



den, joined his mentor in the effort to found the 
college. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery served 
as a prototype for dental schools gradually estab- 
lished in other American cities and originated the 
pattern of modern dental education, with equal em- 
phasis on sound knowledge of general medicine and 
development of the skills of dentistry. Through its 
contributions to dental and medical progress and 
through the prominent role of its faculty and gradu- 
ates in the development of the profession, the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery has exerted a re- 
markable influence on professional dentistry. 

The present dental school evolved through a 
series of consolidations involving the Maryland 
Dental College, which merged with the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery in 1878; the Dental De- 
partment of the University of Maryland, founded in 
1882; and the Dental Department of the Baltimore 
Medical College, which merged with the University 
of Maryland Dental Department in 1913. The final 
consolidation took place in 1923, when the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University 
of Maryland Dental School were combined to cre- 
ate a distinct department of the university under 
state supervision and control. In 1970 the Dental 
School moved into Hayden-Harris Hall, a new five- 
story building with modern equipment and treat- 
ment facilities. In 1990 the school's clinical facili- 
ties were renovated to provide a state-of-the-art 
environment for teaching and delivery of care. 

Programs of Study 

The Dental School today strives to offer the finest 
programs of dental education in the world. Contin- 
uing efforts are made to provide educational and 
training experiences consistent with evolving con- 
cepts and advances in the delivery of dental health 
care. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program, the school 
offers a baccalaureate program in dental hygiene 
designed to prepare students for careers in dental 
hygiene practice, education, management and re- 
search in private and public settings. Programs 
leading to a graduate degree in basic sciences, oral 
biology and oral pathology are also available, in- 
cluding combined D.D.S./Ph.D. programs. Gradu- 
ate programs are designed to prepare students for 
careers in academic dentistry or to supplement 
clinical training with knowledge of research meth- 



i • i ■ i i A I. SCHOOL 



ods. Research opportunities may be made available 
to dental students as well as to graduate and post- 
graduate students. 

Advanced dental education programs are offered 
in the specialty areas of endodontics, oral and max- 
illofacial surgery, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, 
periodontics and prosthodontics. Also offered are a 
school-based residency program in advanced gen- 
eral dentistry providing advanced level training in 
the practice of comprehensive general dentistry and 
a hospital-based general practice residency program 
through the Dental School and the University of 
Maryland Medical System. 

The Continuing Education Program offers an in- 
tegrated curriculum to meet the needs of health 
care professionals. Designed to refine diagnostic 
skills and update knowledge in technical and scien- 
tific areas, courses are conducted annually in special 
facilities designed for the continuing dental educa- 
tion program. 

In 1983 the Dental School opened the Center 
for the Study of Human Performance in Dentistry, a 
unique educational, research and treatment com- 
plex which is the only facility of its kind in the 
Western Hemisphere. It provides students and fac- 
ulty diverse opportunities for the study, utilization 
and evaluation of advanced concepts of dental edu- 
cation and care delivery, with a primary focus on 
human performance. Because of its potential as a 
model for universal application to the training of 
dental personnel, the World Health Organization 
has designated the Dental School a WHO Collabo- 
rating Center for the review and evaluation of per- 
formance simulation training systems in oral health 
care. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Den- 
tal School, University of Maryland at Baltimore 
continues to fulfill, through its graduates, the aspi- 
rations of its founders to provide scientifically 
trained professionals to serve the oral health care 
i of society. 



Student Body 

Three hundred seventy-six students were enrolled 
in the dental program in the 1993-94 academic 
year. Of these, 47 percent were female; 27 percent 
were minority. The first-year class represented a va- 
riety of undergraduate institutions across the coun- 
try. Students enrolled averaged 25 years of age, had 
a mean science grade point average of 2.93 and a 



mean cumulative grade point average of 3.00. The 
faculty presently numbers over 200 persons, includ- 
ing practitioners who teach at the school part-time. 



IVMIh - x ~^\^M^LSi 



Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of 
Dentistry 

Soon after the founding of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery as the world's first dental school in 
1840, the college established its own museum 
which it has continued to this day. Because of the 
city's several historic connections to dentistry, Bal- 
timore was selected by the American Academy of 
the History of Dentistry as the site for dentistry's 
national museum, a project endorsed by the Ameri- 
can Dental Association and supported in part by a 
$1 million gift from Dr. Samuel D. Harris of 
Detroit, a retired pediatric dentist for whom the 
new museum is named. In 1996, following the com- 
pletion of a national fund-raising campaign, the 
enlarged museum will move into its own building 
which was constructed originally in 1904 as 
the home of the University of Maryland Dental 
Department. 

The highlights of the museum collection are 
George Washington's lower denture and the instru- 
ments used to treat Queen Victoria, but the collec- 
tion contains many other examples documenting 
the evolution of dental prostheses. The extensive 
collection of artifacts and specimens of historical 
and professional interest also includes the earliest 
surviving dental instruments brought to America. 
An important collection of chairs and cabinets 
trace the evolution of the dental office. Selected ob- 



GENERAL INFORMATION'S 



jects from the collection are temporarily displayed 
in the Independent Learning Center on the ground 
floor of Hayden- Harris Hall and can be seen Mon- 
day-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. except for 
school holidays. 

The new museum, which will be easily accessible 
to tourists visiting Baltimore's Inner Harbor, is de- 
signed to be a lively museum where people of all 
ages can learn about the history of oral health and 
preventive care; where scholars can study the evo- 
lution of dentistry; and where dentists can take 
pride in their profession and its accomplishments. 
For further information about the museum call 
(410) 706-6177 or (410) 706-8314. 

Special Lectures 

The Stephen E. and Jeffrey A. Kleiman Lectures in 
Dentistry and Medicine. As a tribute to the selection 
of careers in the health professions by his sons, 
Dr. Bernard S. Kleiman established this annual lec- 
ture program to alternate between the University of 
Maryland Dental School and the School of Medi- 
cine. Distinguished individuals are invited to lec- 
ture on topics pertinent and applicable to practicing 
dentists or physicians. The Kleiman Lecture alter- 
nates with the Toomey Lecture as part of Student- 
Faculty Day activities. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell Lecture. In 
1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. William B. and Eliza- 
beth S. Powell, presented the school with a gener- 
ous contribution for the purpose of instituting spe- 
cial lectures for the benefit of the student body and 
faculty. The first lecture in the series was presented 
in April 1966. Recently this lectureship was en- 
dowed by the Powells as a means of continuing to 
enrich the total academic program. 

The jane Boswell Toomey and Lewis Cole Toomey, 
D.D.S. Memorial Lecture. Endowed in 1982 by a 
major gift from the Toomey family, together with 
contributions by friends and associates of Dr. and 
Mrs. Toomey, this biennial lecture was initiated 
during the 1985-86 academic year. The Toomey 
Lecture provides a forum for distinguished individu- 
als to speak on timely dental research and clinical 
topics useful to dental professionals in practice and 
teaching. The lectures are open to all members of 
the dental community. 

In addition to these annual lectures, there are 
three special lectures which are presented on a 
rotating basis once every three years as part ol 



the Commencement/Alumni Week activities: The 
John E. Fogarty Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the 
Rhode Island Section of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery Alumni Association; The Hayden- 
Harris Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Alumni 
Association; and The J. Ben Robinson Memorial 
Lecture, sponsored by the Maryland Section of the 
American College of Dentists. 

THE CAMPUS 

The Dental School is an integral part of this campus 
for the professions. Located on 32 acres in down- 
town Baltimore, the campus began in 1807 with the 
founding of the School of Medicine. In 1840 it was 




joined by the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
and today these two schools share the campus with 
the Schools of Law, Nursing, Pharmacy, Social 
Work; an interprofessional Graduate School; and 
the University of Maryland Medical System. Some 
5,000 students attend the seven schools and three 
allied health programs on this campus, which is one 
of the first centers for professional education in the 
country. 

The university educates a majority of the re- 
gion's health care, legal and social service practi- 
tioners. Admission is very competitive, with more 
than five applicants for each first-year place. 

New partnerships among university components 
and with the University of Maryland Medical Cen- 
ter and new Veterans Affairs Medical Center are 
strengthening interdisciplinary endeavors in both 
research and teaching. The location, within the 



6 . DENTAL SCHOOL 



Baltimore- Washington-Annapolis triangle, maxi- 
mizes opportunities for collaboration with govern- 
ment agencies, health care institutions and life 
sciences industries. 



Information Services 

Computer Resources. Computing support for fac- 
ulty, staff and students is provided for microcom- 
puter, work station and mainframe computer users 
by Academic Computing/Health Informatics 
(ACHI) and by the Computing and Instructional 
Development Services (CIDS). Both are units of 
UMAB's Information Services (IS). CIDS is part of 
the Health Sciences Library's (HSL) Information 
and Instructional Services. 

UMAB students and faculty are able to use IS re- 
sources at each step in their research, learning, and 
teaching; this may include data collection, results 
anaylsis and document preparation, including desk- 
top publishing, color printing and preparation of 
overheads or color slides. Free electronic mail ac- 
counts enable the UMAB community to exchange 
notes, files and documents with others at the uni- 
versity and internationally via either BITNET or 
Internet. Access to many campus information 
sources and the Internet is provided through a cam- 
pus gopher server named UMABNET. Microcom- 
puters are located in several Technology Assisted 
Learning (TAL) centers and in user areas in both 
the IS building (100 North Greene Street) and the 
HSL (111 South Greene Street). Centrally located 
systems in IS and HSL are accessible via the campus 
ethernet and by dial-up modems from either office 
or home. TAL Centers are available for use by the 
campus community and for application pro'gram 
training. 

CIDS and ACHI supports training that ranges 
from microcomputer literacy and microcomputer 
boot camp to more advanced classes for word pro- 
cessing, graphics, desktop publishing, multimedia 
and statistical application programs. Training for 
access to the Internet, network resources, and 
e-mail packages is also available. For information, 
call 706-HELP. 



The Health Sciences Library 

The Health Sciences Library is distinguished as the 
first library established by a medical school in the 
United States, and is a recognized leader in state- 
of-the art information technology. The Health 
Sciences Library is the regional medical library for 



10 southeastern states, the District of Columbia, 
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, as part of the 
biomedical information network of the National Li- 
brary of Medicine. 

Serving all schools on campus and UMMS, the 
library contains more than 300,000 volumes, in- 
cluding 2,900 current journal titles, and is ranked in 
size among the top 25 health sciences libraries in 
the country. 

The library's online catalog allows you to look 
for materials by title, author, subject, keyword, call 
number, series, meeting and organization name. In 
addition to giving information on library holdings, 
the system can determine whether the material has 
been checked out of the library. The online catalog 
can be accessed from any computer terminal on the 
UMAB campus that is linked to the campus net- 
work, or from any dial access terminal. 

The library supports several computerized search 
services: 

CD-ROM LAN— Available in the Health Sci- 
ences Library and through the campus network, the 
LAN contains the following databases: IPA (Inter- 
national Pharmaceutical Abstracts), Bioethicsline, 
HAPI (Health and Psychosocial Instruments), 
PsycLIT (database of psychological literature from 
the last 17 years), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to 
Nursing and Allied Health Literature), SWAB (so- 
cial work abstracts), MicroCat (Maryland Union 
List of book/journal materials), Computer Select 
(information, including full text of articles, con- 
cerning computers), VICTOR (University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore online catalog) and Books in 
Print. 

HSL Current Contents — recent citations from 
sections of the print Current Contents publications 
(Life Sciences; Clinical Medicine, Physical Sci- 
ences, Social and Behavioral Sciences and Engi- 
neering). 

MaryMed Plus — User-friendly access to the full 
Medline database. It is available for use in the li- 
brary, through dial-in or over the campus network. 
Free passwords are available for students. 

Mediated Searching Service — Working with 
users, database searches are conducted by trained 
information specialists who have access to over 200 
databases. 

Micromedex CCIS — The Current Clinical In- 
formation Service provides full-text drug and clini- 
cal care information. This database is available in 
the Health Sciences Library and through dial- in or 
network access across the campus. 




GENERAL INFORMATION •? 



An information specialist can help you deter- 
mine which services best meet your needs. A con- 
sultation service is also available to help with re- 
search projects. Throughout the year, a series of 
seminars are offered to acquaint students, faculty 
and staff with databases, services and information 
access and management possibilities. 

THE CITY 



In addition to professional opportunities, the city of 
Baltimore, 13th largest in the nation, offers a stimu- 
lating environment in which to live and study. 
Having been the location of many significant 
events in the nation's history, including the writing 
of the national anthem, the city maintains a strong 
feeling for the past as typified by the many charm- 
ing neighborhoods of restored houses and abun- 
dance of historic buildings. Baltimore combines the 
sophistication of a large metropolitan city with easy 
accessibility to surrounding mountains, beaches and 
rural areas. 

Several blocks from campus is the nationally ac- 
claimed Inner Harbor area, where Harborplace, the 
National Aquarium, the Maryland Science Center 
and office buildings share an attractive waterfront 
with sailboats, hotels, restaurants and renovated 
townhouses. Connecting the downtown area to the 
outskirts of the city is the Baltimore Metro subway 
system, the first leg of an anticipated citywide 
subway system, and a recently completed light rail 
system. 

As a cultural center, Baltimore has offerings to 
please the most discriminating, including a world- 
class symphony orchestra, many fine museums, li- 
braries and professional theater groups. For sports 
fans, Baltimore features a new baseball stadium 
within walking distance of the campus, as well as 
professional soccer, CFL football, collegiate and 
club lacrosse and the nationally acclaimed Preak- 
ness. Nearby, the Chesapeake Bay offers unparal- 
leled water sports and the seafood for which the re- 
gion is famous. 




•i IAL SCHOOL 



The Dental Program 



APPLICATION/ADMISSION 

Requirements for Admission to the Dental 
Program 

The Dental School seeks to enroll the highest cal- 
iber of students who will become exemplary health 
care professionals. Quality is the preeminent crite- 
rion in the recruitment and admissions process. The 
Dental School has established admission criteria 
which pemnit flexibility in the choice of an under- 
graduate program while remaining discriminative 
with regard to scholastic achievement. Students 
who are majoring in either science or non-science 
disciplines are encouraged to apply. In addition, 
those individuals who are interested in changing 
their careers will be seriously considered in the ad- 
missions process, the goal of which is to identify ap- 
plicants who possess the ability to think critically 
and who have demonstrated independence and self- 
direction. 

Applicants to the dental program must success- 
fully complete at least three academic years (90 
credit hours) in an accredited university. The un- 
dergraduate curriculum must include, at a mini- 
mum, eight semester hours each of general biology 
and inorganic chemistry, including laboratories. 
Persons who seek admission under the minimum re- 
quirements are expected to achieve superior grades 
in prerequisite courses, for these courses best predict 
performance in the biological sciences of the dental 
curriculum. 

Non-science as well as science majors are en- 
couraged to apply. Applicants should be able to 
show evidence that they have undertaken a chal- 
lenging program in their respective disciplines, sup- 
plemented by a broad selection of courses in the so- 
cial sciences, humanities and arts. Experience in the 
development of fine manual dexterity is strongly 
recommended. Applicants are expected to have 
knowledge of the nature of the profession acquired 
through observation of dental practice and by read- 
ing appropriate literature. The office of admissions 
and student affairs reserves the right to modify the 
prerequisites when additional courses are necessary 
to improve an applicant's preparation for dental 
school. 

No more than 60 of the minimum required cred- 
its will be accepted from a junior college; these 
credits must have been validated by an accredited 
college of arts and sciences. All admission require- 
ments must be completed by June 30 prior to the 



desired date of admission. Applicants must also pre- 
sent favorable recommendations from their respec- 
tive predental committee or, if no such committee 
is available, from one instructor each in the depart- 
ments of biology and chemistry. In all other re- 
spects, applicants must give every promise of be- 
coming successful students and dentists of high 
standing. Applicants will not be admitted with un- 
absolved conditions or unabsolved failures. 




The admission decision will be based upon per- 
formance in previous academic programs, the qual- 
ity of those programs, and personal factors, as 
evidenced by letters of recommendation, extracur- 
ricular activities and a personal interview. Mary- 
land residents should have science and cumulative 
grade point average (GPA) values of 2.5 or higher 
to be competitive for admission; nonresidents 
should have GPA values of 3.0 or higher. All appli- 
cants are encouraged to take the Dental Admissions 
Test (DAT) no later than October of the year prior 
to admission. 

A pamphlet describing the test and an applica- 
tion to take the test will be sent to the applicant 
upon request to the Dental School's office of admis- 
sions and student affairs. The pamphlet lists the 
dates of the tests (given in April and October) and 
the location of testing centers throughout the 
United States, its possessions and Canada. Candi- 
dates should have scores of 15 or higher in the Total 
Science, Academic Average and the Perceptual 
Ability sections in order to be competitive. The 
DAT will be used as an adjunct to the applicant's 
educational credentials to assess potential admissi- 
bility. Applicants with relatively lower science 
GPAs should present with a strong performance on 
the DAT in order to be competitive. 



THE DENTAL PROGRAMS 




Prior to applying to the Dental School, potential 
applicants should note the University of Maryland 
at Baltimore policy concerning prevention and 
management of student and employee infection 
with bloodborne pathogens, page 76. In addition, 
while the admissions process does not include ques- 
tions concerning any prior criminal activity, indi- 
viduals who may have had a prior or subsequent 
conviction or nob contendre plea for a felony may 
encounter denial or removal of licensure. 



Residency 

Information on the regulations for the determina- 
tion of resident status may be obtained from the of- 
fice of records and registration, 62 1 West Lombard 
Street, Room 326, University of Maryland at Balti- 
more, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



Application and Acceptance Procedures 

Students are admitted only at the beginning of the 
fall semester in August. All applications are 
processed through the American Association of 
Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS). 
An AADSAS application request card is available 
to applicants after June 1 of the year prior to the de- 
sired date of admission upon request to the office of 
admissions and student affairs of the Dental School. 
The AADSAS application must be filed by all ap- 
plicants prior to March 1 ; early filing of the application 
is strongly recommended. AADSAS will duplicate 
the transcript, calculate the grade point average of 
each applicant, and furnish pertinent information 
to the Dental School. 

If the requirements for admission are fulfilled 
and preliminary admission criteria are met, the ap- 
plicant will receive the Dental School's application 
form, which should be completed and mailed with 
the application fee to the Dental School's office of 
admissions and student affairs. If receipt of the ap- 
plication and application fee is not acknowledged 
within 10 days, the applicant should contact the ad- 
missions office. All applicants who are seriously 
being considered will be interviewed; a personal in- 
terview does not, however, guarantee admission. 
The Admissions Committee, composed of members 
of the faculty, students and alumni, selects qualified 
applicants for admission based on the applicant's 
academic performance, DAT scores, personal rec- 
ommendations and the personal interview. A 
deposit of $200 must accompany an applicant's ac- 



ceptance of an offer of admission. It will be credited 
toward the applicant's tuition and is non-refund- 
able. An additional $100 deposit is due by June 1 to 
confirm intent to enroll. Admission is contingent 
upon continued satisfactory academic performance 
and behavior during the period between acceptance 
and enrollment. Admission requirements are sub- 
ject to change without prior notice. 



Admission with Advanced Standing 

Students currently attending dental schools in the 
United States and graduates of dental schools in 
other countries may apply for admission with ad- 
vanced standing. It should be noted, however, that 
such admissions occur very rarely because of limited 
space availability or incompatibility of curricula at 
different schools. Students admitted with advanced 
standing may be exempted from certain courses by 
passing a competency examination. Any person in- 
terested in admission with advanced standing 
should contact the Dental School's office of admis- 
sions and student affairs for specific information 
about requirements and to request an application 
form. 



Readmission to Dental School Programs 

Following dismissal for academic failure (excluding 
academic misconduct), readmission may be sought 
by reapplication to the Dental School through the 
office of admissions and student affairs. All requests 
for reapplication must follow the procedures as set 
forth in the catalog. 

Once the application has been processed by the 
office of admissions and student affairs and the ap- 
propriate admissions committee, readmission will 
be granted only after careful review of the student's 
academic record and assessment of potential for sat- 
isfactory progress in the future in consultation with 
the appropriate academic advancement committee. 
Recommendations on this application will be re- 
ferred to the office of admissions and student affairs 
for final decision and notification to the applicant. 
Decisions by the office of admissions and student af- 
fairs are not subject to appeal. 



UMES-UMAB Honors Program 

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore 
(UMES), in cooperation with the professional 
schools of the University of Maryland at Baltimore 



i . • i i I . i \ i C H O O ] 



(UMAB), instituted an Honors Program in an ef- 
fort to prepare students for professional school study 
while providing them with a sound liberal arts edu- 
cation at the same time. The Honors Program con- 
sists of honors sections in chemistry, biology, math- 
ematics, English and social science. It also 
emphasizes independent study, seminars and collo- 
quia through which students are expected to ex- 
plore in depth the various disciplines. Specific pre- 
professional tracks in allied health, dentistry, law, 
medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work are 
available. Upon successful completion of all re- 
quirements of the Honors Program, which include 
the professional school admission requirements, the 
Honors Program graduate will be admitted into the 
corresponding professional school on the UMAB 
campus during the year immediately following grad- 
uation from UMES. 

Admission into the Honors Program is deter- 
mined by the Honors Program Committee which is 
composed of representatives from UMES and each 
professional school at UMAB. A combination of 
predictive factors, such as SAT scores, interviews, 
letters of recommendation and a personal statement 
written at the time o{ the interview will be used to 
determine the eligibility of a student for admission 
into the Honors Program. The cumulative acade- 
mic performance of an applicant, as indicated by 
the high school record, will be assessed. For addi- 
tional information, write to the Honors Commit- 
tee, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess 
Anne, Maryland 21853. 

Combined Arts and Sciences/Dental Program 

Although the Dental School supports a coherent 
four-year program of undergraduate education for 
most students, it recognizes that some individuals 
may be prepared to enter after three years. The Uni- 
versity of Maryland College Park, University of 
Maryland Baltimore County, Bowie State College, 
Coppin State College, Morgan State University 
and Salisbury State College offer a combined cur- 
riculum leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The preprofes- 
sional part of this curriculum is taken in residence 
in the college of arts and sciences on any of the six 
campuses, and the professional part at the Dental 
School in Baltimore. Students who have been ap- 
proved for the combined program and who have 
completed the arts and sciences phase may, upon 



the recommendation of the dean of the Dental 
School, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence by the undergraduate college following the 
completion of the student's first year in the Dental 
School. Further information and applications may 
be obtained from the office of admissions at the re- 
spective undergraduate college. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 

In the evaluation of student performance, the fol- 
lowing letter grades are used: 

A - excellent 

B - good 

C - satisfactory 

D - below average 

E - conditional failure 

F - failure 

I - incomplete 

A failure must be absolved by repeating the en- 
tire course, in which case the original F grade re- 
mains on the student's permanent record, but only 
the new grade is used to compute the grade point 
average. 

A student whose performance is not satisfactory 
in one or more segments of a course or in some clin- 
ical procedures may receive an E grade which re- 
mains on the student record. This grade indicates 
that the student has failed to master a limited seg- 
ment of a course but may achieve a satisfactory level 
of proficiency within a short time if allowed to do so 
based upon overall academic performance. When 
the E grade is used as a temporary final grade it 
counts in the grade point average calculation. If 




THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



successful remediation occurs, the student will re- 
ceive the final grade earned in the course, which is 
shown on the permanent record along with the 
original E. An unresolved grade of E will result in a 
permanent grade of F. 

Students whose work in completed assignments 
is of acceptable quality but who, because of circum- 
stances beyond their control (such as illness or dis- 
ability), have been unable to complete course re- 
quirements will receive a grade of Incomplete. 
When all requirements have been satisfied, students 
will receive the final grade earned in the course. Ex- 
cept under extraordinary circumstances, an Incom- 
plete may not be carried into the next academic 
year. 

Since performance at the D level is unacceptable 
in the clinical sciences, the D grade is not used by 
the clinical departments. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of 
credits assigned to each course and the following 
numerical values for grades: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-l, 
E-0, F-0. The grade point average is the sum of the 
products of course credits and grade values, divided 
by the total number of course credits in that year of 
the curriculum. 

The performance of each student is reviewed at 
the end of each semester by the appropriate ad- 
vancement committee. The committee determines, 
on the basis of progress and/or final grades, whether 
the student is progressing satisfactorily or if remedi- 
ation or assignment to a special program (first- or 
second-year students only) is warranted. 

Students assigned to a special program are placed 
under the supervision of the Special Academic Pro- 
grams Committee, which tailors a program to the 
needs and abilities of each student and reviews 
progress, recommends remediation, determines ad- 
vancement or recommends dismissal on the basis 
of progress and/or final grades at the end of each 
semester. 

All first- and second-year students must have 
completed satisfactorily the first two years of the 
curriculum before advancement into the regular 
third-year curriculum is approved. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point average 
and passing grades in all courses in order to advance 
unconditionally to the next year. Conditional ad- 
vancement may be assigned to third-year students 
who have not successfully completed all courses but 
who, in the judgment of the advancement commit- 
tee, should be afforded the opportunity to complete 



third-year requirements while proceeding with 
fourth-year courses. Probationary advancement may 
be assigned to students in the following categories: 

1. First- and second-year students who obtain a 
grade point average of 1.70-1.99 and have pass- 
ing grades in all courses. 

2. Third-year students who obtain a grade point av- 
erage of 1.85-1.99 in third-year courses and pass- 
ing grades in all courses. 

A student placed on probationary status must 
achieve a minimum 2.0 average and pass all courses 
taken during the probationary academic year. Fail- 
ure to do so will result in dismissal from the dental 
program subject to discretionary review by the Fac- 
ulty Council. 

A student may be permitted to absolve deficien- 
cies during the summer session, as recommended by 
the appropriate advancement committee. Depend- 
ing on the type of deficiencies involved, students 
may be required to register and pay a fee for the 
summer session. Students with deficiencies too se- 
vere to be absolved during the summer session may 
be afforded the opportunity to repeat or remediate a 
specific year of the dental program. Remediation of 
the year provides students who would otherwise 
have to repeat the year's work in its entirety with 
the opportunity for exemption from courses or por- 
tions of courses at the discretion of the department 
chairman. Students who are repeating or remediat- 
ing any year of the dental program are placed on 
probation. 

If it is determined that a student is progressing so 
poorly that remediation will not bring him/her to a 
passing level, dismissal will be recommended to the 
Faculty Council. 

The appropriate advancement committee deter- 
mines for each student either unconditional ad- 
vancement, conditional or probationary advance- 
ment, repeat or remediation of the year, or 
recommends academic dismissal to the Faculty 
Council, which approves all decisions pertaining to 
dismissal or graduation. A student may appeal any 
action of an advancement committee or the Faculty 
Council by submission of a written request to the 
dean. 

Specially Tailored Educational Program 

The Specially Tailored Educational Program 
(STEP) functions within the framework of the reg- 
ular curriculum but allows students to spend up to 



12 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



three years completing first- and second-year 
courses. The program was developed for students 
who, because of academic difficulty, illness or other 
circumstances, need special assistance and/or addi- 
tional time to fulfill the academic requirements. It 
also accommodates the specific program needs of 
students transferring from other institutions. 

The First and Second Year Advancement Com- 
mittees may offer a student the option of STEP or 
assign to STEP any student whose progress is unsat- 
isfactory if it is generally agreed that a reduced load 
and/or special tutorial assistance may improve the 
student's chance of successfully completing course 
requirements. Students assigned to STEP are placed 
under the supervision of the Special Academic Pro- 
grams Committee, which plans an individualized 
program for each student and carefully monitors 
progress. Departmental counselors in the basic sci- 
ences and preclinical sciences are available to assist 
any student assigned to STEP. 

Students may advance into the regular program 
when they have demonstrated satisfactory progress; 
otherwise they remain in STEP until they have 
completed all first- and second-year courses. Once 
the student advances into the regular program, aca- 
demic progress is evaluated by the appropriate ad- 
vancement committee. 



Attendance Policy 

The faculty and administration of the Dental 
School expect every student to attend all scheduled 
lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and clinic 
assignments, except in the event of illness or emer- 
gency. Students may lose the opportunity for re- 
mediation if they do not meet published depart- 
mental/course standards for attendance. Excused 
absences must be reported to the office of admis- 
sions and student affairs so that departments may be 
advised to offer assistance upon the student's return. 

The Minimester 

In the January minimester, students in all years of 
the dental program may choose to take elective 
courses when required courses are not scheduled. 
The clinic continues to operate on the usual sched- 
ule during the minimester. Any credit awarded for 
minimester elective courses will not be applied to 
the D.D.S. degree. 



Undergraduate students contemplating a career 
in dentistry may attend this session on a per-course 
basis. Information concerning course offerings is 
distributed to prospective students by the office of 
admissions and student affairs and to all enrolled 
students by the office of academic affairs. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred 
upon a candidate who has met the conditions speci- 
fied below: 

1 . A candidate must have satisfied all requirements 
of the various departments. 

2. A candidate must pass all fourth-year courses 
and achieve a minimum 2.0 average in the 
fourth year. 

3. The candidate must have paid all debts to the 
university prior to graduation. 

Qraduation Dates 

Students who enter the D.D.S. program at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Dental School are required to 
complete a minimum of four academic years at the 
school. The length of the program has been estab- 
lished in order to provide for the students a compre- 
hensive professional education. Graduation for stu- 
dents who complete the program within this 
prescribed period is in May. Students who fail to 
complete all requirements in May may be consid- 
ered for graduation the following July, January or 
May, as they are judged ready to do so. 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN 
DENTISTRY 

The public demand for more and better oral health 
care will continue to create a climate for growth in 
the dental profession. Technological advances and 
changing demographics have spawned a wider 
range of career options within dentistry. Income 
levels are contingent upon and affected by the area 
served, the practice specialty, and the state of the 
economy at the time. 




THE DENTAL PROG RAM. 13 



THE DENTAL CURRICULUM 



YEAR I 



SUBJECT 






CREDIT 






Semester 
I 2 


Total 


Anatomy 




13 




13 


Biochemistry- 




5 




5 


Conjoint Sciences I 






3 


3 


Dental Biomaterials I 




1 


1 


2 


Microbiology 






5 


5 


Physiology 






5 


5 


Oral and Maxillofacif 


1 Surgery 




1 


1 


Dental Anatomy/Occ 


lusion 


4 




4 


Operative Dentistry 






5 


5 


Oral Health Care De 


ivery 


1 


2 


3 


Periodontics 




1 


1 


2 



YEAR III 

SUBJECT 



CREDIT 





Semester 

1 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences III 


2 


2 


4 


Endodontics 




4 


4 


Fixed Prosthodontics 


3 


3 


6 


Operative Dentistry 


3 


4 


7 


Oral Health Care Delivery 


3 


3 


6 


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 


2 


1 


3 


Oral Medicine and 
Diagnostic Sciences 


4 


3 


7 


Orthodontics 


1 


1 


2 


Pediatric Dentistry 


4 


4 


8 


Periodontics 


6 


5 


11 


Removable Prosthodontics 


4 


4 


8 



32 34 



66 



25 23 



48 



YEAR IV 



YEAR II 

SUBJECT 



CREDIT 





Semester 
I 2 


Total 


Biomedicine 


5 


7 


12 


Conjoint Sciences II 


6 


6 


12 


Dental Biomaterials II 11 


Oral Health Care Delivery 


1 


2 


3 


Pediatric Dentistry 1 1 


Pharmacology 


5 




5 


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 1 1 


Endodontics 1 1 


Fixed Prosthodontics 


3 


3 


6 


Orthodontics 






1 


Periodontics 


1 




2 


Complete Dentures 


3 




3 


Removable Prosthodontics 




3 


3 



24 27 



SI 



SUBJECT 


CREDIT 


Semester 
I 2 Total 


Conjoint Sciences IV 


3 2 5 


Clinic 


29 30 59 



32 32 64 
Curriculum requirements are subject to change 
without prior notice. 

DEPARTMENTS/PROGRAMS 

CLERKSHIP PROQRAM 

Two elective clerkship programs allow selected 
fourth-year students to pursue further studies in de- 
partmental activities specially designed to meet 
their needs and interests. Students devote a portion 
of their clinic time to these specialized programs; 
the remaining clinic time is spent in the compre- 
hensive treatment of patients in the regular pro- 
gram. Clerkships are available in basic science and 
clinical disciplines and several incorporate off-cam- 
pus clinical experiences in various practice settings. 
DCJS 558. Clerkship I (elective) (20) 
DCJS 559. Clerkship II (elective) (10) 



M • HI : NTAL SCHOOL 



CLINICAL DENTISTRY 

Staff: All clinical departments 

The clinical education program is designed to pro- 
vide each student with a broad background of clini- 
cal experience based on the philosophy of preven- 
tion and comprehensive patient care. Although the 
need for the treatment of existing disease is of para- 
mount importance, the clinical program stresses 
long-term complete dental care founded on pre- 
venting the occurrence or recurrence of disease. 
Each student provides patient care in a general 
practice in a manner similar to practitioners in the 
community. Clinical areas for predoctoral instruc- 
tion are designated primarily for general practice 
teams. Clinical instruction is accomplished using 
dentist-managers, general dentists and specialists 
providing interdepartmental instruction for the stu- 
dent and the highest level of dental care for the pa- 
tient. The clinical program functions year round in 
order to provide continuity of patient care. 

CLINICAL SIMULATION 
Director: To be appointed 
Staff: All departments 

The clinical simulation program is a four-year com- 
prehensive program with the purpose of simulating 
the delivery of oral health care. It includes three 
components, all of which are of equal importance. 
The first provides the student with an awareness of 
the optimum utilization of the body in the perfor- 
mance of procedures. The second component pro- 
vides the student with the opportunity to apply the 
concepts of performance logic in the clinical simu- 
lation unit. The third component provides for the 
application of skills in the delivery of patient care in 
the clinic. Working in instructional settings that 
replicate the clinical setting, the dental student 
learns to deliver high quality care utilizing a process 
that includes attention to appropriate control of the 
operating environment. 

CONJOINT SCIENCES 
Director: Harold L. Crossley 
Staff: All departments 

Conjoint Sciences is the administrative unit re- 
sponsible for the coordination of subjects which are 
most appropriately presented in an interdisciplinary 
format. Certification for cardiopulmonary resuscita- 
tion (CPR) is required for each year. 



In the first year, lectures in Conjoint Sciences 
introduce the students to the history of dentistry, 
the epidemiology of chemical dependency, ethics 
and geriatric dentistry. 

Human growth and development, immunology, 
diagnosis and treatment of pulp and periapical dis- 
ease, cariology, clinical aspects of head and neck 
anatomy, geriatric dentistry and dental anesthesiol- 
ogy are subjects presented in the second year of 
Conjoint Sciences. Certification for blood pressure 
measurement is a required component of the pro- 
gram in the second year. 

The third year of Conjoint Sciences deals pri- 
marily with the management of clinical problems 
associated with the interdisciplinary topics previ- 
ously presented. Topics include dental management 
of the patient with special needs, therapeutics, gen- 
eral anesthesia, ethical dilemmas, geriatric dentistry 
and temporomandibular dysfunction. 

The curriculum in the fourth year includes lec- 
tures dealing with medical emergencies in the den- 
tal office and a wide range of selective courses. 
DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences I (3) 
DCJS 528. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 
DCJS 538. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 
DCJS 548. Conjoint Sciences IV (5) 

ENDODONTICS 

Chairman: Thomas C. Dumsha 

Associate Professor: Dumsha 

Clinical Associate Professors: Kelly, Schunick 

Assistant Professors: McDonald, Rauschenberger 

Dental School Assistant Professor: Cootauco 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Gamson, Hyson, 

Koch, Quarantillo, Waxman 

Clinical Instructors: Arita, Dermody, DiAndreth, 

Ellis, Parsons, Stanek 

The student's introduction to endodontics begins in 
the second year. It consists of a series of lectures, 
seminars, laboratories and patient simulations that 
stress both the fundamentals and biologic principles 
of endodontics. 

In the third year, lectures are presented which 
expand upon the basic material presented in the 
second year. Cases are treated clinically with the 
student demonstrating an acceptable level of com- 
petency by the completion of the third year. The 
fourth-year experience in endodontics is primarily 
clinical. Competency in clinical endodontics with 
more complex cases is expected of each student. A 




THE DENTAL PRO GRAM- IS 



clerkship program in advanced endodontics is avail- 
able to selected students in their fourth year. 

The department conducts research in dental 
traumatology, dental materials, endodontic surgery 
and immunology. 

ENDO 522. Principles of Pre-Clinical Endo- 
dontics ( 1 ) 

ENDO 538. Principles of Clinical Endodontics (4) 
ENDO 548. Endodontic Clinic (4) 




ORAL AND CRANIOFACIAL BIOLOQICAL 
SCIENCES 

Section Heads: Anatomy, Louis A. Benevento; 
Biochemistry/Pharmacology, Richard L. Wynn; Mi- 
crobiology, William A. Falkler, Jr.; Physiology, 
Leslie C. Costello 

Professors: Bashirelahi, Benevento, Chang, Cos- 
tello, Falkler, Franklin, Hawley, Krywolap, Minah, 
Thut 

Clinical Professor: Buxbaum 
Research Professors: Enwonwu 
Associate Professors: Capra, Crossley, Delisle, 
Dessem, Gartner, Hiatt, Meszler, Myslinski, Nau- 
man, Olson, Seibel, Sydiskis, Urbaitis, H. Williams 
Adjunct Professor: Birkedal-Hansen 
Adjunct Associate Professors: Chaudhari, Parente 
Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor: Hendler 
Assistant Professors: Bennett 
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor: Iglarsh 
Adjunct Faculty: Hollingcr, Sestokas 
Associate Staff: Groves, Kaur, Kelly, McCleary, 
Organ 

The department of oral and craniofacial biological 
sciences conducts educational and research pro- 
grams in basic biological si iences related to fbc oral 



and craniofacial region. It is responsible for the 
basic biological sciences curriculum in the dental, 
dental hygiene and advanced dental education pro- 
grams, as well as for graduate programs leading to 
the awarding of M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The Ph.D. degree programs conducted by the de- 
partment are in anatomy, biochemistry, physiology 
and microbiology. Master's degrees in those disci- 
plines as well as pharmacology and oral biology are 
available. 

A Ph.D. program in oral and craniofacial biology 
(and accompanying M.S.) is expected to be avail- 
able in the summer of 1995. Within this program 
the student may focus on one of three tracks: 1) 
craniofacial morphology and function (functional 
and developmental morphology of the orofacial re- 
gion, brain processes and underlying sensation and 
motor control); 2) oral molecular, cellular and sys- 
tems biology (biochemical, molecular, cellular 
processes related to craniofacial biology); or 
3) oral infectious disease (bacterial, viral or fungal 
diseases of the orofacial region, and immunology 
and pathogenetic mechanisms of such infectious 
disease). 

A D.D.S./Ph.D. combined program can be de- 
signed for interested and qualified students. 
Anatomy — The basic course in human anatomy is 
devoted to the study of the cells, tissues, organs and 
organ systems of the body using an interdisciplinary 
approach encompassing gross anatomy, neuro- 
anatomy, histology and developmental anatomy. 
Principles of body stmcture and function are studied 
with a particular emphasis on the head and neck 
and major organ systems. A strong effort is made to 
correlate the anatomy curriculum with other 
courses in the basic and clinical sciences of the den- 
tal curriculum. Anatomy conducts research and 
graduate training in neurophysiology, neuroanat- 
omy, craniofacial development and teratology, and 
gingival overgrowth in relation to drug therapy. 
Biochemistry/Pharmacology — As emphasized in 
this section, biochemistry is a study of cellular 
processes at the molecular level and the influences 
ot nutrition and pathologies on these processes. The 
teaching goals of this discipline are: to present a 
comprehensive course in biochemistry to the first- 
year students seeking a professional degree in den- 
tistry, and to provide a program of specialized train- 
ing for graduate students seeking an advanced 
graduate degree (M.S., Ph.D.) in preparation for a 
career in teaching and/or research. 



The course provided for dental students covers 
the major traditional subjects of biochemistry. Den- 
tal students who have previously taken a course in 
biochemistry may take a competency examination 
which, if passed satisfactorily, permits them to be 
excused from taking this course. 

Biochemistry is included in the Conjoint Sci- 
ences program, and current research projects in this 
discipline are concerned with the following sub- 
jects: isolation, characterization and immunogenic - 
ity of bacterial cell wall antigens and membrane gly- 
colipids; brain metabolism of amino acids and the 
neurological significance of their metabolites as po- 
tential neurotransmitters and/or modulators for 
neurotransmission; induction and regulation of en- 
zymes in amino acid catabolic pathways; study of 
the effects of environmental pollutant peroxisome 
proliferators on the central nervous system via the 
GABAergic system as well as on tooth develop- 
ment via peroxisomes localized in odontoblasts; ac- 
tion of steroid hormones on soluble intracellular cy- 
toplasmic or nuclei receptors; characterization of 
the structure/function of various steroid hormone 
receptors by chemically modifying sulfhydryl, 
amino, hydroxyl and tyrosyl groups; and study of os- 
teocalcin, a noncollagenous calcium binding pro- 
tein found in the organic matrix of bone dentin and 
other mineralized tissues. 

The program of instruction in pharmacology is 
divided into three phases. The first phase includes a 
thorough study of the basic concepts and principles 
in pharmacology. Emphasis is placed on the mecha- 
nisms of action, absorption, distribution, metabo- 
lism and excretion of drugs, therapeutic indications, 
common adverse reactions and drug interactions. 
The second phase teaches oral therapeutics, drug 
interactions and pain and anxiety control through 
the participation in the Conjoint Sciences program. 
The third phase, designed for graduate and postdoc- 
toral students, provides in-depth coverage of current 
topics in analgesia, local and general anesthesia, 
dental therapeutics and dental toxicology. The dis- 
cipline includes research and graduate training in 
neuropharmacology relating to analgesia, general 
anesthesia and skeletal muscle relaxants. 
Microbiology — The predoctoral program in this 
section is organized to supply students with the fun- 
damental principles of microbiology in order that 
they may understand the chemical and biological 
mechanisms of the production of disease by bacteria 
and other parasites, and the means by which the 



host protects itself against bacteria and related or- 
ganisms. The graduate programs leading toward the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy are designed to train students for positions in 
research and teaching, particularly in dental 
schools. Research is currently being conducted in 
oral microbiology (caries and periodontal diseases), 
pathogenic microbiology, immunology, virology, 
microbial genetics, microbial ecology, cytology and 
microbial physiology. 

Physiology — The basic principles of physiology are 
stressed in the predoctoral course to provide stu- 
dents with knowledge of the function of the princi- 
pal organ systems of the body. Dental-oriented as- 
pects of physiology are taught through participation 
in the Conjoint Sciences program. Courses for grad- 
uate and postgraduate students lead to the master's 
and doctoral degrees for students interested in ca- 
reers in teaching and research. The physiology sec- 
tion conducts research and graduate training in oral 
neurophysiology, craniofacial pain, cardiopul- 
monary physiology, endocrinology and reproduc- 
tion, and renal physiology. 
DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 
DBIC 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 
DPHR 521. General Pharmacology and Thera- 
peutics (5) 

DMIC 512. Microbiology (5) 
DPHS 512. Principles of Physiology (5) 

ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY 

Chairman: Leonard A. Cohen 

Professors: L. A. Cohen, Craig, Morganstein, 

Romberg 

Clinical Professors: Mecklenburg 

Associate Professors: Barnes, Belenky, Blank, 

Grace, Manski 

Dental School Associate Professors: Ailor, Gin- 

gell, Jones, Swanson, G. C. Williams 

Clinical Associate Professors: Beach, Bowman, 

Caplan, Christopher, Collins, Dana, M. Rekow 

Assistant Professors: Colangelo, Yellowitz 

Dental School Assistant Professors: Bauman, 

Creamer, Eldridge, W. Tewes, M. Wilson 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Barclay, Berning, 

Fedele, Goodman, Hyson, Imm, Levinson, Liggett, 

Schlank, Schmidt, Streckfus, Trail, Watson 

Instructor: Anderson 

Clinical Instructors: Allen, Bullock, Cunningham, 

Davis, Ebright, George, Koehler, Leight, Lennon, 



THE DENTAL PROORAM-17 




Robinson, Schiff, Shires, Silverman, Sim, L. Wil- 
liams, Witting, G. Wood 
Associate Staff: Copelan 

In its teaching, research and service activities, the 
department of oral health care delivery continually 
develops, evaluates and disseminates information 
and methods to meet the needs of the providers and 
recipients of oral health care. 

The major areas of teaching responsibility are: 
(1) behavioral sciences, (2) dental practice admin- 
istration, (3) dental delivery systems, (4) dental 
public health, (5) epidemiology and scientific liter- 
ature evaluation, (6) geriatric dentistry, (7) special 
patient care, (8) community-based oral health care, 
and (9) the clinical practice of dentistry utilizing 
human performance logic and appropriate auxiliary 
personnel. During the four-year curriculum, stu- 
dents attend department sponsored lectures, semi- 
nars, independent and small group projects, com- 
munity rotations and patient care clinics. 

The core curriculum includes the following top- 
ics: first year — oral health care issues, principles of 
epidemiology and review of scientific literature; sec- 
ond year — applied behavioral analysis, communica- 
tion, patient compliance, stress management, den- 
tal health education and community service 
project; third year — computer applications, ac- 
counting, finance, economics, law, marketing, 
taxes, practice and business planning, and Dental 
Practice Systems clinic; fourth year — dental prac- 
tice administration, Dental Practice Systems clinic, 
and community-based geriatric oral health. Lec- 
tures on geriatric dentistry occur in all four years of 
the curriculum in the Conjoint Sciences program. 
The third- and fourth-year Dental Practice Systems 
clinic program demonstrates delivery system alter- 
natives using human performance-centered er- 
gonomics, behavioral and modern practice adminis- 
tration concepts. The department supports the 
dental school's comprehensive care program 
through the clinical and managerial support it pro- 
vides the general practices. Additionally, students 
participate in a variety of volunteer and required 
community experiences during each year of the 
dental school program. 

In addition, lectures on the nature of handicap' 
ping and medically compromising conditions and 
their effects on the patient are presented in the first 
three years of the curriculum. During the third and 
fourth year of this special patient program, students 



are the primary providers for physically disabled and 
mentally handicapped individuals and those with 
special medical conditions or infectious diseases. 
All clinical care is provided in special facilities de- 
signed and operated for the delivery of dental care 
to handicapped and medically compromised indi- 
viduals of all ages. 

The department conducts research in dental ma- 
terials, clinical trials, practice administration, qual- 
ity assurance, behavioral sciences, geriatric den- 
tistry, dental delivery systems and oral health policy. 
OHCD 518. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 528. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 538. Oral Health Care Delivery (6) 
OHCD 548. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 



ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURQERY 

Chairman: James R. Hupp 

Professors: Bergman, DeVore, Gaston, Hupp, 

Tilghman 

Associate Professors: Ord, Richter 

Assistant Professor: Horswell 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Di Fabio, Exler, 

Goldbeck, Kogan, Lauttman, Marano, Nessif, 

Raksin, Stavropoulos 

In the first year students are introduced to oral and 
maxillofacial surgery with lectures on the manage- 
ment of medical emergencies. Introductory material 
on minor oral and maxillofacial surgery, and lec- 
tures and demonstrations in local anesthesia are 
presented during the second year. 

Third- and fourth-year lectures cover all phases 
of oral and maxillofacial surgery and advanced pain 
and anxiety control. Students are rotated to the 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in block as- 
signments during the third and fourth years for pro- 
gressive participation in oral surgery procedures. 

Fourth-year students are scheduled on block as- 
signments to the hospital for hospital dentistry, op- 
erating room experience and general anesthesia ex- 
perience; they also take night calls with the oral 
and maxillofacial surgery and general practice resi- 
dents. 

The department participates in all years of the 
Conjoint Sciences program concentrating in the 
fourth year on recognition and management of 
medical emergencies in the dental office. Research 
is conducted in the evaluation of non-steroidal 
analgesics for postsurgical pain control, on the im- 
munologic response of tumor cells in animals, and 



18* DENTAL Si HOOl 



on hone healing in cooperative studies with 
MIEMSS orthopedic surgery service. 
DSUR 512. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (1) 
DSUR 522. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (1) 
DSUR 538. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (3) 
DSUR 548. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (6) 

ORAL MEDICINE AND DIAGNOSTIC 

SCIENCES 

Chairman: C. Daniel Overholser 

Professors: Hasler, Overholser 

Associate Professors: DePaola, Meiller, J. Park, M. 

Siegel 

Dental School Associate Professor: Brown, G. H. 

Williams 

Clinical Associate Professor: Freedman 

Assistant Professor: Balciunas, Crooks 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Garber, Lee, Van- 

dermer, Weiner 

Clinical Instructors: Blaik, Brooks, Dailey, Katz, 

Kreiner, Manson, Meeks, Palmer, Pannehaker, Pol- 

haus, Saedi, Shafinouri 

The curriculum in oral medicine and diagnosis in- 
cludes the basic principles of the patient interview, 
the fundamentals of physical examination, recogni- 
tion of oral disease, treatment planning, manage- 
ment of patients with oral and/or systemic disease 
and management of dental emergencies. 

Principles of biomedicine, an interdisciplinary 
course taught in conjunction with the department 
of oral pathology, introduces the second-year stu- 
dent to oral medicine through didactic presenta- 
tions concerning the patient interview, clinical ex- 
amination, oral radiology and treatment planning. 
Clinical aspects of the course are taught in the sec- 
ond, third and fourth years. 

Principles of oral medicine and diagnosis are 
taught in the third and fourth years clinically and 
didactically. These courses reinforce the concept 
that the dentist should receive adequate training in 
obtaining medical histories, performing appropriate 
physical examinations, interpreting the results of 
various laboratory tests and, most importantly, re- 
lating the physical status of the patient to the den- 
tal treatment plan. 

The department conducts research in dental 
management of medically compromised patients, 
prevention of infection in immuno-compromised 
patients, prevention of bacterial endocarditis, eval- 
uation of drugs to treat bacterial and fungal infec- 



tions of the oral cavity and the role of viruses in 
cancer and its treatment. 
DP AT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 
DIAG 538. Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sci- 
ences (7) 

DIAG 548. Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sci- 
ences (4) 



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ORAL PATHOLOGY 
Chairman: John J. Sauk 
Professor: Sauk 
Associate Professor: Levy 
Assistant Professor: Couwenhoven 
Associate Staff: Hebert 

The predoctoral teaching program consists of an in- 
terdisciplinary course that covers the basic princi- 
ples of pathology and medicine through presenta- 
tion of the morphologic, chemical and physiologic 
changes of basic disease processes and important 
specific diseases. Emphasis is placed on the diagno- 
sis, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifesta- 
tions of disease processes in the oral cavity. The aim 
is to provide a sound basis for the differential diag- 
nosis of oral lesions and a rationale for their treat- 
ment. The student is provided ample opportunity to 
develop proficiency in problem solving in oral diag- 
nosis. A variety of techniques for examination and 
diagnosis are covered, including dental radiography. 
The department presents courses for postgradu- 
ate students and offers graduate programs leading to 
a master's or doctoral degree. Research and graduate 
training are conducted in the pathobiology of con- 
nective tissues, stress proteins and developmental 
biology. Also graduate training programs are offered 
in surgical and clinical oral pathology. 
DP AT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 



THE DENTAL PROG RAM. 19 



ORTHODONTICS 

Chairman: William M. Davidson 

Professor: Davidson 

Clinical Professor: Smith 

Associate Professor: Josell 

Clinical Associate Professors: Pavlick, R. Williams 

Assistant Professor: Shroff 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Apicella, Long, 

Markin, Pick, Rubier, Scornavacca, Siegel, Sweren, 

Weisberg 

Clinical Instructors: Cofie, Durkee, Jenkins, 

Kearns, Lawyer, Maro, Marshall, McGrogan, 

Switzer, Wilson 

Associate Staff: Gipe, Lawson 

The predoctoral program of instruction in ortho- 
dontics is directed toward providing the -dental stu- 
dent with the knowledge and skills necessary to rec- 
ognize an established or developing malocclusion, 
provide preventive and therapeutic treatment 
within the scope of the general dental practice, 
consult as a team member with the specialist, refer 
cases requiring specialist care as appropriate and co- 
ordinate comprehensive care of the patient. 

Instruction in orthodontics occurs during all four 
years of the dental program. Didactic and laboratory 
exercises provide a strong foundation for delivery of 
limited orthodontic treatment as part of an adult 
and child patient's comprehensive dental care. 
Elective and clerkship opportunities are available 
for those who wish to pursue additional course work 
and clinical experience. 

The department conducts research in growth 
and development, experimental and diagnostic 
imaging, the biology of tooth movement, properties 
and bio-compatibility of orthodontic materials and 
the physiology of facial musculature. 
ORTH 522. Orthodontics (1) 
ORTH 538. Orthodontics (2) 
ORTH 548. Orthodontics (2) 



PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 

Chairman: James T. Rule 

Professors: Abrams, Minah, Rule, Wagner 

Clinical Professor: Kihn 

Associate Professors: Josell, Owen, Shelton 

Clinical Associate Professors: Balis, Coll, Schulz 

Clinical Assistant Professors: Ackerman, Crafton, 

Gierlach, Ginsberg, Lyon, Miller 

Associate Staff: Gilner 



The primary introduction to dentistry for children 
begins in the third year through didactic instruc- 
tion and clinical experiences and continues during 
the fourth year of the dental program. The depart- 
ment also presents lectures and laboratory projects 
and participates in Conjoint Sciences during the 
first two years. Particular attention is devoted to 
diagnosis and treatment planning, preventive pro- 
cedures including fluoride therapy and sealants, 
non-punitive patient management techniques, 
treatment of traumatic injuries to the primary and 
young permanent dentition, restorative procedures 
in primary teeth, pulpal therapy and interceptive 
orthodontics. In the context of departmental edu- 
cational goals, graduates learn to provide compre- 
hensive dental care for the young patients while 
encouraging the development of a positive attitude 
toward dental care. 




Research efforts are devoted to the study of den- 
tal caries in minority populations, effects of preven- 
tive interventions on caries in infants and young 
children and the evaluation of therapeutic agents 
by means of clinical trials. 
PEDS 522. Pediatric Dentistry (1) 
PEDS 538. Pediatric Dentistry (8) 
PEDS 548. Pediatric Dentistry (6) 



PERIODONTICS 

Chairman: John J. Bergquist 

Professors: Bergquist, G. Bowers, Hawley, Ranney 

Clinical Professors: Halpert, Zupnik 

Research Professor: Boughman 

Assistant Professor: Guthmiller 

Clinical Associate Professors: Feldman, Freilich, 

Lever, Plessett, Serio, Winson 



20. DENTAL SCHOOL 



Clinical Assistant Professors: Arceo, Bowen, 
Branch-Mays, Felthousen, Gannon, Green, Hay- 
duk, K. Hooper, Kassolis, Lazzaro, Morrison, S. 
Park, Passaro, B. Phillips, Raulin, Rethman, Rosen, 
Sachs, Sindler, Trail, Walker, Welch, Zeren 
Research Assistant Professors: J. Bowers 
Instructor: Hatfield 

Clinical Instructors: Barnes, Curley, Maurantonio, 
Robson, L. Tewes 

Students are introduced to fundamental periodon- 
tics in lectures during the first and second years; 
clinical experience begins in the first year of the 
dental program. In the third year, students have di- 
dactic exposure to advanced periodontal proce- 
dures. Third- and fourth-year students enter into a 
learning contract that delineates a set of basic mini- 
mum clinical experiences. Interested students have 
the opportunity to choose from a broad range of ad- 
ditional experiences and to contract for both addi- 
tional experiences and the grade the student feels 
these experiences warrant. Thus, individual stu- 
dents have substantial involvement in establishing 
their educational goals. 

The department conducts research in regenera- 
tive therapy, early onset periodontitis, microbial ge- 
netics, chemotherapeutic agents, connective tissue 
pathology, periodontal pathogens, immunobiology, 
implantology and education. 
PERI 518. Periodontics (2) 
PERI 528. Periodontics (2) 
PERI 538. Periodontics (11) 
PERI 548. Periodontics (11) 



RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 
Chairman: Van P. Thompson 
Professors: Reese, Strassler, Thompson 
Associate Professors: Buchness, Gerhardt, Lit- 
kowski, Wood 

Dental School Associate Professors: Baer, Brad- 
bury, Conway, Eastwood, Elias, Faraone, Gunder- 
son, Miller, Stevens 

Clinical Associate Professors: Feldman, Green- 
baum, Griswold, Iddings, Mort, Whitaker 
Dental School Assistant Professors: Hack, Payne, 
S. Siegel, Wood 

Clinical Assistant Professors: K. Chu, Davliakos, 
I. S. Fried, Inge, Progebin, Prymas, Sachs, Schwart:, 
Vandenbosche, Vera, Zeller 



Clinical Instructors: Blum, Fitzgerald, Fulton, Gre- 
bosky, Kilian, Mastella, Morgan, Oates, RuDusky, 
Ruliffson, Scaggs, Tate, Vail, Vu, Wealcatch 
Associate Staff: Baier, Dempsey, King, Suls 

The department of restorative dentistry is responsi- 
ble for major segments of the curriculum related to 
dental anatomy, occlusion, dental biomaterials, op- 
erative dentistry, and fixed and removable prostho- 
dontics. 

The curriculum in the first and second years con- 
centrates on methods and materials used to restore 
and replace missing teeth. The preventive dimen- 
sion of restorative care and treatment planning are 
emphasized as well. During this period, limited but 
increasing clinical experience, with close faculty su- 
pervision, augments and reinforces the didactic 
foundation. Instruction includes lectures, seminars, 
self-instructional programs, laboratory exercises and 
clinical simulation. 

In the third and fourth year, lectures and semi- 
nars support comprehensive clinical treatment of 
patients in restorative dentistry. Clerkships are of- 
fered in the fourth year to students who demon- 
strate unusual skill in the restorative area. Occlu- 
sion, dental biomaterials, advanced concepts in 
fixed and removable prosthodontics, implants and 
esthetic dentistry are covered in seminars and selec- 
tive courses. 

Departmental research includes adhesive bond- 
ing to tissues and restorative materials, long term 
clinical evaluation of "Maryland" bridges, control- 
ling tooth sensitivity, evaluation of physical proper- 
ties of numerous dental materials, evaluation of 
osseo- integrated implants, infection control and 
computer aided design and manufacture of cast 
restorations. 

REST 511. Dental Anatomy/Occlusion (4) 
REST 512. Operative Dentistry (5) 
REST 518. Dental Biomaterials I (2) 
REST 522. Dental Biomaterials II ( 1 ) 
REST 528. Fixed Prosthodontics (6) 
REST 529A. Complete Dentures (3) 
REST 529B. Removable Prosthodontics (3) 
REST 538A. Operative Dentistry (7) 
REST 538B. Fixed Prosthodontics (6) 
REST 538C. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 
REST 548A. Operative Dentistry (5) 
REST 548B. Fixed Prosthodontics (10) 
REST 548C. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 




Till: HI: K T A L r roi; R,\ M . :i 



Dental Hygiene Programs 




Chairman: Linda DeVore 

Associate Professor: DeVore, Fried, Parker, 
Samuels 

Assistant Professor: Dean 
Dental School Assistant Professor: Can- 
Clinical Instructors: Fellona, Slotke, Warren 
Academic Advisors: 

Carr (Preprofessional B.S. Program) 
Fried (Degree Completion B.S. Program) 
Parker (Graduate Program) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Dental School offers both a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence and a Master of Science degree in dental hy- 
giene. The baccalaureate degree can be earned in 
one of two educational programs: the Preprofes- 
sional/Professional Program and the Degree Com- 
pletion Program. The objective of both baccalaure- 
ate programs is to develop in the students the 
knowledge, skills, attitudes and values needed to as- 
sume positions of responsibility in a variety of 
health care, educational, research and community 
settings. In addition, these programs are designed to 
provide a foundation for graduate study in dental 
hygiene or related disciplines. Information about 
the graduate program in dental hygiene begins on 
page 43 of the Advanced Education section. 

The dental hygienist, as a member of the oral 
health care team, strives to improve oral health by 
providing preventive and educational services to 
the public. Clinical dental hygiene services include 
assessing patients' general and oral health status, re- 
moving deposits and stains from teeth, taking den- 
tal x-rays and applying fluorides and sealants. Edu- 
cational and management services for individuals 
and/or groups may include providing nutritional 
and oral hygiene counseling; conducting educa- 
tional programs; and planning, implementing and 
evaluating community oral health programs. 

Employment Opportunities in Dental Hygiene 

The majority of dental hygienists are employed in 
private dental offices. However, there are increasing 
opportunities for those with baccalaureate and grad- 
uate degrees in dental hygiene education; commu- 
nity, school and public health programs; private and 
public institutions; armed forces; research; and 
other special areas of practice. 

Current dental hygiene graduates working full 
time can anticipate initial annual income of ap- 



proximately $35,000, depending on the area, re- 
sponsibilities, type of practice and general eco- 
nomic conditions. 

PREPROFESSIONAL/PROFESSIONAL 
BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

This program consists of two main parts: a two-year 
preprofessional curriculum at one of the three Uni- 
versity of Maryland campuses (College Park, Balti- 
more County or Eastern Shore) or at another ac- 
credited college, community college or university, 
and a two-or three-year professional curriculum 
at the Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore. 



Two-Year Preprofessional Curriculum 
A listing of the courses and credit hour require- 
ments for the preprofessional curriculum follows. 
These courses provide a foundation in basic sci- 
ences, social sciences and general education. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to meet with the dental hy- 
giene advisor each semester to ensure appropriate 
course scheduling. 

Courses 

6 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
8 
4 
3 
6 
6 
3 
3 



English Composition 

* Inorganic Chemistry 

* Organic Chemistry 
General Zoology or Biology 
General Psychology 
General Sociology 
Public Speaking 

* Human Anatomy and Physiology 

* Microbiology 
Principles of Nutrition 

** Humanities 
*** Social Sciences 
Statistics 
Electives 



60 
These courses must include a laboratory and meet the re- 
quirements for science majors. Survey or terminal courses 
for nonscience majors are not acceptable for transfer. 

** Humanities: Courses must be selected from the following 
areas: literature, philosophy, history, fine arts, speech, 
math or language. 

***Social Sciences: General psychology and sociology are re- 
quired; the remaining six credits should he selected from 
courses m psychology, sociology, computer science, gov- 
ernment and politics or anthropology. 



• M- NTAL SCHOOL 



Application and Admission Procedures 

High school students who wish to enroll in the pre- 
professional curriculum should request applications 
directly from the admissions office of the University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; the 
University of Maryland Baltimore County, 5401 
Wilkens Avenue, Catonsville, Maryland 21228; or 
the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess 
Anne, Maryland 21853; or any accredited college, 
community college or university. 

It is recommended that those preparing for a 
baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene pursue an 
academic program in high school which includes 
courses in biology, chemistry, algebra and social sci- 
ences. Applicants should note the University of 
Maryland policy concerning prevention and man- 
agement of student and employee infection with 
bloodborne pathogens, page 76. In addition, indi- 
viduals who may have had a prior or subsequent 
conviction or nolo contendre plea for a felony may 
encounter denial or removal of licensure. 



TWO- AND THREE-YEAR PROFESSIONAL 
CURRICULA 

Two-Year Professional Curriculum 

The professional curriculum includes clinical and 
didactic courses in the Dental School. Throughout 
these two years, dental hygiene students work con- 
currently with dental students to provide patient 
care. 

During the first year, students expand upon their 
preprofessional basic science knowledge as it per- 
tains to dental hygiene practice. In a clinical set- 
ting, the students begin to develop the skills, 
knowledge and judgment necessary to collect data 
for patient treatment; assess each patient's oral 
health status; and select and provide preventive and 
educational services, based on the individual needs 
of the patient. 

During the second year, students demonstrate 
increasing proficiency and self-direction in assessing 
patients' oral health status, planning and providing 
preventive services and identifying the need for 
consultation and referral. To enrich their educa- 
tional experiences, students provide educational 
and/or clinical services in a variety of community 
settings, such as hospitals; schools; and facilities for 
the handicapped, chronically ill and aged. Dental 
hygiene students also have an opportunity to work 
with dental students as primary providers for the 



physically disabled, mentally handicapped and indi- 
viduals with serious medical conditions or infec- 
tious diseases. Senior students also take courses in 
education, research and management which enable 
them to develop fundamental skills that are neces- 
sary for various career options within the profession. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



CREDIT 



Semester I 
Prevention and Control of Oral 

Disease I 6 

Periodontics for the Dental Hygienist I 2 

Oral Biology 7 

Education and Treatment Planning 
Strategies 2 

17 

Semester 2 
Prevention and Control of Oral 

Diseases II 5 

Periodontics for the Dental Hygienist II 2 

Educational Program Development 3 

Care and Management of the 

Special Patient 2 

Methods and Materials in 

Dentistry 3 

General Pharmacology and Therapeutics 3 
Oral Radiology 2 

20 



SENIOR YEAR 



CREDIT 



Semester 
Advanced Clinical Practice I 5 

Perspectives of Dental Hygiene Practice 3 
Community Service I 1 

Community Oral Health 3 

Introduction to Oral Health Research 2 

14 



Advanced Clinical Practice II 
Community Service II (optional) 
Issues in Health Care Delivery 
Health Care Management 



Semester 2 

5 
(1) 

3 

3 
11 or 12 



Three-Year Professional Curriculum Option 

Although most students complete the professional 
curriculum in two years as outlined, a three-year 
professional curriculum option is offered. This 
three-year plan is a modification in the sequence 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS* 23 



and number of professional courses taken each se- 
mester. This curriculum can be an attractive option 
for students who may wish to lighten their acade- 
mic load due to family or work commitments; or for 
students who are otherwise eligible to enter at the 
junior level but have not yet successfully completed 
all of the required preprofessional courses. Students 
admitted to this curriculum must have the recom- 
mendation of the program advisor and approval of 
the admissions committee. Students enrolled in this 
curriculum may not have full-time status for one or 
more semesters of the program. This may influence 
their eligibility for certain scholarships and student 
insurance discounts. 




Application and Admission Procedures 

College students enrolled in the preprofessional 
curriculum should communicate regularly with the 
dental hygiene advisor at the Dental School to en- 
sure that the courses selected satisfy the degree re- 
quirements. After completion of two semesters of 
the preprofessional curriculum, students may re- 
quest an application from the office of records and 
registration, 621 West Lombard Street, Room 326, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201; or from the office of admissions 
and student affairs of the Dental School. Applica- 
tions for the Baltimore campus should be received 
no later than April 1 prior to the fall semester for 
which the studenl wishes to enroll. 

A minimum grade point average of 2.3 in the 
preprofessional curriculum is recommended and 
preferenc e will be given to those students who have 
high scholastic averages, especially in science 
courses A sc ience grade point average of J.O is gen- 
erally encouraged to enhance competitiveness. 



Enrollment at anothet University of Maryland 
campus or completion of the preprofessional cur- 
riculum does not guarantee admission to the profes- 
sional curriculum at the Dental School. Enrollment 
in the dental hygiene program is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be re- 
quired to send a deposit of $200 with a letter of in- 
tent to enroll. This deposit will be credited toward 
tuition at registration, but will not be refunded in 
the event of failure to enroll. 

Projected Average Expenditures 

In addition to the expenses of tuition and fees 
which are listed on page 56, junior dental hygiene 
students should estimate spending $1,700 on instru- 
ment service, uniforms and supplies and $600 on 
textbooks. Senior dental hygiene students should 
estimate spending $1,100 on instrument service and 
supplies, $300 on textbooks and $500 on regional 
and national board examination fees. Field experi- 
ences in both the junior and senior years may entail 
additional costs for travel and/or meals at sites out- 
side the Dental School. 



Qraduation Requirements 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
dental hygiene must complete the preprofessional 
and the professional curricula as outlined. Students 
must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 
2.0 and complete a total of 122 credits to be eligible 
for graduation. 

National and Regional Board Examinations 
Clinical and comprehensive written examinations 

are given in the spring of the senior year. Successful 
completion of these exams is necessary to obtain a 
license to practice dental hygiene. 

Courses 

DHYG 311. Prevention and Control of Oral 
Disease I (6). The study o\ the morphologic char- 
acteristics and physiologic relationships of teeth 
and supporting structures; and the basic foundation 
for clinical dental hygiene practice are presented in 
lectures, class discussions and audiovisual presenta- 
tions. Simulation and clinical experiences provide 
the opportunity for practical application of the 
principles and procedures tor the identification, pre- 
vention and control ot oral diseases. 



1 . m \ i i 5CHOO! 



DHYG 312. Oral Biology (7). The study of em- 
bryology and histology; anatomy and physiology; 
microbiology; and pathology with emphasis on the 
head, neck and oral cavity are presented in lecture, 
laboratory and audiovisual format. 

DHYG 313. Education and Treatment Planning 
Strategies (2). The study of the elements of human 
behavior, principles of learning, methods of teach- 
ing and principles of communication as they relate 
to teaching oral health care to individuals and 
groups. Classroom discussions, small group activities 
and clinical experiences provide the opportunity for 
application of these topics. 

DHYG 314. Periodontics for the Dental Hy- 
gienist 1 (2). The study of the etiology, diagnosis 
and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases as well as 
the anatomy and morphology of the tooth root and 
surrounding supportive structures are presented in 
lecture and discussion sessions. 

DHYG 321. Prevention and Control of Oral 
Diseases II (5). The study of principles and proce- 
dures for the prevention of oral disease including 
dental health education, oral hygiene measures, di- 
etary control of dental disease, use of fluorides and 
the oral prophylaxis. Students work with dental stu- 
dents to simulate the postgraduation team delivery 
of dental care. 

DHYG 322. Community Oral Health (3). Meth- 
ods of determining community oral health status, 
identifying barriers to optimum health, and select- 
ing appropriate interventions are presented concur- 
rently with community program planning activities. 
Throughout the course, the role of the dental hy- 
gienist in community oral health is emphasized. 

DHYG 323. Care and Management of the Special 
Patient (2). Through classroom discussion, reading 
assignments, independent study, group projects and 
community involvement, the dental hygiene stu- 
dent will develop a philosophy for the care and 
management of special patients for whom routine 
care may be complicated by age or unusual health 
factors. 

DHYG 324. Methods and Materials in Dentistry 
(3). An introduction to the science of dental mate- 
rials, including the composition and utilization of 
dental materials as they apply to clinical dental hy- 
giene procedures, dental assisting and patient edu- 
cation, is presented in lecture, class discussion and 
laboratory format. 



DPHR 325. General Pharmacology and Oral 
Therapeutics (3). The study of drugs and their use 
in the treatment, diagnosis and prevention of dis- 
ease; the absorption, distribution, metabolism, ex- 
cretion and mechanism of action of drugs; and drug 
interactions, rationale for use, indications and con- 
traindications are presented in lecture and class dis- 
cussion format. Emphasis is placed on the relevance 
of this information to providing patient care. 

DHYG 326. Oral Radiology (2). By means of lec- 
ture, laboratory and clinic activities, the students 
are introduced to the science of ionizing radiation; 
the production and effects of x-rays; and the various 
techniques of oral roentgenography. Students gain 
experience exposing, processing, mounting, assess- 
ing the diagnostic quality of and interpreting radio- 
graphs. The rationale and practices to insure radia- 
tion safety are stressed throughout the course. 

DHYG 327. Periodontics for the Dental Hy- 
gienist II (2). The study of the diseases of the peri- 
odontium focusing on the management, therapeu- 
tics and prevention of periodontal diseases is 
presented through lecture and classroom discussion. 

DHYG 411-421. Advanced Clinical Practice I 

and II (5-5). Clinical experiences in principles and 
procedures of dental hygiene practice are provided 
in general dentistry clinics through a concurrent pa- 
tient treatment program with dental students. Stu- 
dents have the opportunity to experience and par- 
ticipate in alternative practice settings through 
block assignments to dental specialty clinics within 
the school. 

DHYG 412. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 
Practice (3). Senior students have the opportunity 
to explore advanced principles and skills of dental 
hygiene practice. The primary focus of the course is 
divided into three major units: pain control, ad- 
vanced periodontics and myo-oral facial pain. Also 
included in the course is an introduction to intra- 
oral photography and case documentation. The em- 
phasis of this course is to broaden the student's per- 
spective of dental hygiene practice as it exists across 
the country. 

DHYG 413-423. Community Service I and II 
(1-1). The externship program provides opportu- 
nities for senior students to select experiences be- 
yond those given within the Dental School set- 
ting. The selection of the community site is based 
on the student's interests and career goals. Sites 




DENTAL HYGIENE PRO GRAMS. 25 



include well-baby clinics, prenatal clinics, commu- 
nity health centers, nursing homes, senior citizen 
centers, facilities for the handicapped, hospitals, 
military clinics and schools, day care centers, pub- 
lic health department and research centers. 
(DHYG 423 is optional). 

DHYG 414. Educational Program Development 
(3). Students in this course have the opportunity to 
explore various ways in which effective instruc- 
tional skills may contribute to a career in dental hy- 
giene. Learning experiences are designed to enable 
the student to develop these skills and to project 
their application in such areas as public school sys- 
tems, community health programs, higher educa- 
tion and consumer education. 

DHYG 416. Introduction to Oral Health Re- 
search (2). This course is designed to acquaint stu- 
dents with research methodology and its applica- 
tion to the dental hygiene profession. Emphasis is 
placed upon: heightening student awareness of the 
need for dental hygiene research; developing stu- 
dent capabilities to identify research problems and 
design and execute meaningful research studies; and 
enabling students to accurately appraise the quality 
of research reports. 




DHYG 424. Special Topics ( 1 ). Students are pro- 
vided an opportunity to pursue in-depth topics of 
special interest. The program of study is designed by 
each student and approved by faculty prior to the 
beginning of the course. The study program may re- 
late to an area of interest in clinical dental hygiene, 
education, management or research and may con- 
sist of special reading assignments, reports, confer- 
ences, and possibly clinic, laboratory or extramural 
experience. (Optional) 



DHYG 425. Issues in Health Care Delivery (3). 

Students examine and analyze the issues that affect 
the broad spectrum of health care delivery. Select 
topics of interest include ethics and professional re- 
sponsibility, inequities in health care delivery and 
health care legislation. Students present table clin- 
ics on timely oral health topics or deliver reports on 
women's health issues. 

DHYG 427. Health Care Management (3). Stu- 
dents are introduced to skills essential for effective 
management in their personal and professional 
roles. Areas of emphasis include the dental team 
environment, managerial planning and decision 
making, fiscal issues, career planning, resumes and 
interviewing. Management principles are applied to 
a variety of oral health care delivery settings. 

DEGREE COMPLETION BACCALAUREATE 
PROGRAM 

The degree completion program provides the op- 
portunity for registered dental hygienists who hold a 
certificate or associate degree to pursue studies lead- 
ing to a Bachelor of Science degree in dental hy- 
giene. The curriculum is designed in two phases of 
full- or part-time study to meet each individual's 
academic, clinical and career interests. 



Program Requirements 

Phase I: General Requirements. Phase 1 consists o{ 
the student's previous dental hygiene courses and 
general course requirements, totaling 90 semester 
credits. General course requirements for the bac- 
calaureate degree may be taken at any one of the 
three University of Maryland campuses (College 
Park, Baltimore County or Eastern Shore) or at an- 
other accredited college or university. The courses 
required are the same as those listed in the Prepro- 
fessional Program freshman and sophomore years, 
except only one chemistry and one anatomy/physi- 
ology course is required. Transfer credits are granted 
for dental hygiene courses from an accredited pro- 
gram. To obtain transfer credit, students must attain 
a grade of C or better in all courses taken at an insti- 
tution outside the Maryland state university system. 
Consultation with the degree completion program 
coordinator regarding transfer courses is recom- 
mended. 



r A 1 C H o o 



Phase II: Degree Completion Requirements. The de- 
gree completion program at the Dental School con- 
sists of two core seminars, totaling four credit hours 
(DHYG 410, 420); senior level didactic courses, to- 
taling 14 credit hours (DHYG 412, 414, 416, 424 
(optional], 425 and 427); and 12 credit hours of aca- 
demic electives, generally taken at another campus. 
A variable credit practicum course, DHYG 418- 
428, may be taken for elective credit. 



Enrollment at another University of Maryland 
campus does not guarantee admission to the degree 
completion program at the Dental School. Enroll- 
ment in the degree completion program is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be re- 
quired to send a deposit o{ $200 with a letter of in- 
tent to enroll. This deposit will be credited toward 
tuition at registration, but will not be refunded in 
the event of failure to enroll. 




Curriculum Planning 

Registered dental hygienists should submit to the 
degree completion program advisor transcripts from 
their dental hygiene program and all other institu- 
tions attended, so that transfer credits may be evalu- 
ated and a program developed to satisfy remaining 
requirements. Students should meet regularly with 
the advisor to ensure appropriate course scheduling 
in Phase I. 



Application and Admission Procedures 

In addition to meeting the general course require- 
ments, the student applying for admission to the de- 
gree completion program at the Dental School 
must: 

1. Be a graduate of an accredited dental hygiene 
program; 

2. Be licensed in at least one state. 

3. Have a minimum grade point average of 2.5. 
Applications for admission may be obtained 

from the office of records and registration, Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore, 62 1 West Lombard 
Street, Room 326, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 or 
from the office of admissions and student affairs in 
the Dental School. Applications should be received 
no later than April 1 prior to the fall semester for 
which the student wishes to enroll. 



Student Expenses 

Tuition and fees are listed on page 56. The charges 
for instrument service, supplies and uniforms are 
not applicable for degree completion students. 
Textbook costs would be considerably lower. 



Qraduation Requirements 

One hundred twenty semester credit hours are re- 
quired for the Bachelor of Science degree in the de- 
gree completion dental hygiene program. The last 
30 credit hours toward the baccalaureate degree 
must be taken at the University of Maryland. 
Courses not offered at the Dental School will be 
taken at another University of Maryland campus. 

Courses 

See pages 25 and 26 for ^course descriptions of 
DHYG 412, 414, 416, 424, 425 and 427. 

DHYG 410-420. Seminar in Dental Hygiene 
(3-1) (degree completion only). Reinforcement, 
updating and expansion of dental hygiene profes- 
sional skills, knowledge and attitudes. Topic areas 
which are explored through seminar, laboratory and 
extramural formats include dental public health, 
preventive dentistry, process of dental hygiene care 
and options for dental hygiene practice. Emphasis is 
placed on developing oral and written communica- 
tion skills necessary for the dental hygienist in a va- 
riety of health care, educational, research or com- 
munity settings. 

DHYG 418-428. Dental Hygiene Practicum 

(1-4/1-4)*. Individually designed didactic and/or 
clinical experiences in a special area of dental hy- 
giene clinical practice, teaching, community dental 
health or research. 

*Ekctive variable credit course that requires approval of 
degree completion program coordinator. 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAMS. 27 



Advanced Education Programs 




APPLICATION/ADMISSION 

All applicants for specialty and residency programs 
must hold the D.D.S., D.M.D. or equivalent degree, 
and must give evidence of high scholastic achieve- 
ment. All programs require a supplemental applica- 
tion, official transcripts of undergraduate and dental 
school coursework and three letters of recommen- 
dation. With the exception of prosthodontics, all 
programs additionally require official transcripts of 
Parts I and II of the National Boards. Applicants 
who are not citizens or permanent residents of the 
United States must present evidence of mastering 
English as a foreign language (a minimum score of 
550 on the TOEFL examination is required), and 
must provide evidence of financial support for their 
studies. Further, graduates of non-U. S./Canadian 
dental schools may be required to furnish a transla- 
tion and evaluation, in English, of their academic 
record by a certified agency. Individual specialty 
training programs may impose additional require- 
ments as indicated within their program descrip- 
tions. 

Applications to the programs in advanced edu- 
cation in general dentistry, general practice resi- 
dency, oral and maxillofacial surgery and pediatric 
dentistry must be made through the Postdoctoral 
Application Support Service (PASS). Applications 
to programs in endodontics, orthodontics, peri- 
odontics and prosthodontics should be made di- 
rectly to the Dental School. 

To be interviewed and considered for admission 
to an advanced education program in general den- 
tistry, general practice residency, oral and maxillo- 
facial surgery, pediatric dentistry, periodontics and 
prosthodontics, applicants must participate in the 
National Matching Service. 

The endodontics and orthodontics programs do 
not participate in the National Matching Service 
and make offers directly to applicants. 

Students intending to pursue a Master of Sci- 
ence degree must submit a separate application to 
the Graduate School. 

The application deadline for all programs begin- 
ning in July is October 1 of the preceding year, with 
the exception of pediatric dentistry, which has a 
deadline date of October 1 5. 

Prior to applying to the Dental School, potential 
applicants should note the University of Maryland 
at Baltimore policy concerning prevention and 
management of student and employee infection 
with bloodborne pathogens, page 76. In addition, 



while the admissions process does not include ques- 
tions concerning any prior criminal activity, indi- 
viduals who may have had a prior or subsequent 
conviction or nolo contendre plea for a felony may 
encounter denial or removal of licensure. 

All requests for applications and additional in- 
formation pertaining to specialty and residency pro- 
grams should be directed to: 

Advanced Dental Education Programs 
Office of Admissions and Student Affairs, 

Room 4-A-22 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 
666 West Baltimore Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

All requests for applications or information pertain- 
ing to the graduate programs should be directed to: 

University of Maryland Graduate School, 

Baltimore 
5401 Wilkens Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

SPECIALTY PROGRAMS 

(general Information 

Advanced Specialty Education certificate programs 
are designed to provide successful candidates eligi- 
bility for examination by the appropriate specialty 
boards under the Commission on Dental Accredita- 
tion of the American Dental Association. Programs 
of 24 months each are offered in the following disci- 
plines: endodontics, pediatric dentistry and pros- 
thodontics. The periodontics program is 30 to 36 
months' duration; the program in orthodontics is 36 
months; the oral and maxillofacial surgery residency 
program extends over a period of six years. 

Qualified applicants for advanced specialty edu- 
cation programs may seek dual enrollment as candi- 
dates in combined certificate/degree programs. Suc- 
cessful candidates are awarded a certificate in a 
clinical specialty by the Dental School and the de- 
gree Master of Science in Oral Biology by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore. 
Programs are also available for those who wish to 
pursue a graduate degree in one of the basic sciences 
concurrently with clinic specialty education. 

All programs are accredited by the Commission 
on Dental Accreditation, a specialized accrediting 
body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary 



. i 1 1 r A 1 3 C H O 1 



Accreditation and the United States Department of 
Education. 

Facilities 

All specialty programs except oral and maxillofacial 
surgery utilize individual private operatories on the 
third floor of the Dental School in an area desig- 
nated Advanced Specialty Clinics. Programs pro- 
vide conference rooms for students and maintain 
appropriate laboratory and research facilities. Stu- 
dents have access to departmental libraries, the 
Health Sciences Library on the campus as well as 
the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, 
Maryland. Also available within the Dental School 
is an Independent Learning Center where students 
may utilize materials in a variety of media. The pro- 
gram in oral and maxillofacial surgery is based in 
University Hospital, a large metropolitan teaching 
hospital adjacent to the Dental School. 

Financial Support 

Stipends for postgraduate candidates may be avail- 
able on a limited basis. Information regarding the 
extent of these stipends can be obtained by writing 
to individual program directors. 

Requirements for Certification 

A postgraduate certificate is awarded to candidates 
who have satisfied all requirements of the program 
and have paid all debts to the university. 

Academic Standards for Certification 

In the evaluation of postgraduate student perfor- 
mance, the following letter grades are used: 
A, B, C — passing 
F — failing 

I — incomplete 

Students must maintain an overall B average. A 
course in which a grade of less than B is received 
may be repeated at the discretion of the depart- 
ment. The grade in the repeated course, whether it 
is higher or lower than the original grade, replaces 
the original grade. All failing and incomplete grades 
must be removed before a certificate is conferred. A 
course with an incomplete grade does not have to 
be repeated, but the requirements of the course 
must be satisfied before a certificate is conferred. 

Further, students must demonstrate clinical 
competency in all areas of patient management and 



treatment. Any student who fails to meet these aca- 
demic standards in a given semester may not be per- 
mitted to continue in the program. 

ENDODONTICS 

Objectives 

To provide the endodontic resident with an in- 
depth background in the basic sciences as related 
to the discipline and practice of endodontics. 

To provide the resident with appropriate clinical 
experiences which will result in proficiency in 
the practice of endodontics. 

To develop the skills necessary for the graduate to 
become competent in the area of research. 

To inform residents of the necessity and advantages 
of participation in organized dentistry. 

To develop the knowledge base for graduates to be- 
come diplomates of the American Board of En- 
dodontics. 

To prepare residents to seek a career in the private 
practice of endodontics, research and/or en- 
dodontic education. 



Scope of Training 

The program integrates both biological and clinical 
sciences. Lectures, seminars and literature reviews 
cover diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment ob- 
jectives and a variety of topics related to endodon- 
tics and to dentistry in general. Students attend pro- 
fessional meetings and continuing education 
courses held within the university and in the Balti- 
more-Washington area. 

The heaviest concentration of basic science ma- 
terial is in the first year of study. During that year, 
the student is expected to choose a research topic 
and to write a protocol for presentation to the fac- 
ulty and other graduate students. The results of this 
research are presented at a special seminar in the 
last semester of study and, if possible, at a national 
meeting. Interspersed with the basic science courses 
are a variety of clinical courses supervised by trained 
specialists from a variety of backgrounds. 

The second year of study emphasizes clinical en- 
dodontics including conventional treatment, re- 
treatment, management of emergencies, endodon- 
tics and surgery. Residents devote a significant 
amount of time and effort to completion of their re- 
search projects. Also, appropriate time is devoted to 
clinical teaching during this year. 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS. 29 



Site of Training 

The major site of training is at the Dental School, 
including the Special Patient Clinic and Advanced 
General Dentistry Clinic. However, rotations at the 
National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Af- 
fairs Medical Center are also included in the En- 
dodontic program. 



Number of Positions 

Four 



Stipends 

Stipends are provided for Year 
be available in Year I. 



residents and 



Faculty 

Thomas C. Dumsha, M.S., D.D.S., Chairman, 
Diplomate, American Board of Endodontics 

Cindy Rauschenberger, D.D.S., M.S., Acting Pro- 
gram Director, Diplomate, American Board of En- 
dodontics 

Irving Abramson, D.D.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Endodontics 

Edward K. Gamson, D.D.S., M.S. 

James L. Gutmann, D.D.S. Diplomate, American 
Board of Endodontics 

John Hyson, D.D.S., M.S. 

William Patrick Kelly, D.D.S. 

Douglas J. Koch, D.D.S. 

Neville McDonald, B.D.S., M.S. 

Frederick J. Quarantillo, D.D.S, M.S. 

Howard E. Schunick, D.D.S. 

Burt Waxman, D.D.S. 



Special Admission Quidelines 

• High scholastic achievement. 

• Clinical experience weighted heavily. 

• A personal interview is desirable. 



Length of Program 

24 months — certificate 

30 months — certificate and master's degree 



Curriculum 
YEAR I 


CREDITS 


ENDO 558A 


Graduate Conjoint Seminar 


2 


ENDO 567B 


Advanced Case Analysis 


1 


ENDO 568A 


Fundamentals of Endodontics 


: 


ENDO 568B 


Treatment Planning Seminar 


4 


ENDO 569A 


Clinical Endodontics 


48 


ENDO 569B 


Endodontic Techniques 


3 


ENDO 578A 


Biological Bases for 
Pulpal Therapy 


3 


ENDO 578B 


Research in Endodontics 


6 


ENDO 579A 


Experimental Bases for 
Conventional Endodontic 
Therapy 


3 


ENDO 588A 


Biological Bases for 
Periradicular Therapy 


3 


ENDO 589A 


Experimental Bases for 
Nonconventional Endo 

Therapy 


3 


ENDO 598A 


Current Endodontic Literature 


: 


ENDO 599A 


Special Topics 


l 


DANA 618 


Head and Neck Anatomy 


2 


DANA 622 


Oral Histology and Embryology 


: 


DANA 633 


Temporomandibular Joint 


l 


DANA 638 


Data Analysis Research 


3 


DMIC 609 


Special Problems in 
Microbiology 


1 


DMIC 622 


Immunology and Oral Diseases 


3 


DPHR 636 


Pharmacology of Anesthetic 
Drugs 


3 


DPHR 656 


Dental Toxicology 


2 


DPHS 639 


Oral Neurophysiology Seminar 


1 


YEAR II 


ENDO 558C 


Graduate Conjoint Seminar 


2 


ENDO 567D 


Advanced Case Analysis 


1 


ENDO 568C 


Clinical Emergencies in 

Endodontics 


12 


ENDO 568D 


Treatment Planning Seminar 


4 


ENDO 569C 


Advanced Clinical 
Endodontics 


36 



30 • D E N T A L SCHOOL 



ENDO 569D 


Pedagogical Techniques in 
Endodontics 


2 


ENDO 578C 


Biological Basis for 
Pulpal Therapy 


3 


ENDO 578D 


Research in Endodontics 


6 


ENDO 579C 


Experimental Bases for 
Conventional Endo Therapy 


3 


ENDO 588C 


Biological Bases for 
Periradicular Therapy 


3 


ENDO 589C 


Experimental Bases for 
Nonconventional Endo 
Therapy 


3 


ENDO 598C 


Current Endodontic Literature 


2 


ENDO 599 


Special Topics 


1 


DPAT612 


Oral Pathology Problems I 


2 


DP AT 613 


Oral Pathology Problems II 


2 


DPHS641 


Physiology of Pain 


2 



ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY 

Objectives 

To prepare individuals for a career in the specialty 
of oral and maxillofacial surgery. 

To fulfill educational requirements for specialty cer- 
tification by the American Board of Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery. 

To fulfill the requirements for specialty training of 
the Council on Dental Education (Commission 
on Dental Accreditation) of the American Den- 
tal Association. 

To fulfill the educational requirements for M.D. li- 



Scope of Training 

During the first year, students enter residency train- 
ing in oral and maxillofacial surgery at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Medical System. Residents are as- 
signed to an on-call, nightly and weekend schedule 
on a rotating basis. Students participate in clinical 
exodontia and minor oral surgery. They attend pa- 
tient rounds, oral pathology and physical assess- 
ment course work, surgical-orthodontic confer- 
ences, implant conferences, and are assigned a 
four-month, off-service rotation with the depart- 
ment of anesthesiology. 



The second year of the residency program is at 
University Hospital and the Dental School. Gradu- 
ate instruction in head and neck anatomy, ad- 
vanced oral pathology, clinical pathology, pharma- 
cology, physiology and microbiology is offered. 
Second-year residents perform complicated outpa- 
tient oral surgery in the surgery clinic of the Dental 
School. In addition, second-year residents are intro- 
duced to major oral surgery procedures in the oper- 
ating room. Students attend all departmental con- 
ferences and receive advanced instruction in oral 
and maxillofacial surgery. Research is considered an 
important factor and all trainees are encouraged to 
complete an original research project during the 
second year. 

During the third and fourth years of the resi- 
dency, the oral and maxillofacial surgery residents 
will enter the University of Maryland Medical 
School at the level of the first clinical year. The res- 
idents will be undergraduate medical students for 
these two years. While medical students, residents 
will have the opportunity to spend elective time in 
the Oral and Maxillofacial Department and Med- 
ical Shock Trauma Institute. At the end of the 
fourth year of residency the students will graduate 
with an M.D. degree 

In the fifth year of residency, the resident will 
enter a one-year internship in General Surgey at 
the University of Maryland Medical System. This 
one-year period of training will enable the resident 
to obtain medical licensure. During this period of 
time, the trainee will gain experience in both gen- 
eral medical management of the surgical patient 
and in principals of general surgery. 

The sixth year of residency is at University Hos- 
pital, the Maryland Institute for Emergency Med- 
ical Services Systems and affiliated hospitals. The 
chief residents are responsible for the direction of 
the surgical team on their service, and for the care 
of hospitalized patients. Each chief resident has the 
opportunity to spend one month off-service at other 
hospitals in the United States or at a foreign institu- 
tion. During this year, residents participate in all 
conferences held by the department and complete 
their research projects. 

Site of Training 

During the course of the program, students will ro- 
tate through training sites at the Dental School, 
University of Maryland Medical System, Maryland 




ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS-)! 



Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems 
and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Optional 
off-service rotation to other institutions in the 
United States or in foreign nations is offered. 

Facilities 

Training sites are all fully equipped for the perfor- 
mance of both major and minor oral and maxillofa- 
cial surgical procedures and treatment. 



Number of Positions 

Two 



Faculty 

James R. Hupp, D.M.D., M.D., Chairman, Diplo- 
mats, American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery; Director of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 
University of Maryland Hospital 

Robert A. Ord, D.D.S., M.D., Program Director, 
Dipbmate , American Board of Oral and Maxillofa- 
cial Surgery; Fellow, Royal College of Surgeons 

Donald M. Tilghman, D.D.S., Diplomats, American 
Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 

Stewart A. Bergman, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomats, 
American Board of Oral arid Maxillofacial Surgery 

Henry E. Richter, D.D.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 

Bruce B. Horswell, D.D.S., M.D., Dipbmate, Ameri- 
can Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 

Special Admission Quidelines 

• Applicants must rank in the upper half of their 
dental class. 

• A year of general practice residency, general 
anesthesia residency or two years of practice after 
dental school is preferred. 





• An interview is required prior to acceptance of 
candidates. 

Length of Program 

Six years, including two years at the University of 
Maryland Medical School as a medical student. 



Curriculum 

YEAR I 


CREDITS 


DSUR 568A 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Rounds 


18 


DSUR 568B 


Operating Room 
Advanced Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery 


JO 


DSUR 569A 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Grand Rounds 


2 


DSUR 569B 


Physical Diagnosis 


4 


DSUR 578A 


Patient Care Record Keeping 
Review 


7 


DSUR 579A 


Current Literature Review 


3 


DSUR 588A 


Orthognathic Surgery Seminar 


3 


DSUR 589A 


Special Topics Seminar 


3 


DSUR 598A 


Clinical Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery 


30 


DSUR 601 


Clinical Anesthesiology 


6 


DSUR 609 


Special Problems 


4 


DSUR 631 


Cranio-facial I 


2 


DSUR 799 


Research (M.S. candidates only) 2 


DP AT 612 


Special Problems in 
Oral Pathology 


7 


DPAT613 


Special Problems in 
Oral Pathology 


2 


YEAR 11 


DSUR 568C 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Rounds 


18 


DSUR 569C 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Grand Rounds 


2 


DSUR 578C 


Patient Care and Record 
Keeping 


7 


DSUR 579C 


Current Literature Review 


3 


DSUR 588C 


Orthognathic Surgery Seminar 


3 


DSUR 589C 


Special Topics Seminar 


3 



I N [ A I S ( ■ H O O I 



DSUR 598C 


Advanced Clinical Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery 


18 


DSUR 605 


Surgical Anatomy 


2 


DSUR 609 


Special Problems 


4 


DSUR 799 


Research (M.S. candidates only) 2 


DANA 614 


Anatomy o{ the Head and Neck 3 


DMIC 609 


Special Problems in 

Microbiology 


2 


DPAT616 


Advanced Histopathology of 
Oral Lesions 


3 


DPAT617 


Advanced Histopathology of 
Oral Lesions 


3 


DPHR 636 


Pharmacology of Anesthetic 
Drugs 


3 


DPHS 618 


Advanced Physiology 


3 


YEAR III 


Medical School Clinical Rotations 


YEAR IV 


Medical School Clinical Rotations 


YEARV 


Residency Training in General Surgery 


YEAR VI 


CREDITS 


DSUR 568E 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Rounds 


18 


DSUR 568F 


Operating Room Advanced 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 


30 


DSUR 569E 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Grand Rounds 


2 


DSUR 578E 


Patient Care Record Keeping 
Review 


7 


DSUR 579E 


Current Literature Review 


3 


DSUR 588E 


Orthognathic Surgery Seminar 


3 


DSUR 589E 


Special Topics Seminar 


3 


DSUR 568G 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Rounds 


IS 


DSUR 568H 


Operating Room Advanced 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 


30 


DSUR 569G 


Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgical Grand Rounds 


2 



DSUR 578G 


Patient Care Record Keeping 
Review 


7 


DSUR 579G 


Current Literature Review 


3 


DSUR 588G 


Orthognathic Surgery Seminar 


3 


DSUR 589G 


Special Topics Seminar 


3 


DSUR 609 


Special Problems 


4 


DSUR 799 


Research 


2 



ORAL PATHOLOQY 

Refer to pages 46 to 47. 

ORTHODONTICS 

Objectives 

To prepare students for a career as an orthodontist 
in clinical practice and/or academics. 

To allow individuals to obtain substantial experi- 
ence in clinical care, teaching and research. 

To fulfill the educational requirements for specialty 
certification by the American Board of Ortho- 
dontics. 



Scope of Training 

Students gain experience in the treatment of pa- 
tients with all types of dentofacial deformities. A 
broad mastery of alternative techniques with differ- 
ent variations of the Edgewise appliance is empha- 
sized, along with modern forms of removable appli- 
ances. Surgical orthognathic cases are treated in 
conjunction with oral and maxillofacial surgery res- 
idents at the University of Maryland Medical Sys- 
tem and The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Treatment is 
provided for adults, adolescents and children in the 
mixed dentition. Students also provide orthodontic 
treatment in complex rehabilitation cases in coordi- 
nation with graduate students in prosthodontics 
and periodontics. 

Through an extensive series of lectures, seminars 
and case conferences, a comprehensive didactic 
background in relevant basic sciences and clinical 
orthodontics is provided. Each student, working 
with faculty supervisors chosen from the Dental 
School and university, must complete an original 
research project. Students serve as instructors in the 
predoctoral clinic and supervise minor tooth move- 
ment and space maintenance procedures. 




ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS. 33 




While pursuing a certificate in orthodontics, stu- 
dents will be enrolled in a Master of Science degree 
program in oral biology. Courses taken for the mas- 
ter's degree will satisfy certificate requirements. 

Site of Training 

Most of the clinical and didactic program takes 
place within the Dental School. Off-campus experi- 
ences include attendance at the craniofacial anom- 
alies clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital; the 
H. K. Cooper Center, Lancaster, Pennsylvania; the 
U.S. Army postgraduate program at Fort Meade, 
Maryland and at continuing education courses held 
throughout the greater Baltimore area. 



Number of Positions 
Three 



Faculty 

William M. Davidson, D.M.D., Ph.D., Chairman, 

Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics 
Stuart D. Josell, D.M.D., M. Dent. Sc, Program 

Director 
Albert Apicella, D.D.S., M.S. 
Ronald S. Branoff, D.D.S., M.S.D. 
Ross E. Long, D.M.D., Ph.D., Director of Orthodon- 
tics, Lancaster Cleft Folate Clinic 
Phillip S. Markin, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, Amen- 

can Board of Orthodontics 
C. Thomas Pavlick Jr., D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, 

American Board of Orthodontics 
Karl Pick, D.D.S. 
Constance G. Rubier, D.D.S. , M.S., Diplomate, 

American Board of Orthodontics 
Ronald Scornavaca, D.D.S. 
Bhavna Shroff, D.D.S., M. Dent. Sc. 
Richard Smith, D.M.D., M.S., M. Phil., Ph.D. 
Edgar Sweren, D.D.S., Diplomate, American Board of 

Orthodontics 
Steven M. Siegel, D.M.D. 
Alan S. Weisberg, D.D.S., Diplomate, American 

Board of Orthodontics 
Robert E. Williams, D.M.D., M.S., Diplomate, 

American Board of Orthodontics 

Length of Program 
Three years 



Curriculum 

YEAR 1 


CREDITS 


ORTH 567A 


Treatment Planning Seminar 


1 


ORTH 568A 


Diagnosis 


4 


ORTH 569A 


Clinic 


29 


ORTH 576A 


Typodont 


1 


ORTH 5 77 A 


Laboratory Technique 


1 


ORTH 5 78 A 


Case Presentation Seminar 


3 


ORTH 5 79 A 


Research 


7 


ORTH 586A 


Literature Review- 


1 


ORTH 587A 


Mixed Dentition 


2 


ORTH 588A 


Biomechanics 


: 


ORTH 589A 


Technique Seminars 


n 


ORTH 597A 


Ortho-Surgery Seminar 


: 


ORTH 598A 


Applied Teaching 


3 


PEDS 598A 


Development of Dentition 


2 


DANA 622 


Oral Histology and Embryology 


2 


DANA 633 


Temporomandibular Joint 


! 


DANA 638 


Data Analysis Research 


3 


DPHS 609 


Physiology Seminar 


1 


DPHS 639 


Oral Neurophysiology Seminar 


1 


YEAR II 


ORTH 568C 


Cleft Palate Clinic 


4 


ORTH 569C 


Clinic 


32 


ORTH 578C 


Case Presentation Seminars 


3 


ORTH 579C 


Research 


9 


PERI 579B 


Adult Tooth Movement 


3 


ORTH 586C 


Literature Review- 


1 


ORTH 589C 


Technique Seminars 


5 


ORTH 597C 


Ortho-Surgery Seminar 


2 


ORTH 598C 


Applied Teaching 


5 


DANA 618 


Special Problems in the 
Anatomies 


3 


DMIC 609 


Special Problems/Microbiology 


1 


CIPP905 


Normal Adolescent Growth 
and Development 


2 




M.S. Research 


2 




Graduate Electives 


3 



• :AL SCHOOL 



YEAR III 


CREDITS 


ORTH 569E 


Clinic 20 


ORTH 578E 


Case Presentation Seminar 3 


ORTH 579E 


Research 1 5 


ORTH 586E 


Literature Review 1 


ORTH 587C 


Practice Management 2 


ORTH 588E 


Biomechanics 1 


ORTH 597E 


Ortho-Surgery Seminar 2 


ORTH 598E 


Applied Teaching 1 5 


M.S. Research 4 



PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 

Objectives 

To prepare individuals for a career in the specialty 
of pediatric dentistry. 

To fulfill the educational requirements for specialty 
certification by the American Board of Pediatric 
Dentistry. 

To fulfill the requirements for specialty training of 
the Council on Dental Education (Commission 
on Dental Accreditation) of the American Den- 
tal Association. 



Scope of Training 

Lectures, seminars and conferences are held relating 
to pediatric patients and their dental treatment. 
Students receive training in hospital and operating 
room protocol, including the use of general anes- 
thetics in rendering total oral rehabilitation. They 
also gain teaching experience by serving as instruc- 
tors in the predoctoral laboratory and clinic. An 
original research project must be conducted by each 
candidate. 



Site of Training 

The major sites of training are the Dental School, 
the University of Maryland Medical System, Chil- 
dren's Hospital and Center for Reconstructive 
Surgery, Mercy Hospital and Maryland School for 
the Blind. 



dren's Hospital. All students provide comprehen- 
sive dental care to these handicapped patients and 
participate in conferences with the interdisciplinary 
and medical staffs. 

An operating room is utilized in the University 
of Maryland Medical System for training in render- 
ing rehabilitative dental care to patients who have 
received general anesthetics. 



Number of Positions 

Four 



Faculty 

James Rule, D.D.S., M.S., Chairman 

Preston Shelton, B.S., D.D.S., M.S., Program. Di- 
rector, Diplomate, American Board of Pediatric 
Dentistry 

Ronald Abrams, B.S., D.M.D., M.S. 

Ronald Ackerman, D.D.S. 

Sophis Balis, D.D.S. 

James Coll, D.M.D., M.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Pediatric Dentistry 

B. Casey Crafton, D.D.S., M.S. 

Edward Ginsberg, D.D.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Pediatric Dentistry 

Stuart Josell, D.M.D., M. Dent. Sc. 

Suzan Miller, D.D.S. 

Glenn Minah, D.D.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

David Owen, D.D.S., A.M. 

Earle Schulz, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Pediatric Dentistry (Dental Director, Chil- 
dren's Hospital) 

Mark Wagner, A.B., D.M.D. 

Special Admission (guidelines 

• Documentation of scholastic achievement and 
motivation. 

• Recommendations from individuals well ac- 
quainted with the candidate. 

• Professional experiences. 

• Personal interview. 



Length of Program 

Two years 



Facilities 

In addition to utilizing the individual private opera- 
tories in the Dental School, each postdoctoral stu- 
dent is assigned, on a scheduled basis, to the Chil- 



' EDUCATION PRO GRAMS. 35 



Curriculum 
YEAR I 


CREDITS 


PEDS 567A 


Pediatric Dentistry Orientation 


4 


PEDS 568A 


Research Methodology 


3 


PEDS 569A 


Research 


J 


PEDS 5 78 A 


Case Conference Seminar 


4 


PEDS 579A 


Special Topics Seminar 


6 


PEDS 589A 


Clinical Pedodontics 


36 


PEDS 598A 


Development of the Dentition 


2 


ORTH 567A 


Treatment Planning Seminar 


1 


ORTH 568A 


Diagnosis (Data Base) 


4 


ORTH 586A 


Literature Review 


2 


DANA 622 


Mammalian Oral 
Histology and Embryology 


2 


DANA 638 


Data Analysis Research 


3 


DMIC 609 


Special Problems/ 
Microbiology 


1 


DPAT612 


Special Problems/ 
Oral Pathology 


2 


DPAT613 


Special Problems/ 
Oral Pathology 


2 


DPHR 656 


Dental Toxicology 


: 


YEAR II 


PEDS 568D 


General Anesthesia 


4 


PEDS 569C 


Research 


7 


PEDS 578C 


Case Conference Seminar 


4 


PEDS 579C 


Special Topics Seminar 


3 


PEDS 588C 


Literature Review Seminar 


4 


PEDS 589C 


Clinical Pedodontics 


40 


PEDS 598C 


Applied Teaching 


2 



PERIODONTICS 

Objectives 

To provide special knowledge and skills beyond the 
accepted D.D.S. or D.M.D. training. 

To prepare the student to execute proficiently all 
skills of the specialty. 

To provide experiences in research and in the field 
of education. 



To fulfill the requirements for specialty training of 
the Council of Dental Education (Commission 
on Dental Accreditation) of the American Den- 
tal Association. 

To fulfill the educational requirements for specialty 
certification by the American Board of Peri- 
odontology. 




Scope of Training 

Students receive experience in the treatment of pa- 
tients with all types of periodontal disease, particu- 
larly advanced stages of the disease. Lectures, semi- 
nars and CPC conferences are held in diagnosis, 
prognosis, treatment planning and practice man- 
agement. Seminars are conducted with other spe- 
cialties to interrelate all fields of dentistry and med- 
icine; with guest consultants who are experts in 
their field; and with postdoctoral students in peri- 
odontics from other teaching institutions. Comple- 
tion of an original research project is required. 

Students become proficient in the placement of 
various implant systems and gain hospital experi- 
ence in the adjacent Veterans Affairs Medical Cen- 
ter. They also become proficient in all currently ac- 
cepted modalities of periodontal surgery and 
nonsurgical management of patients. Experience is 
provided in establishing and managing a recall sys- 
tem for treatment of patients with periodontal dis- 
ease. Also required are the preparation and docu- 
mentation of patient cases representative of those 
suitable for submission to the American Board of 
Periodontology. Students gain teaching experience 
by giving lectures and providing clinical instruction 
to predoctoral dental students. They also attend 
professional meetings and continuing education 
courses held in the Baltimore- Washington area. 



6 • DENTAl SCHOOl 



Site of Training 

The major sites of training are the Dental School, 
the Naval Dental Center, Bethesda, Maryland, and 
the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 



Number of Positions 

Four to five 



Faculty 

John J. Bergquist, D.D.S., M.S., Chairman, Diplo- 
mats, American Board of Periodontology 

Gerald M. Bowers, D.D.S., M.S., Program Director, 
Diplomats , American Board of Periodontology 

William Bowen, D.D.S., M.S. 

John Bruno, D.D.S., M.S. 

Sylvan Feldman, D.D.S., Diplomats, American Board 
of Periodontology 

Gregory Felthousen, D.D.S., Diplomats, American 
Board of Periodontology 

Lawrence S. Freilich, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Lawrence Halpert, D.D.S. 

Charles E. Hawley, D.D.S. , Ph.D., Diplomats, Amer- 
ican Board of Periodontology 

Gregory Horning, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, Ameri- 
can Board of Periodontology 

James Kassolis, D.D.S., Diplomats , American Board 
of Periodontology 

Sarah Park, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Periodontology 

William Parker, D.D.S., Diplomate, American Board 
of Periodontology 

Peter Passero, D.D.S. 

Brian Paul, D.M.D., M.S.Ed., Diplomats , American 
Board of Periodontology 

Bradley Phillips, D.M.D., Diplomate, American 
Board of Periodontology 

Leslie Robson, R.D.H., B.S. 

Paul Rosen, D.M.D., M.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Periodontology 

Robert Sachs, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Periodontology 

Arnold Sindler, D.D.S. 

Herbert Towle, D.D.S., Diplomate, American Board 
of Periodontology 

R. Dale Welch, D.D.S., Diplomate, American Board 
of Periodontology 

Dennis Winson, D.D.S., Diplomate, American Board 
of Periodontology 



Karl Zeren, D.D.S., Diplomate, American Board of 
Periodontology 

Robert Zupnik, D.D.S., M.S.D., Diplomate, Ameri- 
can Board of Periodontology 

Length of Program 

Three years (30 month minimum) 



Curriculum 

YEAR I 


CREDITS 


PERI 567A 


Intraoral Photography 


1 


PERI 568A 


Diagnosis, Prognosis and 
Treatment Planning 


4 


PERI 568B 


Conjoint Seminars 
(Implantology) 


5 


PERI 569A 


Case Management 


2 


PERI 569B 


Principles of Occlusion 


2 


PERI 578A 


Literature Review Seminar 


12 


PERI 578B 


Reconstructive Surgery 


2 


PERI 579A 


Surgical Techniques 


6 


PERI 579B 


Adult Tooth Movement 


3 


PERI 588A 


Clinic 


33 


PERI 588B 


Introduction to 
Periodontal Therapy 
and Molecular Biology 


3 


PERI 589A 


Research Methodology 


1 


DANA 614 


Anatomy of Head and Neck 


5 


DANA 622 


Oral Histology and Embryology 


2 


DANA 633 


Temporomandibular Joint 


1 


DANA 638 


Data Analysis Research 


3 


DMIC 609 


Special Problems 


1 


DMIC 622 


Immunology and Oral Diseases 


3 


DPAT612 


Oral Pathology Problems 


2 


DPAT613 


Oral Pathology Problems 


2 


DPHR 656 


Dental Toxicology 


2 


Research 1 


YEAR II 


PERI 568C 


Diagnosis, Prognosis and 
Treatment Planning 


4 


PERI 568D 


Conjoint Seminars 
(Implantology) 


2 




ADVANCED EDUCATION PRO GRAMS* 37 




PERI 569C 


Case Management 


2 


PERI 569D 


Practice Management 


: 


PERI 578C 


Literature Review 


12 


PERI 579C 


Advanced Surgical Techniques 


6 


PERI 588C 


Clinic 


31 


PERI 589C 


Research Methodology 


3 


PERI 598C 


Applied Teaching 


6 


DPAT616 


Advanced Histopathology 


3 


DPAT617 


Advanced Histopathology 


3 


Hospital Rotation 




Research 


3 


YEAR III 


PERI 588E 


Clinic 


20 


PERI 598E 


Applied Teaching 


3 


PERI 569E 


Case Management 


2 


PERI 578E 


Current Literature Review 


2 


Clinical Pathologic Conferences - 




Research 


3 



PROSTHODONTICS 

Objectives 

To provide a historical perspective of prosthodon- 
tics in a manner which will permit and encour- 
age the student to make objective evaluations. 

To provide a comprehensive background of those 
biologic and allied sciences relevant to diagnosis, 
planning and treatment of routine and complex 
prosthodontic problems. 

To provide clinical treatment experiences in the 
various aspects of prosthodontics with emphasis 
upon attainment of skills and judgment in treat- 
ing complex problems. 

To prepare the candidate for examination by the 
American Board of Prosthodontics. 

To prepare the candidate for teaching at predoc- 
toral or postgraduate levels. 

Scope of Training 

Students are trained to manage and treat complex 
prosthodontic problems effectively. Lectures, semi- 
nars and conferences are held in basic biologic sci- 
ences and allied dental sciences related to prostho- 
dontics. Teaching experience is gained by 



postgraduate students as they provide clinical in- 
struction to predoctoral dental students. Training 
in research methodology is an integral part of the 
program and culminates as each candidate conducts 
and presents an original research project. 

Site of Training 

Major site of training is the Dental School. 



Number of Positions 

Three 



Faculty 

Van P. Thompson, D.D.S., Ph.D., Chairman 

Mark M. Stevens, D.D.S., Program Director, Diplo- 
mate , American Board of Prosthodontics 

Marvin L. Baer, D.D.S., M.S., Diptarruzte, American 
Board of Prosthodontics 

Michael Conway, D.D.S., M.S., Diphmate, Ameri- 
can Board of Prosthodontics 

John Davliakos, D.M.D. 

Gerald W. Eastwood, D.M.D., M.A., Diphmate, 
American Board of Prosthodontics 

William Griswold, D.D.S., Diplomate, American 
Board of Prosthodontics 

Stuart D. Prymas, D.D.S. 

Harry Schwartz, D.D.S. 

Special Admission Quidelines 

• Students must have acceptable scholastic achieve- 
ment at the predoctoral level. 

• Clinical experience is preferred. 

• A personal interview is desirable. 

• References will be required. 



Length of Program 
Two years 



Curriculum 

YEAR I 


CREDITS 


PROS 567A 


Instructional Methodology 1 


PROS 568A 


Clinical Prosthodontics 32 


PROS 569A 


Literature Review Seminar 6 


PROS 578A 


Treatment Planning Seminar 4 


PROS 579A 


Applied Teaching in 

Removable Prosthodontics 4 



I \ I M IIOOI 



PROS 587A 


Research 




PROS 598A 


Advanced Dental Materials 




PERI 568B 


Conjoint Seminars 




DANA 614 


Anatomy of the Head 
and Neck 




DANA 618 


Spec/Biostatistics 




DANA 622 


Oral Histology and 
Embryology 


2 


DANA 633 


Temporomandibular Joint 




DMIC 609 


Special Problems 





DPAT612 


Oral Pathology Problems 


2 


DPAT613 


Oral Pathology Problems 


2 


DPHR 656 


Dental Toxicology 


2 


YEAR II 


CREDITS 


PROS 568C 


Clinical Prosthodontics 


56 


PROS 569C 


Literature Review Seminar 


6 


PROS 578C 


Treatment Planning Seminar 


4 


PROS 579C 


Applied Teaching in 
Removable Prosthodontics 


4 


PROS 588C 


Research 


2 


PROS 589C 


Applied Teaching in 
Fixed Restorative 


4 


PROS 597C 


Board Case Presentation 


1 


PERI 568D 


Conjoint Seminars 


1 



GENERAL DENTISTRY PROGRAMS 

Qeneral Information 

The Dental School offers the following residency 
programs: 

• Advanced Education in General Dentistry: a 
one-year residency program of dental school- 
based advanced study and practice; a two-year 
comprehensive program of advanced study with 
joint matriculation in the Master of Science in 
Oral Biology program. 

• General Practice Residency, one-year and two- 
year programs of hospital-based advanced study 
and dental practice. 

All residency programs meet accreditation re- 
quirements of the Council on Dental Education 
(Commission on Dental Accreditation) of the 
American Dental Association. 



Facilities 

The program in General Practice Residency is 
based in the department of dentistry of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Medical System. The Advanced 
Education in General Dentistry Program operates 
within the Dental School in its own clinic facility 
specially designed to include treatment areas as well 
as associated support areas. 

Financial Support 

Financial support for residents may be available. In- 
formation regarding this support can be obtained by 
writing to individual program directors. 

Requirements for Certification 

A certificate is awarded to candidates who have sat- 
isfied all requirements of the program and have paid 
all debts to the university. 

Academic Standards for Certification 

Students must demonstrate competency in all clini- 
cal and non-clinical areas of the program. Any stu- 
dent who fails to do so may not be permitted to 
continue in the program. 

Awards 

An award is presented to a resident at the Dental 
School Honors Convocation to recognize profi- 
ciency in the treatment of the medically compro- 
mised patient in advanced general dentistry. 



AI'VANCED EDUCATION P R O G R A M S • 39 



ADVANCED EDUCATION IN QENERAL 
DENTISTRY RESIDENCY 



Number of Positions: One-Year Program 
10 



Objectives 

To provide a clinical environment which will im- 
prove and reinforce clinical skills and knowledge 
in the practice of comprehensive general den- 
tistry. 

To provide an opportunity to participate in the 
management of a simulated private group prac- 
tice. 

To train the student, under the direction of an at- 
tending staff of general dentists and specialists, 
in the preparation of complex treatment plans 
and the performance of a wide range of clinical 
procedures. 

To provide experience in patient, personnel and 
practice management. 

Scope of Training: One-Year Program 

The clinical experiences for each student incorpo- 
rate a broad range of clinical cases and are designed 
to match specific needs and interests. The patients 
assigned are selected hy the faculty on the basis of 
type and complexity of treatment required. Stu- 
dents assume the responsibility for coverage of den- 
tal emergencies on a rotating basis. 

The Advanced Education in General Dentistry 
environment simulates a private group practice and 
is one in which students are exposed to new tech- 
niques and concepts in patient care. This atmos- 
phere is enhanced by ongoing clinical research in 
materials and devices, and the clinical treatment of 
Advanced Education in General Dentistry patients 
by attending faculty. Chairside dental auxiliaries, 
full-time hygienists, receptionist/clerks and finan- 
cial personnel facilitate the efficient delivery of ser- 
vices. Laboratory support is provided by technicians 
in commercial and Dental School laboratories. 

While students spend 80 percent of their time in 
the Advanced General Dentistry clinic practice 
facility, the remaining 20 percent is devoted to sem- 
inars which cover all dental specialties. These semi- 
nars are presented by senior faculty of the Dental 
School and private practitioners, as well as by the 
Advanced Education in General Dentistry faculty. 
Each student prepares and presents case reports and 
conducts literature review seminars. 



Scope of Training: Tu>o-Year Program 

This program pursues the one-year objectives while 
the curriculum is centered around matriculation in 
the Master of Science in Oral Biology program of- 
fered within the Dental School. The intent is to di- 
rect potential careers into education/research, ad- 
vanced general or specialty practice. At the same 
time students treat increasingly more difficult com- 
prehensive care patients, increase their level of in- 
dependent clinical activity and improve practice 
management skills. 

Research required for thesis development is usu- 
ally conducted in a clinical setting and offers a wide 
selection of interest areas such as ongoing materials 
studies based in restorative and esthetic dentistry, 
special patients, geriatrics, TMD and implantology. 
Additional opportunities may be specifically tai- 
lored to provide experiences at extramural training 
sites, and experience in pre-clinical and clinical 
teaching areas is provided. An additional six 
months to one year may be necessary beyond the 24 
month program to ensure completion of all require- 
ments for the Master of Science in Oral Biology. 




Number of Positions: Ttvo-Year Program 
One to two 



Site of Training 

The Advanced General Dentistry clinic is located 
on the ground floor of the Dental School. This new 
clinical facility, consisting of 38 units and all associ- 
ated support areas such .is reception, x-ray and labo- 



i . D E N T A 1 S C H O 1 



ratory, is designated for the exclusive use of the Ad- 
vanced Education in General Dentistry residency 
program. 

Faculty 

Lawrence W. Blank, D.D.S., Director 

Nilda Arceo, D.D.S. 

Douglas M. Barnes, D.D.S. 

David L. George, D.D.S. 

James C. Gingell, D.D.S., M.S. 

William Krell, D.D.S. 

Keith Schmidt, D.D.S. 

Gene Schlank, D.D.S. 

P. Jay Shires, D.D.S. 

Scott Swank, D.D.S. 

Leo V. Trail, D.D.S. 

Faedra Whining, D.D.S. 

QENERAL PRACTICE RESIDENCY 

Objectives 

To improve and refine the resident's knowledge and 
clinical skills in the practice of general dentistry, 
and provide the background to permit the resi- 
dent to practice general dentistry with reduced 
dependency upon specialists, minimizing patient 
referral. 

To prepare the resident to plan and deliver dental 
treatment, where specialists are required, with 
the generalist serving as the principal coordina- 
tor. 

To prepare the resident to assess the patient's gen- 
eral medical status and relate this status to antic- 
ipated dental treatment. 

To provide didactic and clinical training and expe- 
rience in patient, personnel and practice man- 
agement. 

To provide training and experience in the manage- 
ment and delivery of total oral health care to a 
wide range of ambulatory and hospitalized pa- 
tients. 

To provide instruction in the organization, opera- 
tion and services of the various hospital depart- 
ments. 

Scope of Training 

The department of dentistry is a department of the 
University of Maryland Medical System. It is within 
this department in the division of hospital dentistry 



that the General Practice Residency program func- 
tions. The Dental School provides faculty from its 
five basic science and 12 clinical science depart- 
ments to support the didactic and clinical compo- 
nents of the General Practice Residency program. 

The majority of a resident's time is spent in the 
clinic of the department of dentistry where a wide 
range of patients are treated under the supervision 
of the attending staff. The remaining time is de- 
voted to operating room experiences and hospital 
clinic practice in various settings. In addition, the 
residents receive the following experiences which 
account for 25 percent of the year: 

Anesthesia Rotation — A one-month rotation in 
anesthesia is given at Mercy Hospital, an affiliated 
institution located in downtown Baltimore. 

Oral Surgery Rotation — A one-month rotation in 
the oral surgery service provides the resident with 
an opportunity to be primarily involved with inpa- 
tient care. 

University of Maryland Cancer Center — The 

clinical branch of the Baltimore Cancer Research 
Center is a joint University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and Medical System program for research 
in the treatment of cancer. Patients are entered into 
research programs according to protocol so that new 
treatment modalities may be scientifically evalu- 
ated. Multidisciplinary studies, including chemo- 
therapy, immunotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, 
are currently being evaluated. Special facilities such 
as laminar air flow rooms for protection of granulo- 
cytopenic patients are available. In addition, granu- 
locyte and platelet transfusions are prepared and 
made available for appropriate patients. 

The center admits patients with acute leukemia, 
lymphoma, brain tumors and other solid tumors 
such as testicular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma 
and breast cancer. In conjunction with faculty of 
the Dental School, the resident assists in the dental 
management of these patients. 

Consultations — Exposure to patients with varying 
medical problems is achieved through regularly re- 
quested dental consultations from all units of the 
hospital. 

Operating Room — The general practice residents 
provide dental services in the operating room for 
patients whose dental needs require hospitalization 
and/or general anesthesia. Operating room time and 




ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 




beds are available to the general practice service for 
this use. 

Emergency Call — The General Practice Residency 
program provides 24-hour dental service for pa- 
tients who come to the emergency room or for re- 
ferrals from the Dental School and the Maryland 
Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems. 
Residents are on call nights and weekends on a ro- 
tation basis; sleeping quarters are provided for 
nights on call. 

Children's Hospital — Residents rotate in one- 
month cycles providing treatment to pediatric 
inpatients. 

Montebello Rehabilitation Hospital — All residents 
participate in a one-month rotation at the Monte- 
bello Rehabilitation Hospital. 

Approximately 15 percent of the scheduled time 
is spent in seminars. These seminars cover a wide 
range of advanced dental topics and are presented 
by senior faculty of the Dental School as well as by 
the attending staff. The residents participate in 
these seminars, including the preparation and pre- 
sentation of case reports and literature reviews. In 
addition each resident is required to prepare a paper 
suitable for publication or conduct a seminar. 

In the second year of the program the resident 
receives a higher level of training and more practi- 
cal experience with more complex cases. The resi- 
dent also assumes some teaching responsibilities. 



Site of Training 

University Hospital is a 785-bed teaching facility 
whose objective is to provide the highest quality of 
patient care, medical education and research to and 
for the citizens of the state of Maryland. Since its 
founding in 1823, the hospital has undergone a se- 
ries of major expansion projects culminating with 
the north hospital addition in 1973. 

University Hospital is a major referral center for 
practitioners throughout the state of Maryland, of- 
fering a broad spectrum of specialized services and 
sophisticated facilities which are presently unavail- 
able in many other hospitals. Patients may be re- 
ferred tor inpatient care or to any one of over 60 
clinics housed in the hospital, or they may use the 
emergency room which is staffed 24 hours a day for 
the rapid treatment of accident victims and criti- 
cally ill patients. Adjacent to the hospital is a heli- 
port, which serves the Maryland Institute for Emer- 



gency Medical Services Systems, and provides a 
means of receiving critically ill newborns for admis- 
sion to the intensive care unit of neonatal nursing. 



Facilities 

The General Practice Residency program is located 
in the clinic of the department of dentistry of the 
University of Maryland Medical System where 
there are three operatories for general dentistry and 
one for dental hygiene. In addition, the department 
of dentistry has four operatories for the oral and 
maxillofacial surgery training program as well as 
support facilities. All operatories are fully equipped 
for the practice of four-handed dentistry. 



D.D.S., Co-Clinical 



Number of Positions 

Six 



Faculty 

Dr. George H. Williams 

Chief 
Dr. James R. Hupp, Co-Clinical Chief 
Attending Staff: 

E. L. Crooks, D.D.S., Program Director 
J. J. Bergquist, D.D.S., M.S. 
Neville McDonald, D.D.S., M.S. 
Robert A. Ord, D.D.S., M.D. 
J. D. Vandermer, D.D.S. 

Specific Admission (guidelines 

• Applicants must rank in the upper 1/3 of their 
dental class. 

• An interview is required. 

• Letters of recommendation are required. 

Length of Program 

One year/two years 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Qeneral Information 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Science 
(M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees 
are offered in anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, 
oral pathology and physiology. A Master of Science 
degree is also offered by the department of dental 
hygiene. The most recent addition to the Dental 
School's graduate program is a combined D.D.S./ 



42. DENTAL SCHOOL 



Ph.D. in physiology, the purpose of which is to train 
students to become dental researchers for careers in 
academic dentistry. 

A Ph.D. program in oral and craniofacial biology 
(and accompanying M.S.) is expected to be avail- 
able in the summer of 1995. Within this program 
the student may focus on one of three tracks: 
1) craniofacial morphology and function (func- 
tional and developmental morphology of the orofa- 
cial region, brain processes and underlying sensation 
and motor control); 2) oral molecular, cellular and 
systems biology (biochemical, molecular, cellular 
processes related to craniofacial biology); or 3) oral 
infectious disease (bacterial, viral or fungal diseases 
of the orofacial region, and immunology and patho- 
genetic mechanisms of such infectious disease). 

Programs are also available for those who wish to 
pursue a graduate degree in the basic sciences con- 
currently with clinic specialty education. The com- 
bined degree/specialty training program generally 
requires three years for the master's degree and five 
years for the doctorate. These programs are highly 
individualized and are developed according to the 
candidate's needs. 

A Master of Science in Oral Biology program is 
available for graduate students who are enrolled in 
the certificate programs in the Dental School (en- 
dodontics, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, peri- 
odontics, prosthodontics) or any persons holding a 
D.D.S., D.M.D. or equivalent degree. The program 
is a multidisciplinary one, in that the graduate 
courses necessary to satisfy the requirements of the 
University of Maryland Graduate School, Balti- 
more for the master's degree are selected from the 
various departments of the university. Students who 
fulfill all requirements of this program are awarded 
the Master of Science degree from the University of 
Maryland. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYQIENE 

The Master of Science degree program in dental hy- 
giene is designed to prepare dental hygienists to as- 
sume positions of responsibility beyond those as- 
sumed by the graduate from a baccalaureate program 
and to provide a foundation for those who wish to 
pursue a doctoral degree. The program's approach to 
learning is student-centered, individualized and 
flexible. The faculty is committed to facilitating the 
development of creative professionals who assess 
and direct their own performance. Self-evaluation 
and self-direction are encouraged throughout the 



program. Students have the opportunity to share 
their experiences, knowledge and skills; to work co- 
operatively with colleagues; and to explore a variety 
of resources to help them reach their maximum po- 
tential as health care professionals. 

Program concentrations include education, 
management and community/institutional health. 
Students in the health concentration may choose 
to focus on acute/hospital care or chronic/geriatric 
care. Within each concentration, practical career- 
oriented applications of knowledge and theory are 
emphasized. 

The Curriculum 

Full-time students can expect to complete the grad- 
uate program in 12 to 15 months. Part-time stu- 
dents usually spend 24 to 30 months in the pro- 
gram. Based on their career interests, students may 
select the thesis or the non-thesis option. Students 
in the thesis track must complete a total of 30 se- 
mester credits; those in the non-thesis track com- 
plete 34 credits. Under the guidance of a thesis 
advisor and committee, thesis students design, im- 
plement and defend a research project for a total of 
six credits. Non-thesis students, under the guidance 
of an advisor, submit a scholarly paper. 



Dental Hygiene Core 


THESIS 


NON-THESIS 


Requirements 


OPTION 


OPTION 


Educational Program 






Development 


3 


3 


Health Care Managemen 


3 


3 


Literature Review and 






Evaluation for Dental 






Hygienists 


3 


3 


Research Design and 






Methodology 


3 


3 


Area of Concentration 






Practicum 


4 


4 


Master's Thesis/Research 






or Research Practicum 


6 


3 


Electives 


8 


15 


Total 


30 


34 



Core Courses 

DHYG 414. Educational Program Development 
(3). Students in this course have the opportunity to 
explore various ways in which effective instruc- 
tional skills may contribute to a career in dental hy- 
giene. Learning experiences are designed to enable 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS. -I? 




the student to develop these skills and to project 
their application in such areas as public school sys- 
tems, community health programs, higher educa- 
tion and consumer education. 

DHYG 426. Health Care Management (3). Stu- 
dents are introduced to skills essential for effective 
management in their personal and professional 
roles. Areas of emphasis include the dental team 
environment, managerial planning and decision- 
making, fiscal issues, career planning, resumes and 
interviewing. Management principles are applied to 
a variety of oral health care delivery settings. 

DHYG 601. Seminar: Literature Review and 
Evaluation for Dental Hygienists (3). Through an 
analysis and critique of literature pertinent to the 
dental hygienist, students examine biological and 
clinical, research and political, sociological and ed- 
ucational trends that influence dental hygiene. 
Unanswered research questions are identified. 

DHYG 799. Master's Thesis Research (6). 

NURS 701. Research Methods and Materials (3). 
In one four-hour lecture/lab a week, basic under- 
standing of the philosophy of research, the nature of 
scientific thinking and methods of research study 
are taught. Prerequisite: Basic Statistics. 



Practicum Options (based on concentration 
selected) 

DHYG 619. Teaching Practicum (2-4). Graduate 
students, working with a faculty advisor, gain expe- 
rience teaching in didactic, clinical and/or labora- 
tory settings. An analytical approach to teaching ef- 
fectiveness is emphasized. Placements in junior 
colleges, baccalaureate programs, elementary or sec 



ondary schools or the Dental School are arranged 
according to each student's career goals. 

DHYG 629. Health Care Management Practicum 

(2-4). In cooperation with a faculty advisor, gradu- 
ate students observe and participate in the adminis- 
trative activities of a health care program. Place- 
ments are arranged to support the student's career 
goals. 

DHYG 639. Advanced Clinical Practice 
Practicum (2-4). Graduate students work with a 
faculty advisor to gain knowledge and experience in 
an advanced clinical area of dental hygiene prac- 
tice, such as nutritional analysis and counseling, pe- 
riodontics or orthodontics. 

DHYG 649. Research Practicum (2-4). Graduate 
students, working in conjunction with a faculty ad- 
visor, gain experience in research design and imple- 
mentation by participating in an on-going research 
project of interest to the student. Scientific writing 
experience will be included. 

Elective Offerings 

Electives may be chosen from the courses offered by 
the schools and departments at any of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland campuses in Baltimore, Baltimore 
County and College Park. Electives that apply to 
the concentrations of teaching, management, and 
community/institutional health must be approved 
by the student's faculty advisor prior to registration. 

Expenses and Financial Assistance 

Tuition is $196 per credit hour for in-state residents 
and $353 per credit hour for non-residents. The fol- 
lowing additional fees are also assessed: Student 
Government Association fee, $15; transporation 
fee, $20; student activities fee, $25; supporting facil- 
ities fee, $199. Financial aid, in the form of loans, 
grants and work study is awarded on the basis of 
demonstrated need. A limited number of part-time 
graduate teaching positions may be available 
through the department, and university fellowships 
may be available from the graduate school. A fel- 
lowship is also available from the American Dental 
Hygienists' Association Institute for Oral Health. 
Part-time employment opportunities for dental hy- 
giene practice are excellent in the community. 



44 • D E N T A 1 S C H O 1 



Admission and Application Procedures 
Admission to graduate study is the exclusive respon- 
sibility of the University of Maryland Graduate 
School, Baltimore. The minimum standard tor ad- 
mission is a B average, or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, as an un- 
dergraduate student in a program o{ study leading to 
a baccalaureate degree. Students who fail to meet 
these minimum requirements may be admitted to 
graduate study as provisional students. Applicants 
must be graduates of an accredited program in dental 
hygiene and possess a baccalaureate degree in dental 
hygiene or a related field. A personal interview with 
the program director is strongly recommended. 

Three copies of the application for admission, 
three letters of recommendation and two sets of of- 
ficial transcripts from each college or university at- 
tended must be received by the University of Mary- 
land Graduate School, Baltimore, by April 1 for 
admission in the fall semester and by October 1 for 
admission in the spring semester. 

For more information about the Master of Sci- 
ence degree program in dental hygiene, write: Grad- 
uate Program Director, Department of Dental Hy- 
giene, 666 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ORAL BIOLOGY 

The Master of Science in Oral Biology (MSOB) 
program is designed for dentists who wish to pursue 
a master's degree combining graduate education 
with a postgraduate specialty certificate program 
(combined certificate/MSOB program) or who may 
wish to pursue a Master of Science degree in Oral 
Biology (MSOB) only. 



Objectives 

To provide graduate training at the master's level 
for individuals holding a professional degree in 
dentistry. 

To provide dentists with an interdisciplinary gradu- 
ate foundation in the biological and clinical sci- 
ences for careers in dental research, dental edu- 
cation, the practice of dentistry or a dental 
specialty. 

Scope of Training 

Students receive graduate training in the basic sci- 
ences. Although lecture courses comprise most of 
the curriculum, many of the basic science courses 



include a laboratory component. A significant por- 
tion of the program is devoted to the design and 
completion of a thesis research project, which is a 
requirement of the program. Students have the op- 
portunity to select research advisors from several 
disciplines and research topics from many basic and 
clinical sciences. 



Site and Facilities 

The primary training site is the Dental School, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore. The disci- 
plines of anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, 
pathology, pharmacology and physiology are in- 
cluded as regular departments of the school. Thus, 
laboratory space and equipment are readily avail- 
able for student training. Facilities are also available 
at other schools of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore as well as the University of Maryland 
Baltimore County and College Park campuses. 

Length of Program 

MSOB students should be able to complete the re- 
quirements of this program within two years. 
MSOB/certificate students should be able to com- 
plete the requirements of both programs within 
three years. 

Faculty 

Over 60 Dental School professors who are members 
of the graduate faculty participate in this program. 
Faculty of other schools of the university are also 
involved. 



Academic Advisors 

Students enrolled in the combined certificate/ 
MSOB program will have their respective specialty 
program director as their academic advisor. Stu- 
dents enrolled in the MSOB program only will have 
the chairman of the Graduate Oversight Commit- 
tee as their academic advisor. 



Admission Requirements 

• Applicants must possess a Doctor of Dental 
Surgery, Doctor of Dental Medicine or equiva- 
lent degree and must fulfill requirements for ad- 
mission to the University of Maryland Graduate 
School, Baltimore. 




ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAM- • 4- 



• Application information for the MSOB program 
may be obtained from the University of Mary- 
land Graduate School, Baltimore, 5401 Wilkens 
Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21228. 

• Applicants for the combined certificate/MSOB 
program must first apply and gain admission to 
the clinical specialty program of their choice. 
Applications for the specialty certificate pro- 
grams may be obtained by contacting the Office 
of Admissions and Recruitment, Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore, 666 West Balti- 
more Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. After 
gaining admission to the specialty program, the 
individual must apply to the University of Mary- 
land Graduate School, Baltimore for admission 
to the MSOB portion of the combined program. 

Curriculum 

Students enrolled in either the MSOB program or 
the combined certificate/MSOB program are re- 
quired to have a minimum of 30 semester hours in 
courses acceptable for credit towards a graduate de- 
gree, including six hours of thesis research credit at 
the 799 level. At least 12 credit hours must be se- 
lected from courses numbered 600 or above. 
Courses below 600 must be approved by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore in 
order to be acceptable for graduate credit. Students 
admitted to the MSOB program only will be re- 
quired to follow an interdisciplinary core curricu- 
lum of 15 credits. 

More specific information pertaining to this 
master's degree program may be obtained by con- 
tacting the chairman o{ the Graduate Oversight 
Committee, Department of Oral and Craniofacial 
Biological Sciences, Anatomy Section, University 
of Maryland Dental School, 666 West Baltimore 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND DOCTOR OF 
PHILOSOPHY IN ORAL PATHOLOQY 

Objectives 

To prepare individuals for an academic career in the 

discipline of clinical and experimental oral 

pathology. 
To fulfill educational requirements for specialty 

certification by the American Board of Oral 

Pathology. 



Scope of Training 

In this unique program, which is one of only 14 na- 
tionally accredited programs, students receive expe- 
rience and training in surgical oral pathology, clini- 
cal oral pathology and the basic sciences. An 
extensive series of lectures, seminars and case con- 
ferences are conducted to provide a comprehensive 
curriculum that meets the requirements both for 
American Board certification and the confirmation 
of a graduate degree from the University of Mary- 
land Graduate School, Baltimore. 

A faculty advisor is assigned to guide each candi- 
date through the didactic curriculum and research 
thesis. Students are encouraged to complete the 
thesis academic degree program although a non- 
thesis option is available. Research interests of the 
faculty include: connective tissue, bone, stress pro- 
teins, retroviruses and epidemiology of oral disease. 

Site of Training 

Most clinical training is conducted within the de- 
partment of oral pathology of the University of 
Maryland Dental School. Didactic courses are 
taken in various schools on the University of Mary- 
land Baltimore campus and at the Baltimore 
County campus. Electives and special courses may 
also be taken at the University of Maryland College 
Park campus or at The Johns Hopkins University. 
All of the above sites, as well as the National Insti- 
tute of Health, the National Library of Medicine 
and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in the 
Washington area, may serve as resources for the de- 
velopment and completion of the research thesis. 



Number of Positions 

No limit 



Faculty 

John J. Sauk, D.D.S., M.S., Chairman, Diplomate, 

American Board of Oral Pathology 
Russell L. Corio, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, American 

Board of Oral Pathology 
Ross Couwenhoven, D.D.S., Ph.D. 
Bernard A. Levy, D.D.S., M.S., Diplomate, Ameri- 

can Board of Oral Pathology 
Robert S. Redman, D.D.S., M.S.D., Ph.D., Diplo- 

mate, American Board of Oral Pathology 



46.DENTAL Si 



Length of Program 

M.S., three years 
Ph.D., four years 

Special Requirements 

D.D.S., D.M.D., or equivalent degree 

Curriculum 

DPAT 612, 613, Special Problems in Oral 
Pathology (2,2) One lecture and one laboratory pe- 
riod per week. The histopathology of selected oral 
lesions with emphasis on recent advances in diag- 
nostic techniques. 

DPAT 614, 615 Methods in Histopathology 

(4,4) Two four-hour laboratory periods each week. 
The laboratory methods used in preparing patho- 
logic tissues for microscopic examination. 

DPAT 616, 617 Advanced Histopathology of 
Oral Lesions (3,3) One hour of lecture and four 
hours of laboratory each week. The study of uncom- 
mon and rare lesions of the head and neck. 

DPAT 618 Seminar (1) One period each week. 
Recent advances in oral pathology. 

The prerequisite for all courses above is a basic 
course in pathology. Approved electives will sup- 
plement these courses until the credit requirements 
of the program are met. 

DPAT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-12) 

DPAT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-12) 



CONTINUING DENTAL EDUCATION 

The Dental School offers a diverse curriculum of 
continuing education courses designed to update, 
refresh and reinforce the professional knowledge 
and skills of practicing dentists, hygienists and of- 
fice staff. The most current clinical, biological, so- 
cial and behavioral sciences and practice manage- 
ment knowledge is included in the course offerings. 
Courses are conducted mainly by the school's fac- 
ulty with occasional participation by distinguished 
practitioners from throughout the country. Contin- 
uing education credits are awarded for all courses 
to recognize attendance and participation in these 
activities. 

A significant number of the on-campus courses 
are laboratory or clinical hands-on courses. An in- 
creasing number of off-campus courses are being 
provided for dental professionals located in subur- 
ban and rural areas of the state. 




ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS • 47 



Student Life 




STUDENT SERVICES 

Office of Academic Affairs 

The office of academic affairs, under the direction 
of the senior associate dean, is the source of student 
information about the academic program and is the 
repository for records of student academic perfor- 
mance. A major function of the office is to coordi- 
nate the academic counseling and guidance pro- 
grams of the school. Departmental academic 
counseling and progress reports are maintained and 
monitored. Records concerning counseling, refer- 
rals and disposition are maintained and serve as a 
resource of academic evaluation by the faculty and 
administration. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, examination 
schedules and the academic calendar are dissemi- 
nated through this office. Examples of program in- 
formation distributed to students include handouts 
about course offerings, course credits, and guidelines 
for the selection of students for clerkship programs. 

Official class rosters and student personal data 
and address files are maintained by the office of aca- 
demic affairs, which serves as a liaison between the 
Dental School and the university registrar for the 
coordination of registration procedures. 

The office is also responsible for coordination of 
a computerized grading system which (a) provides 
each advancement committee with a composite re- 
port on all students in the class at the end of each 
semester; (b) provides, on request, class rankings 
and other evaluation data; and (c) operates in con- 
junction with the university's office of records and 
registration, which generates and distributes indi- 
vidual grade reports, maintains the student's perma- 
nent record and issues the official transcript. 



Office of Admissions and Student Affairs 

The office of admissions and student affairs, under 
the direction of the assistant dean for admissions 
and student affairs, is either directly or indirectly in- 
volved with all aspects of student life and welfare at 
the Dental School. The office manages the admis- 
sions of students for all programs and continues to 
work with students throughout their years at the 
Dental School. 

Students who experience career, health, legal, 
employment, housing and other personal problems 
are counseled by the assistant dean for admissions 
and student affairs and referred, as necessary, to the 
appropriate campus agency or office. In addition, 



counseling concerning specialty training, military 
service, internships, dental education and dental re- 
search careers is available to predoctoral dental and 
dental hygiene students through the Center for Ca- 
reer Development and Placement. 

The assistant dean for admissions and student af- 
fairs serves as advisor to all student organizations 
and publications and also assists in the coordination 
of joint student-faculty programs (professional, so- 
cial and cultural). The Student Affairs Committee 
of the Faculty Council has the major responsibility 
for such programs. 

To effectively conduct all student affairs, the of- 
fice of admissions and student affairs maintains di- 
rect liaison with all administrators, as well as cam- 
pus, community and professional organizations and 
agencies. 



Office of Clinical Affairs 

All intramural and extramural clinical programs of 
the Dental School are coordinated by the office of 
clinical affairs. Major functions of this office include 
coordinating the schedules of faculty from the vari- 
ous disciplines to each general practice, scheduling 
the rotation of students to special assignments, as- 
signing patients to students, maintaining patient 
records, and assuming responsibility for continuous 
improvement, quality, patient advocacy and clini- 
cal information management. 

Patient visits to the predoctoral clinics o{ the 
Dental School exceed 60,000 annually. Through 
the office of clinical affairs, assistance is provided to 
students and patients who encounter difficulties. 
Central Materials Services, Central Records Sys- 
tems, personnel and financial management associ- 
ated with the operation of the teaching clinics are 
additional responsibilities coordinated through this 
office. 



Instructional Support Services 
Instructional Support Services (ISS) has as its pri- 
mary objective the provision of instructional sup- 
port for all areas of the dental curriculum. The goal 
of ISS is to apply the principles of management to 
the process of education in order to maintain a con- 
stant focus on the quality of the education being 
provided students pursuing a career in dentistry or 
denial hygiene. A fully equipped Independent 
Learning Center housing study carrels and a wide 
variety of audiovisual equipment used in conjunc- 



DENTAI SCHOOL 



tion with assigned curricular materials is also avail- 
able. Consultation on the development of instruc- 
tional packages and media applications is provided 
to dental school faculty and students. 

The Independent Learning Center is open more 
than 65 hours a week including evenings and Satur- 
days and provides a comfortable atmosphere for in- 
dependent study. Students, faculty and practitioners 
are welcome to use these facilities at any time. 




Student and Employee Health 

The school provides medical care for its students 
through Student and Employee Health, located in 
suite 160 of the University of Maryland Professional 
Building, 419 West Redwood Street. Coverage is 
provided around-the clock by family physicians and 
nurse practitioners. Gynecological services, includ- 
ing health maintenance and family planning are 
available. Hepatitis B immunization, required for all 
dental and dental hygiene students, is administered 
through Student and Employee Health. 

All full-time students are required to have health 
insurance. An excellent insurance policy is avail- 
able through UMAB that provides wide coverage, 
including obstetrical care. The cost of most of the 
care provided at Student and Employee Health is 
paid for through the student health fee. 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center provides professional indi- 
vidual and group counseling to UMAB students. 
Some of the problems that students seek help with 
include: stress, relationships, drugs or alcohol, eat- 
ing disorders, loss of a loved one and stressful 
changes in school or home life. 



Students are always seen by a professional — so- 
cial worker, psychologist, psychiatrist or addictions 
counselor. Costs associated with seeing a therapist 
usually are covered by health insurance; however, 
no one is ever denied services based on ability to 
pay. All Counseling Center services are completely- 
confidential. 



University Office of Student Affairs 

The university office of student affairs, Baltimore 
Student Union, room 336, assists physically chal- 
lenged students with academic and nonacademic 
support services. Staff members will work with the 
student and the school to provide interpreters, note 
takers, parking and other support related to class- 
room activities. Services depend on individual needs 
and support required for successful matriculation. 

The office is equipped with a TTY device to 
communicate with hearing impaired individuals. 
TTY is available for use by hearing impaired stu- 
dents while they are on campus. Accessible on- 
campus housing is available in the Pascault Row 
apartments. For more information, contact the uni- 
versity office of student affairs at 706-7714 (voice 
TTY). 



Housing 

Baltimore is a fun, friendly city with many afford- 
able and convenient housing options. The brochure 
Living in Baltimore describes on- and off-campus 
options for UMAB students; it is available through 
most UMAB admissions offices or by calling the 
residence life office at (410) 706-7766. 

The Baltimore Student Union, with dormitory 
style accommodations, and Pascault Row Apart- 
ments are two university-owned on-campus housing 
complexes. Privately owned unfurnished apart- 
ments are also available in several on-campus loft 
district buildings. 

Many students choose to live in neighborhoods 
surrounding the UMAB campus. Room, apartment 
and home listings are available through the student 
life office. Moreover, the University sponsors a 
shuttle service (the Caravan) which provides trans- 
portation to students in the surrounding neighbor- 
hoods to and from campus seven days a week. 

On-campus parking is available to students. 
Commuting students must obtain a parking permit 
from the parking services office, then pay the estab- 
lished daily rate when parking in the garage. Stu- 



STUDENT LIFE. 49 



dents who live in on-campus housing pay for park- 
ing by the semester or year and are guaranteed 24- 
hour parking in a garage adjacent to their residence 
facility. Public transportation makes the campus ac- 
cessible by bus, subway and light rail. 

Athletic Facilities 

The Athletic Center at UMAB is located on the 
10th floor of the Pratt Street Garage. The facility is 
equipped with one squash court, two racquetball/ 
handball courts and two basketball courts which 
may also be used for volleyball. In addition, there is 
a weight room with two 15-station universal gyms, 
stationary bikes and rowing and stair machines. 
Both men's and women's locker rooms are equipped 
with saunas and showers. 

Men's basketball, co-ed intramural basketball 
and volleyball teams compete throughout the fall 
and spring semesters. The Athletic Center also 
sponsors squash and racquetball tournaments and 
offers co-ed aerobic classes. UMAB students with a 
current and valid I.D. are admitted free. For addi- 
tional information, contact the athletic manager at 
706-3902. 

The Baltimore Student Union 

The Baltimore Student Union serves as a cultural 
and social center for students, faculty, staff, alumni 
and guests. Activities hosted by the union include 
meetings, dances, movies and special events. The 
multi-purpose Baltimore Student Union houses the 
campus offices of student financial aid, records and 
registration, student affairs, USGA, student life, 
residence life and off-campus housing. The book- 
store, union cafe, gameroom, credit union, meeting 
and party rooms, lounge space and residence halls 
also are located in the union. 

Office of Student Life 

The office of student life plans and implements 
campus-wide activities that enhance the quality of 
student life. Program initiatives are targeted in four 
major areas. 

• Campus-wide programs and activities are open 
to everyone. These social activities provide op- 
portunities to bring students from other acade- 
mic disciplines together. New student harbor 
cruises, Fallfest, Winterfest and commencement 
cruises have become campus traditions. Show- 
case lectures featuring leading personalities such 



as Dr. Bernie Siegel, Dr. Ruth Westheimer and 
Dr. Cornel West are offered throughout each se- 
mester at no charge. Comedy concern, mixers 
and dances are also included each year. 

• International student programs and services are 
designed to acclimate international students to 
their new home away from home. Efforts include 
orientation workshops, handbooks, language 
seminars, and advising the International Student 
Organization, which also sponsors social activi- 
ties. 

• Healthwatch sponsors informative activities and 
services for students on topics related to healthy 
life choices while connecting people to the 
many resources in the university community. 
Weekly lunchtime seminars are offered for stu- 
dents and are presented by campus faculty. 

• Off-campus housing listings are generated, cata- 
logued and updated weekly for students looking 
for convenient and affordable accommodations 
in the surrounding neighborhoods of UMAB. 

STUDENT POLICIES 

Student Judicial Policy 

Statement of Ethical Principles, Practices, and 
Behaviors 

Listed below are examples of principles and behav- 
iors that the academic community of the Dental 
School, consisting of both faculty and students, 
considers generally valid. No such statement can 
ever be complete, nor can it be construed as a com- 
prehensive code of professional conduct. Rather, it 
is intended as a guide to live by for those who are a 
part of the academic community. 

• Each member of this community is obliged to 
carry out his or her designated responsibilities 
within the rules and governance structure 
adopted and agreed to by the community as a 
whole. 

• Faculty and students should be concerned with 
their own competence and strive to improve 
themselves in the integration and transmission 
of knowledge. 

• In contributing to the information base of the 
sciences, whether verbally or by written commu- 
nication, students and faculty should present 
data, interpretations of data, and other facets of 
scholarly discovery with honesty and integrity. 

• Professional relations among all members of the 
community should be marked by civility. Thus, 



50 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



scholarly contributions should be acknowledged, 
slanderous comments and acts should be ex- 
punged, and each person should recognize and 
facilitate the contributions of others to this com- 
munity. 

• Each member of the community, when acting as 
an evaluator of any other member, should recog- 
nize unprofessional personal bias and eliminate 
its effect on the evaluation. 

• The validity of evaluation shall not be compro- 
mised by any departure from the published 
and/or generally understood rules of conduct. 
Thus, all manner of cheating on examinations or 
the presentation of work assumed to be one's 
own but done by another are unacceptable be- 
haviors. 

• An individual may challenge or refuse to comply 
with a directive whose implementation would 
not be in keeping with generally held ethical 
principles. 

• An individual should report his or her limitation 
of knowledge or experience if either limitation is 
likely to compromise an effort or expected result. 

• Faculty and students should seek consultation 
whenever it appears that the quality of profes- 
sional service may be enhanced thereby. 

• Students should seek consultation and supervi- 
sion whenever their care of a patient may be 
compromised because of lack of knowledge 
and/or experience. 

• Students and faculty must merit the confidence 
of patients entrusted to their care, rendering to 
each a full measure of service and devotion. 

• All patients should be treated with dignity and 
respect. 

• An individual or group of individuals should not 
abuse their power by extending it beyond its de- 
fined or generally accepted limits. 

• To the extent practical, sanctions for violations 
of these principles shall affect only individuals 
found to have committed the violations and 
shall not affect other persons. 

Professional Code of Conduct 

This academic community has interrelated respon- 
sibilities of producing and disseminating new scien- 
tific knowledge, teaching, caring for patients, and 
educating individuals to carry on these same func- 
tions. In carrying out these responsibilities, the aca- 
demic community needs rules to guide the mainte- 
nance of high standards. These must be nurtured by 




individuals with a developed sense of honor, in- 
tegrity, and intellectual honesty. It is incumbent 
upon the academic community to provide an envi- 
ronment which fosters these attributes in students 
and faculty members. 

It is important that faculty and students in a 
health profession realize that in our society the 
health practitioner functions mainly on the basis of 
self-discipline, rather than on imposed regulation, 
and receives a high degree of public confidence and 
trust. By accepting a professional code of conduct, 
which represents this trust, the faculty member and 
student demonstrate the desire to be fully prepared 
for the obligation to the dental profession and to 
the people served. As is traditionally expected of all 
health professionals, faculty members and students 
will demonstrate the highest standards of integrity 
at all times. Faculty and students are expected at all 
times to conduct themselves in accordance with all 
codes, rules and regulations of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University 
of Maryland at Baltimore. 

Student Offenses of the Professional Code of Conduct 
The following behaviors, while not all inclusive, are 
examples of student offenses of the Professional 
Code of Conduct: 

• Unprofessional Conduct. Including, but not lim- 
ited to, all forms of conduct which fail to meet 
the standards of the dental profession, lack of 
personal cleanliness, use of abusive language or 
behavior, disruption of class or any other school 
activity, and/or violation of the Dental School 
dress code. 

• Academic Misconduct. All forms of student aca- 
demic misconduct including, but not limited to, 
plagiarism, cheating on examinations, violation 



STUDENT LIFE 




of examination procedures, and submitting work 
for evaluation that is not one's own effort. 

• Dishonesty. Including knowingly furnishing false 
information through forgery-, alteration or misuse 
of documents or records with intent to deceive; 
presenting written or oral statements known to 
be false; loaning, transferring, altering or other- 
wise misusing university identification materials. 

• Theft or Destruction of Property. Including 
unauthorized possession or receiving of property 
that does not belong to the individual, such as 
instruments and books, or destruction of prop- 
erty not belonging to the individual. 

• Forcible entry into university facilities. 

• Intentional infliction or threat of bodily harm. 

• Possession of illegal drugs or weapons. 

• Aiding or Abetting. Including conspiring with 
or knowingly aiding or abetting another person 
to engage in any unacceptable activity. 

• Violation of any codes, rules, and regulations of 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 
The sections of the Student Judicial Policy in- 
cluded in this bulletin are intended to provide ex- 
amples of the high standards of conduct expected of 
a professional and the offenses against these stan- 
dards. The remaining sections of the policy describe 
specific examination procedures and procedures for 
considering infractions against the Professional 
Code of Conduct. The Student Judicial Policy in its 
entirety is sent to each admitted student. Accep- 
tance to the Dental School is contingent upon the 
understanding and acceptance of the tenets con- 
tained in the Student Judicial Policy and Profes- 
sional Code of Conduct. 



Dress Regulations 

It i> important to maintain a favorable and profes- 
sional image of the Dental School as a professional 
health care center. To that end, all levels of em- 
ployees and students within the building are ex- 
pected to dress and maintain a personal cleanliness 
that is consistent with a professional patient care 
oriented atmosphere. 

The following regulations apply to all employees 
and students. These regulations apply in all areas of 
Hayden-Harris Hall and all affiliated sites during 
the business days when clinics and classes are 
scheduled: 

• Informal attire such as denim jeans are not per- 
mitted. Shorts o) any type are not acceptable. 



Athletic shoes are generally not permitted, ex- 
cept when worn with scrub attire. 

• All students will wear lab coats and clinic jackets 
provided by the school. Jackets will be worn in 
all pre-clinical labs, the Clinical Simulation 
Unit, and in all clinical areas. A new clinic 
jacket will be worn each day; the jacket will be 
changed immediately should it become visibly 
stained or contaminated with bloodborne 
pathogens. 

• Surgical scrub attire may be worn while students 
are providing patient care, provided that a clean 
white clinic jacket is worn over the scrubs, and 
the scrubs are obtained from the Dental School 
store. Clean white athletic shoes may be worn 
with scrub attire. Scrubs may not be worn out- 
side Hayden-Harris Hall, except when students 
are going to or from a clinical rotation. Scrub at- 
tire may be worn only if the approved shirt and 
pants are worn together. 

• Men will wear clean, neat slacks and collared 
shirts. Neckties will be required in clinical set- 
tings. Preclinical students will not be required to 
wear neckties in nonclinical situations. 

• Women will wear clean attire, appropriate for a 
professional environment. Split skirts and full- 
cut dressy shorts are acceptable, provided they 
are no shorter than two inches above the knee 
and are worn with hose or tights. Otherwise, 
women are not required to wear hose with slacks 
or skirts. Open-toe shoes are not permitted. 

• Long hair must be pulled hack away from the 
face. 
The primary responsibility for complying with 

and enforcing these regulations rests with the indi- 
vidual. Individuals in violation of these regulations 
will be dismissed from the laboratory, clinical area 
and/or lecture room by the supervising faculty until 
these regulations have been met. Department chair- 
persons will ensure that these guidelines are com- 
plied with and enforced. 

A written incident report describing the nature 
of the violation will be forwarded to, and filed in 
the office of the senior associate dean, with a copy 
to the individual within one working day following 
the infraction. Subsequent violations of these regu- 
lations by a given individual will be forwarded by 
the senior associate dean to the appropriate body for 
action. 



• ENTAI SCHOOI 



PUBLICATIONS/ORGANIZATIONS/ 
AWARDS 

Publications 

Dental School and campus publications include the 
Forum, a triannual magazine focusing on news and 
information of and to the school's alumni, faculty, 
students and friends; The UMAB Voice, published 
bi-monthly; and the annual UMAB Student Answer 
Book. In addition, the office of admissions and stu- 
dent affairs publishes a Dental Student Haridbook for 
distribution to incoming dental students. These 
publications are distributed free of charge. 

Student publications include a yearbook, The 
MIRROR, published annually by student editors 
and staff; and a student newspaper, The Maryland 




Probe, published quarterly. Each year the Student 
Dental Association compiles and distributes a stu- 
dent directory. 



Organizations 

The Student Dental Association (SDA) is the or- 
ganizational structure of the student body. The as- 
sociation is presided over and governed by elected 
representatives from all classes and is represented 
on selected committees of the Faculty Council. The 
organization participates in certain student-faculty 
activities and sponsors and directs all student social 
activities. It is responsible for the publication of the 
school's yearbook, The MIRROR, and student 
newspaper, The Maryland Probe, and is unique 
among dental student organizations in having for- 
mulated its own constitution and professional code 
of ethics. 



The American Student Dental Association 

(ASDA) was established in February 1971, with 
the aid of the American Dental Association 
(ADA). Its primary purposes are to secure scholar- 
ships and loans and to assist in other student-related 
affairs. ASDA membership includes student mem- 
bership in the ADA and a subscription to the Jour- 
nal of the ADA and the ADA News. 

Student American Dental Hygienists' Associa- 
tion (SADHA) members are involved in activities 
such as hosting guest speakers, conducting fundrais- 
ing projects, presenting table clinics and maintain- 
ing liaison with the state and local organizations. 
They also participate in meetings and discussion 
groups on a regional and national level. Student 
representatives attend the annual meeting of the 
American Dental Hygienists' Association. 

The Student National Dental Association 
(SNDA), Maryland chapter, was founded in 1973. 
The primary objective of this organization is to fos- 
ter the recruitment, admission, development and 
graduation of black dental and dental hygiene stu- 
dents. Among the activities in which the Maryland 
chapter is engaged are minority recruitment, tutor- 
ing, social and professional programs, and commu- 
nity and university relations. 

The American Association of Dental Re- 
search/Student Research Group was founded in 
1987. The objectives of the local chapter are to pro- 
mote student research in dentistry and its related 
disciplines, to promote the advancement of dental 
research and related aspects, and to further the aims 
and objectives of the American Association of 
Dental Research (AADR) and International Asso- 
ciation of Dental Research (IADR) as they relate to 
student research. Membership is open to all dental 
and dental hygiene students expressing an interest 
in dental research. Past research experience is not a 
requirement for membership. 

The American Association of Dental Schools 
(AADS) promotes the advancement of dental edu- 
cation, research and service in all appropriately ac- 
credited institutions that offer programs for dental 
personnel. The association has three membership 
categories: institutional, individual and student. 
Student members receive the Journal of Dental Edu- 
cation and the Dental Student News, published by 
the association. During the year the local chapter 
conducts programs to promote the goals of this or- 
ganization. Three Dental School student represen- 
tatives (two dental and one dental hygiene) are 



STUDENT LIFE. 53 



elected to serve on the Council of Students of the 
American Association of Dental Schools. 

The Gamma Pi Delta Prosthodontic Honorary 
Society, chartered in 1965, is an honorary student 
dental organization with scholarship and interest in 
the field of prosthetic dentistry as a basis for admis- 
sion. The objective of the organization is the ad- 
vancement of prosthetic dentistry through lectures, 
table clinics and other academic activities which 
will stimulate the creative interest of students and 
the profession in general. 

The Gorgas Odontological Honorary Society 
was organized in 1916 as an honorary student den- 
tal society with scholarship as a basis for admission. 
The society was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. 
Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a teacher of 
many years' experience and a major contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuat- 
ing his name that the society chose its title. 

To be eligible for membership a student must 
rank in the top one-third of the class, must have 
achieved and maintained a minimum grade point 
average of 3.00 in all combined courses and must 
not have repeated for scholastic reasons any subject. 
Speakers prominent in the dental and medical 
fields are invited to address members at monthly 
meetings. An effort is made to obtain speakers not 
affiliated with the university. 

The Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, a 
national honorary dental society, was chartered at 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery during the 
1928-29 academic year. Students whose rank for 
the entire course of study is among the highest 20 
percent of the class are eligible. This high honor is 
conferred upon those seniors who, in addition to 
scholarship, have demonstrated exemplary charac- 
ter traits and potential for future professional 
growth and attainment. 

The Academy of General Dentistry member- 
ship is open to all students in the Dental School. 
C reneral dentists share extraordinary experiences in 
lecture-discussion programs of interest to all. Meet- 
ings are held several times a year after school hours. 

The American Association of Women Dentists 
was founded nationally in 1921. The Maryland stu- 
dent chapter, founded in 1982, provides support 
and information locally to women dental students 
attending the Dental School. Lectures, group dis- 
cussions, projects and gatherings with practitioners 
and AAWD chapters from other dental schools 
form the basis ol the group's ac tivities. 




The American Society of Dentistry for Chil- 
dren meets once a month and uses a lecture-discus- 
sion format to discuss subjects as varied as nutrition 
for children to nitrous oxide analgesia in private 
practice. All students are welcome to join. 

The Big Brother/Sister Program is a voluntary 
effort on the part of each member of the year II den- 
tal student class to help and advise a member of the 
incoming year I class. It is hoped that this assistance 
will continue through graduation of each class. The 
program has been made an official standing com- 
mittee of the SDA. 

The Dental Hygiene Big Brother/Sister Pro- 
gram is a voluntary effort on the part of each mem- 
ber of the senior class to help and advise a member 
of the junior class. It is hoped that this assistance 
will continue through graduation of each class. 

The Christian Dental Association, a chapter of 
the Christian Medical Society, provides students 
with opportunities in the areas of community and 
world outreach programs. In addition to holding 
Bible study sessions and lectures, the group is form- 
ing a network between practicing Christian dentists 
and dental students. 

Professional dental fraternities are Greek letter 
organizations of men and women bonded together 
by ritual. They are specialized fraternities which 
limit membership to selected graduates and students 
enrolled and satisfactorily pursuing courses in an ac- 
credited college of dentistry. They are not honorary 
fraternities or recognition societies which confer 
membership to recognize outstanding scholarship. 
Their aims are to promote the high ideals and stan- 
dards of the profession, advance professional knowl- 
edge and welfare of members, and provide a 
medium through which members, with a common 
interest, can develop everlasting friendships. Repre 



54 • D E N T A I S ( HOOI 



sentative chapters in the Dental School are Alpha 
Omega, founded in 1907, and Psi Omega, founded 
in 1892. 

Awards 

Awards are presented to senior students at gradua- 
tion to recognize the following achievements and 
qualities: 
Dentistry 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the 10 highest in the 
class 

• highest average in basic biological sciences 

• highest average in preclinical studies 

• ethical standards, kindness and humanitarianism 

• professional demeanor 

• devotion to the school and the profession 

• characteristics of an outstanding general practi- 
tioner 

• greatest degree of professional growth and devel- 
opment 

• conscientious and enthusiastic devotion to clini- 
cal practice 

• high proficiency in clinical care and patient 
management 

• greatest proficiency in oral and maxillofacial 
surgery 

• excellence in fixed partial prosthodontics 

• excellence in complete operative restoration 

• excellence in removable prosthodontics 

• outstanding senior thesis/table clinic 

• research achievement 

• achievement, proficiency and/or potential in 
each of the following disciplines or specialty 
areas: 

anatomy 

anesthesiology 

basic dental science 

dental materials 

dentistry for children 

dentistry for the handicapped 

dental radiology 

endodontics 

geriatric dentistry 

gold foil operation 

operative dentistry 

oral health care delivery 

oral medicine 

oral pathology 

oral and maxillofacial surgery 

orthodontics 



periodontology 
removable prosthodontics 
Dental Hygiene 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the five highest in 
the class 

• humanitarianism, ethical standards and devo- 
tion to the profession 

• interest in and potential for active participation 
in professional organizations 

• interest and participation in the Student Ameri- 
can Dental Hygienists' Association 

• outstanding clinical performance 

• outstanding leadership and participation in com- 
munity activities and student and professional 
organizations 



STUDENT L I F E • 55 



Matriculation Policies and Procedures 




REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

To attend classes students are required to register 
each term in accordance with current registration 
procedures. Fees are due and payable on the dates 
specified for registration. Registration is not com- 
pleted until all financial obligations are satisfied. 
Students who do not complete their registration 
and pay tuition and all fees will not be permitted 
to attend classes. A fee will be charged for late 
registration. 

Although the university regularly mails bills to 
advance-registered students, it cannot assume re- 
sponsibility for their receipt. If any student does not 
receive a bill prior to the beginning of a semester in 
which he/she has advance registered, it is the stu- 
dent's responsibility to contact the registrar's office 
or cashier's office during normal business hours. 

All checks and money orders should be made 
payable to the University of Maryland for the exact 
amount of the actual bill. 

No diploma, certificate or transcript ot record 
will be issued to a student who has not made satis- 
factory settlement ot his university account. 

DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE STATUS 

An initial determination of in-state status for ad- 
mission, tuition and charge-differential purposes 
will be made by the university at the time a stu- 
dent's application for admission is under considera- 
tion. The determination made at that time, and any 
determination made thereafter, shall prevail in each 
semester until the determination is successfully 
challenged. 

Students classified as in-state for admission, tu- 
ition and charge-differential purposes are responsi- 
ble for notifying the office of records and registra- 
tion, in writing, within 15 days ot any change in 
their circumstances which might in any way affect 
their classification at UMAB. 

The determination of in-state status for admis- 
sion, tuition and charge-differential puq->oses is the 
responsibility of the campus office ot records and 
registration. A student may request a reevaluation 
i)( this status by filing a petition (available in room 
^2d ot the Baltimore Student Union). ( )opies ot the 
university's policy are available in the admissions 
office and in the dean's office. 



1994-95 TUITION AND FEES 



Dental Program 



Per 
Semester 



Per 
Year 



Matriculation (new students 1* 


$ 40 


$40 


Tuition (fixed charges) 






In-state 


4,350 


8,700 


Out-of-state 


9,579 


19,157 


Student Government 






Association 


8 


15 


Transportation fee 


10 


20 


Student activities fee 


22 


44 


Supporting facilities fee 


100 


199 


Instrument cassette 






service charge 


875 


1,750 


Breakage fee* (refundable) 


200 


200 


Dental equipment 






purchase fee 






Year I 


2,270 


2,270 


Year 11 


1,460 


1,460 


Year III 


100 


100 


Laundry service charge 






Years I and II 


85 


170 


Years III and IV 


123 


245 


Student liability insurance 






Years I, 11 


75 


75 


Years III, IV 


150 


150 


Hepatitis vaccine series* 


140 


140 


Hospitalization insurance** 






One person 


462 


911 


Two persons 


977 


1,953 


Family 


1,219 


2,437 


Disability insurance 


28 


28 


Dormitory fee*** 






Graduation fee (seniors)* 


35 


35 


*One-timefee. 






**The university's program or equiv, 


alent insurance coverage 


is required oj all dental students m addition to 


the student 


health fee. 






***Dormitory fees are $46 75 pet u 


eek, double i 


tccupancy, 


pei occupant. 







An enrollment deposit ot $200 is required ot all 
dental students upon acceptance o\ the offer ot ad- 
mission to the Dental School. It will be credited to- 
ward the applicant's tuition and is nonrefundable. 
An addition. il $100 deposit is due by June 1 to con- 
firm intent to enroll. 



r A 1 S C H O 1 



Dental Hygiene Program 





Per 


Per 




Semester 


Year 


Matriculation (new students)* $ 40 


$40 


Tuition (fixed charges)** 






In-state 


1,240 


2,479 


Out-of-state 


4,016 


8,031 


Student Government 






Association fee 


8 


15 


Transportation fee 


10 


20 


Student activities fee 


22 


44 


Supporting facilities fee 


100 


199 


Instrument cassette 






service charge 


400 


800 


Breakage fee, Year III 






(refundable)* 


100 


100 


Dental equipment 






purchase fee, Year III* 


315 


315 


Laundry service charge 


73 


145 


Student liability insurance 


50 


50 


Hepatitis vaccine series* 


140 


140 


Hospitalization insurance** 


* 




One person 


462 


923 


Two persons 


977 


1,953 


Family 


1,219 


2,437 


Disability insurance 


28 


28 


Domiitory fee**** 






Graduation fee (seniors)* 


35 


35 


* One-time fee . 






**Tuition figures are based on full-time attendance. Tu- 


ition for part-time students (8 credits or less) i 


$ J 53 per 


credit hour in-state, $230 


per credit hour out-of-state 


students. 






***The university's program at 


equivalent insurance cover- 


age is required of all full-time dental hygiene students in 


addition to the student health fee. 




****Dormitory fees are $46.75 


■>er week, double occupancy, 


per occupant. 







Advanced Specialty Education 



Students who are offered admission will be re- 
quired to send a deposit of $200 with a letter of in- 
tent to enroll. This deposit will be credited toward 
tuition at registration, but will not be refunded in 
the event of failure to enroll. 



Per Per 

Semester Year 



$ 40 



$40 



3,915 


7,830 


7,864 


15,729 


15 


15 


10 


20 


22 


44 


99 


199 



750 



,500 



Application fee* 
Tuition 

In-state 

Out-of-state 
Student Government 

Association fee* 
Transportation fee 
Student activities fee 
Supporting facilities fee 
Instrument/Cassette 

Service Charge 
Breakage allowance 

(first year only)** 
Laundry Service Charge 
Student liability insurance 
Hepatitis B vaccine* 
Hospitalization insurance** 

One person 

Two persons 

Family 

*One-timefee. 
**Refundable upon completion of program. 
***The university's program or equivalent insurance coverage 

is required of all postgraduate students in addition to the 

student health fee . 

Postgraduate students in the endodontics, pedi- 
atric dentistry, periodontics, prosthodontics and or- 
thodontics programs are assessed an enrollment de- 
posit of $200. The deposit is credited to the 
student's account upon registration. The enroll- 
ment deposit is not refundable. 

Students enrolled in graduate courses only 
should consult the University of Maryland Gradu- 
ate School, Baltimore catalog for information about 
tuition and fees. 



200 


200 


122 


245 


250 


250 


140 


140 


461 


923 


976 


1,953 


1,218 


2,437 




MATRICULATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES. 57 



Explanation of Fees 

The application and/or matriculation fee partially 
defrays the cost of processing applications for admis- 
sion and enrollment data in the professional 
schools. These are not refundable. The application 
fee will be applied against the matriculation fee for 
accepted students. 

The Student Government Association fee is 
used to fund the activities sponsored by the Univer- 
sity Student Government Association. 

The transportation fee is used to support the 
cost of the shuttle system (the Caravan) which 
transports students to local neighborhoods. 

The student activities fee is used to meet the 
costs for various student activities, student publica- 
tions and cultural programs within the Dental 
School. The Student Dental Association, in coop- 
eration with the dean's office, recommends expen- 
ditures of the fees collected. 

The supporting facilities fee is used for expan- 
sion of various campus facilities that are not funded 
or are funded only in part from other sources. 

The instrument/cassette service charge covers 
the rental of handpieces, instrument cassettes and 
enhancement instruments. 

The dental equipment purchase fee covers the 
preclinical laboratory charges for expendable sup- 
plies, materials and equipment. 

The laundry service charge covers the rental 
and laundering fee for laboratory coats. 

Student liability (malpractice) insurance is 
charged all professional school students. Dental and 
dental hygiene students in each year of the program 
are required to purchase professional liability insur- 
ance as a condition for enrollment. This policy also 
applies to all advanced dental education students. 
Predoctoral dental and dental hygiene students ob- 
tain insurance coverage through a group program 
for a reasonable premium estimated at $75-$ 150 per 
year. Information regarding professional coverage 
for students is available through the Dental 
School's office of clinical affairs. 

Hospitalization insurance is required o{ all full- 
time students. A brief outline of the student hospi- 
talization insurance program is furnished each stu- 
dent. Students with equivalent insurance coverage 
must provide proof of such coverage at the time of 
registration and obtain a hospitalization insurance 
waiver each fall semester. 

Disability insurance is required of all dental and 
dental hygiene students. 



The graduation fee is charged to help defray 
costs involved with graduation and commence- 
ment. 

Fees for auditors are the same as those charged 
for courses taken for credit at both the predoctoral 
and graduate level. Audited credit hours will be 
added to a student's total credit enrollment to de- 
termine whether or not a student is full-time or 
part-time for tuition and fee assessment purposes. 




Special students are assessed tuition and fees in 
accordance with the schedule for the comparable 
predoctoral, graduate or first professional classifica- 
tion. 

• A service charge is assessed for dishonored 
checks and is payable for each check which is re- 
turned unpaid by the drawee bank on initial pre- 
sentation because of insufficient funds, payment 
stopped, postdating or drawn against uncollected 
items. 

For checks up to $50 $ 5 

For checks from $50.01 to $100 $10 

For checks over $100 $20 

• A late registration fee is charged to defray the 
cost of the special handling involved for those 
who do not complete their registration on the 
prescribed days. 

• The university reserves the right to make such 
changes in fees and other charges as may be nec- 
essary. 



58 • D E N 'I A I S C H O O 1 



Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 

Students who want to leave the school at any time 
during the academic year are required to file a letter 
of resignation with the dean. In addition, an appli- 
cation for withdrawal form bearing the proper sig- 
natures must he filed with the registrar's office. The 
student must have no outstanding obligations to the 
school and must return the student identification 
card. 

If the above procedures are not completed, the 
student will not be entitled to honorable dismissal 
and will forfeit the right to any refunds which would 
otherwise be given. The date used in computing re- 
funds is the date on which the application for with- 
drawal is filed in the registrar's office. 

Students officially withdrawing from the school 
will be credited for all academic fees charged to 
them less the matriculation fee, in accordance with 
the following schedule for the date instruction 
begins: 

Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 
Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 



OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY RECORDS 

Transcript of Record 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of their 
UMAB record from the registrar's office. There is 
no charge for this service. A request for transcripts 
must be made in writing and should be made at 
least five days in advance of the date when the 
records are actually needed. Transcripts are issued 
in turn as requests are received. No transcript will 
be furnished to any student or alumnus whose fi- 
nancial obligations to the university have not been 
satisfied. 



Diploma Application 

Degree requirements vary according to the UMAB 
school or program in which a student is registered. 
However, each degree candidate must file a formal 
application for diploma with the registrar's office at 
the beginning of the term in which the student ex- 
pects to graduate. This must be done by the end of 
the third week of the semester or the second week 
of the summer session. 

A student who does not graduate on the origi- 
nally expected date must reapply for graduation by 
the appropriate deadline. 




STUDENT EXPENSES 



STUDENT HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 



A reasonable estimation of expenses for the 1994— 
95 academic year for in-state students living away 
from home is $17,000; for out-of-state students, 
$31,000. These figures include tuition, fees, food, 
lodging and personal expenses, excluding travel and 
the costs of instruments, supplies and books. 

Textbooks 

A list of textbooks recommended for first-year 
courses is mailed to incoming students during the 
summer prior to enrollment. Textbook lists for sec- 
ond-, third- and fourth-year courses are circulated at 
the beginning of the academic year. The campus 
bookstore stocks these books; students may pur- 
chase books there or at other local bookstores. Ap- 
proximate costs of textbooks and other instruc- 
tional materials are as follows: 

First year $525 

Second year 500 

Third year 250 

Fourth year 50 



All students are required to have the campus-spon- 
sored student health and hospitalization insurance 
or its equivalent. Detailed information regarding 
the provisions of the excellent student policy the 
campus offers may be obtained from Student and 
Employee Health. At the time of registration each 
year, students must either purchase the student cov- 
erage or produce certified proof of equivalent cover- 
age. If proof of comparable insurance is not received 
at Student and Employee Health by September 15, 
the student will be required to pay for the student 
policy for that semester. 

Students are required to document their immu- 
nity to childhood diseases, including measles, 
mumps, rubella and chicken pox. Information re- 
garding specific requirements will be distributed to 
each student. Since hepatitis "B" is an occupational 
risk for health care providers, all enrolling dental 
students are also required to undergo immunization 
against hepatitis "B." Vaccine cost is included in 
the student fees. 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES • 59 



Financial Aid 




Aid programs are centrally administered by Student 
Financial Aid, located in the Baltimore Student 
Union. The purpose of the program is to help stu- 
dents who otherwise would be financially unable to 
attend the university. To qualify for aid, the student 
must apply annually and meet certain eligibility re- 
quirements. Students should apply in January for 
the following academic year. 

Aid packages often include a combination of 
loans, grants, scholarships and work-study designed 
to meet 100 percent of a student's needs. The stu- 
dent should call Student Financial Aid (410-706- 
7347) or stop by for fact sheets that contain detailed 
information on the application process and types of 
aid available. The office is open from 8:00 a.m. until 
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

UNIVERSITY GRANTS 

In an attempt to meet the ever- increasing needs of 
students, the Maryland legislature each year allo- 
cates to the university funds earmarked for student 
assistance. As a result, university grants are avail- 
able to Maryland residents who demonstrate a fi- 
nancial need. After careful review of the student's 
current financial situation, awards are made on an 
individual basis in the form of Dean's Scholarships, 
Desegregation Grants, Other Race Grants, and Tu- 
ition Waivers. 



ENDOWMENT AND LOAN FUNDS 

American Dental Hygienists' Association Schol- 
arship and Loan Program. The American Dental 
Hygienists' Association administers two scholarship 
programs: the Certificate Scholarship Program for 
students entering the final year of a dental hygiene 
curriculum and the Post Dental Hygiene Scholar- 
ship Program for certificate dental hygienists who 
will be enrolled in a program leading to a baccalau- 
reate degree. Dental hygiene students who will be 
enrolled or accepted for full-time enrollment may 
also be considered for American Dental Hygienists' 
Association Loans which range from $500 to 
$1,000 annually. Repayment begins 10 months 
after graduation with 7.5 percent interest on the 
amount of the loan outstanding. For further infor- 
mation about these scholarships, write directly to 
the American Dental Hygienists' Association, 211 



East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. In 
addition, local chapters of the ADHA may offer 
scholarships and/or loans. For information, contact 
the SADHA advisor on the dental hygiene faculty. 

John Carr Emergency Loan Fund. This en- 
dowed emergency student loan fund was established 
in memory of Dr. John Carr, a dedicated member of 
the Dental School faculty, and is available to dental 
and dental hygiene students who have an emer- 
gency need during their school years. Repayment of 
the loan is not scheduled until after graduation. 

The Dr. Gene W. Eng Scholarship Fund. This 
scholarship, which was established to honor Dr. 
Gene W. Eng, class of 1963, provides funds to de- 
serving first year dental students for payment of tu- 
ition and fees. The criteria for selection shall not be 
dependent on high academic achievement, but 
shall be based on financial need and evidence of po- 
tential for success in the Dental School and in the 
profession of dentistry. 

All final candidates will be required to submit an 
essay describing their personal and professional rea- 
sons for applying for this scholarship. Students se- 
lected as entering freshmen shall be eligible for the 
scholarship each year while enrolled and in good 
academic standing in the Dental School. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endow- 
ment Loan Fund. Under a provision of the will of 
the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord of New Haven, 
Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 
was bequeathed to the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore to aid worthy students in securing a den- 
tal education. 

The Russell Gigliotti Memorial Student Loan 
Fund. This fund is intended to provide financial as- 
sistance primarily but not exclusively to students in 
the preclinical years, for which costs are signifi- 
cantly higher because of required instrument and 
material purchases. Any predoctoral dental student 
who qualifies for financial aid, and who is unable to 
secure other university financial assistance, is eligi- 
ble to apply. 

A maximum of $500 annually will be loaned to 
one student; no student may receive more than two 
loans during the period oi training. Simple interest 
at the rate of 5 percent per annum will be charged, 
commencing three months after graduation. Princi- 
pal plus interest must be repaid within 27 months 
following graduation. The fund was established in 



6 • DENT Al S< lloo I 






1977 in memory of Dr. Russell Gigliotti, an alum- 
nus and dedicated member of the faculty for more 
than 30 years. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund. This fund was 
established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni As- 
sociation in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a 
member of the class of 1910. The fund is a source of 
valuable help in aiding students to solve temporary 
financial problems. 

Lawrence A. Haskins Memorial Student Loan 
Fund. This fund, honoring the memory of Dr. 
Haskins, class of 1970, provides loans to deserving 
students in the Dental School. Loans made from 
the fund shall bear 7 percent interest per annum to 
accrue with the start of the repayment period which 
shall last no longer than 10 years. The repayment 
period shall begin one year after the completion of 
studies. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation. During World 
War II the foundation granted to this school a 
fund to provide rotating loans to deserving dental 
students. 

The Wilson B. Lau Memorial Student Loan 
Fund. Established by his wife to honor the memory 
of Wilson B. Lau, this revolving student loan fund 
provides loans to deserving students in the Dental 
School. Loans made from the fund shall bear 7 per- 
cent interest per annum to accrue with the start of 
the repayment period which shall last no longer 
than 10 years. The repayment period shall begin 
one year after the completion of studies. 

The Sol B. Love Memorial Student Loan Fund. 
This revolving student loan fund was established by 
his family to honor the memory of Dr. Sol B. Love, 
a member of the class of 1961. Loans made from the 
fund to deserving students in the Dental School 
shall bear 7 percent interest per annum to accrue 
with the start of the repayment period which shall 
last no longer than 10 years. The repayment period 
shall begin one year after the completion of studies. 

Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association. The 
Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association adminis- 
ters a loan program for qualified senior dental hy- 
giene students. Information is distributed to junior 
students by the Department of Dental Hygiene dur- 
ing the spring semester. 

The Dr. Joseph Anthony Pennino Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Under the provision of the will 
of the late Elizabeth Pennino, this endowed schol- 
arship fund was established as a memorial to Dr. 
Joseph Anthony Pennino, class of 1928, to provide 



scholarships to deserving students in the D.D.S. 
program of the Dental School. 

The Ronald M. Starr Family Student Loan 
Fund. This endowed student loan fund was estab- 
lished to honor the family of Dr. Ronald M. Starr, 
class of 1958, by providing loans to pay tuition and 
fees to deserving junior and senior dental and den- 
tal hygiene students. The students must have 
demonstrated financial need and the potential for 
success in the Dental School and the profession of 
dentistry. Repayment of the loan begins three years 
after completion of studies in the Dental School. 
Loans made from the fund shall bear no interest 
until graduation or until the student ceases to be 
enrolled. 

The Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship. The De- 
partment of Dental Hygiene awards the Patricia C. 
Stearns Scholarship to a student entering the senior 
year who has demonstrated academic excellence; 
willingness to serve the class, school and commu- 
nity; dedication to the profession; and high stan- 
dards of professional conduct. 

The Student Dental Association-Alumni 
Fund. This fund, created in 1960, was established 
for the purpose of aiding any student who may be in 
need of an emergency loan. 

The following government, bank and private 
lender loans also are available to students on the 
basis of need: Health Professions Student Loan, 
Perkins Loan, Guaranteed Student Loan, Health 
Education Assistance Loan and Supplemental 
Loans. All requirements, interest rates and terms for 
these loans can be found in the Office of Student 
Financial Aid brochure. 



FINANCIAL A I D • 61 



Administration and Faculty 




4 



1 t 



DENTAL SCHOOL 

Administrative Officers 

Dean 

Richard R. Ranney, D.D.S., University of Iowa, 

1963; M.S., University of Rochester, 1969. 

Senior Associate Dean 

Warren M. Morganstein, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1966; D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1975. 

Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs 

John F. Hasler, B.S., Indiana University, 1958; 

D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

Assistant Dean for Research and Graduate Affairs 
John J. Sauk, B.S., University of Detroit, 1963; 
D.D.S., 1967; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1971. 

Assistant Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs 
Margaret B. Wilson, B.S., David Lipscomb College, 
1977; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1981; 
M.B.A., University of Maryland, 1990. 

Assistant Dean for Fiscal and Personnel Affairs 
James Reynolds, B.A., Michigan State University, 
1974; M.B.A., University of Rochester, 1980. 

Director of Continuing Education 

Allan H. Dana, B.A., University of Miami, 1959; 

M.B.A., 1961. 

Faculty Emeriti 

JohnJ.Salley,DD.S.,Ph.D. 

Dean Emeritus 

Irving I. Abramson, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Frank A. Dolle, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M., D.Sc. 

Professor Emeritus 

Frank C. Jerbi, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

John P. Lambooy, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 



RobertJ.Leupold.D.M.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Martin Lunin, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Charles T. Pridgeon, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

D. Vincent Provenza, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Wilbur O.Ramsey, D.D.S. 

Professor Ementus 

Frieda G. Rudo, Ph.D. 

Professor Emerita 

John I. White, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

Riley S. Williamson Jr., D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Marvin M. Graham, D.D.S. 

Clinical Professor Emeritus 

Faculty 

Abrams, Ronald G., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, 
B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1958; D.M.D., 
Tufts University, 1962; M.S., 1966. 

Ackerman, Ronald I., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S., Howard University, 
1976. 

Ailor, John E., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University 
of Tennessee, 1964. 

Anderson, Carol F., Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, A.A., Prince George's Community 
College, 1980; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1988. 

Apicella, Albert, Clinical Assistant Professor, Or- 
thodontics, B.A., Washington and Jefferson 
College, 1984; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1988. 

Arceo, Nilda, Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S.A., Jose Marti Preuniversity Insti- 
tute of Havana, 1977; D.D.S., University oi 
Maryland, 1986. 

Arita, Charles, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.A., D.D.S., University of California at San 
Francisco, 1988. 



62 • D E N T A L SCHOO] 



Baer, Marvin L., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of 
Texas, 1960; M.S., Ohio State University, 1967. 

Balciunas, Birute A., Assistant Professor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Notre 
Dame College, 1970; D.D.S., Case Western Re- 
serve University, 1975; M.S.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1979. 

Balis, Sophia, Clinical Associate Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Athens 
(Greece), 1957; D.D.S., University of Toronto 
(Canada), 1966. 

Barclay, David M., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., 
Haverford College, 1980; M.D., Tulane Medical 
School, 1988; M.P.H., Tulane School of Public 
Health and Tropical Medicine, 1988. 

Barnes, Christine, Clinical Instructor, Periodon- 
tics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Barnes, Douglas M., Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1979; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1983. 

Bashirelahi, Nasir, Professor, Oral and Craniofa- 
cial Biological Sciences, B.S., Tehran University 
(Iran), 1960; Pharm. D., 1962; M.S., University 
of Louisville, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Bauman, Gary H., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Brooklyn 
College, 1981; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1985. 

Beach, Daryl R., Clinical Associate Professor Vol- 
unteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Oregon 
State University, 1947; D.M.D., University of 
Oregon, 1951. 

Belenky, Michael M., Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Virginia Military 
Institute, 1955; D.D.S., University of Michigan, 
1961; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1975. 

Benevento, Louis, Professor, Oral and Craniofacial 
Biological Sciences, B.S., Rensselaer Polytech- 
nic Institute, 1962; M.S., 1964; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1967. 

Bennett, Robert B., Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., Carleton 
College, 1960; M.S., University of Nebraska, 
1963; Ph.D., 1967. 

Bergman, Stewart A., Professor, Oral and Maxillo- 
facial Surgery, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1964; 



D.D.S., State University of New York, 1968; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1986. 

Bergquist, John J., Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Iowa, 1954; M.S., 1970. 

Berning, Randall K., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., 
University of Illinois, 1973; J.D., Golden Gate 
University, 1977; L.L.M., Loyola University of 
Chicago, 1989. 

Birkedal-Hansen, Henning, Adjunct Professor 
Volunteer, Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sci- 
ences, D.D.S., Royal Dental College of Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, 1969; Lie. Odont., 1972; Dr. 
Odont., 1977. 

Blaik, Thomas K., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, A.A., 
Prince Georges Community College, 1980; 
D.D.S., Howard University, 1980. 

Blank, Lawrence W., Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S.D., University of Cal- 
ifornia, 1968; D.D.S., 1968; M.S., George Wash- 
ington University, 1974; M.S., University of 
Michigan, 1978. 

Blum, Damian D., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1979; D.M.D., Boston University, 1983. 

Boughman, JoAnn, Research Professor Volunteer, 
Periodontics, B.S., Indiana University, 1972; 
Ph.D., 1978. 

Bowen, William J., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Periodontics, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1959; D.D.S., 1962. 

Bowers, Gerald M., Professor, Periodontics, B.S., 
University of Michigan, 1950; D.D.S., 1954; 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1962. 

Bowers, Jane E., Research Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Periodontics, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1977; M.S., Towson State University, 
1987. 

Bowman, John M., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1972; D.M.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1976. 

Bradbury, John R., Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Ohio State 
University, 1969; D.D.S., 1972. 

Branch-Mays, Grishondra, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Periodontics, B.S., University of Houston, 
1986; D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1991; 
M.S., University of Iowa, 1994. 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY* 63 



Branoff, Ronald S., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Orthodontics, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966; M.S.D., Fairleigh Dickinson 
University, 1970. 

Brooks, John, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1974; D.D.S., 1979. 

Brown, D. Michael, Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, 
B.A., St. Johns College, 1951; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1961. 

Bruno, John, Clinical Assistant Professor Volun- 
teer, Periodontics, B.S., Georgetown University, 
1958; D.D.S., 1964; M.S., 1966. 

Bullock, Nathaniel Jr., Clinical Instructor Volun- 
teer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Frosthurg 
State University, 1984; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1989. 

Buxbaum, Jerome D., Clinical Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1951; D.D.S., 1955. 

Callery, Patrick, Associate Professor Volunteer, 
Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., 
University of Utah, 1968; Ph.D., University of 
California, 1974. 

Caplan, Carl, Clinical Associate Professor Volun- 
teer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1959; D.D.S., 1963; M.B.A., Loy- 
ola College, 1981. 

Cappuccio, Joseph P., Professor Emeritus, Special 
Assistant to the Dean for Alumni Affairs, B.S., 
University of Rhode Island, 1943; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1946. 

Capra, Norman, Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Birming- 
ham Southern College, 1969; M.S., University 
of Alabama, 1975; Ph.D., 1976. 

Carr, Sandra J., Dental School Assistant Professor, 
Dental Hygiene, A. A., Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity, 1964; B.A., Eastern Illinois University, 
1974; M.Ed., Washington University, 1977. 

Chang, Yung-Feng, Professor, Biochemistry, B.S., 
National Taiwan University, 1958; M.S., 1960; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

Chaudhari, Anshumali, Adjunct Associate Profes- 
sor Volunteer, Oral and Craniofacial Biological 
Sciences; B.S., University of Lucknow, India, 
1966; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 1976. 

Christopher, Andrew, Clinical Associate Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Manhattan College, 1943; D.D.S., Marquette 



University, 1947; M.H.A., Baylor University, 
1967. 

Chu, Khanh P., Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University 
of Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Cofie, Zenaida M., Clinical Instructor, Orthodon- 
tics, B.A., New York University, 1987; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1993. 

Cohen, Leonard A., Professor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.A., George Washington University, 
1967; D.D.S., Howard University, 1971; M.P.H., 
Harvard School of Public Health, 1974; M.S., 
1976. 

Colangelo, Gary A., Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1965; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1970. 

Coll, James A., Clinical Associate Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1969; D.M.D., 1969; M.S., University of Ore- 
gon, 1974. 




Collins, Robert J. Jr., Clinical Associate Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, A.B., 
Saint Anselm's College, 1967; D.M.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1971; M.P.H., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1980. 

Conway, Michael, Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of 
Indiana, 1960; M.S., University of Missouri, 
1968. 

Cootauco, Cynthia J., Dental School Assistant 
Professor, Endodontics, B.S., Loyola College of 
Maryland, 1984; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1989; D.D.S., 1993. 



(.-1 • M N I A I S< HOOl 



Costello, Leslie C, Professor, Oral and Craniofa- 
cial Biological Sciences, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

Couwenhoven, Ross, Assistant Professor, Oral 
Pathology, B.A., Calvin College, 1976; D.D.S., 
University of Illinois, 1981; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1988. 

Crafton, B. Casey, Clinical Assistant Professor, Pe- 
diatric Dentistry, B.A., West Virginia Univer- 
sity, 1983; D.D.S., 1987. 

Craig, James F., Professor, Oral Health Care Deliv- 
ery, B.S., Western Illinois University, 1968; 
M.S., Indiana University, 1970, Ed.D., 1972. 

Creamer, Timothy J., Dental School Assistant 
Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., State 
University of New York at Albany, 1972; 
D.D.S., University of Texas, 1978. 

Crooks, Edwin L., Assistant Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences/General Practice 
Residency, B.S., Randolph Macon College, 
1967; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1973. 

Crossley, Harold L., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Rhode Island, 1964; M.S., 1970; Ph.D., 
1972; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 

Cunningham, Edward P. Jr., Clinical Instructor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, A.B., 
Eastern Nazarene College, 1961; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1966. 

Curley, Diane, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., West Chester University, 1976; M.S., 
Temple University, 1982. 

Dailey, Jacqueline, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, A. A., Community 
College of Baltimore, 1981; A.A., 1988. 

Dana, Allan H., Clinical Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of 
Miami, 1959; M.B.A., 1961. 

Davidson, William M., Professor, Orthodontics, 
A.B., Dartmouth College, 1960; D.M.D., Har- 
vard University, 1965; Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota, 1969. 

Davis, Vincent H., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Lock Haven Uni- 
versity, 1981; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1989. 

Davliakos, John P., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1980; D.M.D., University of Pennsylva- 
nia, 1984- 



Delisle, Allan L., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Univer- 
sity of California, 1960; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, 1968. 

DePaola, Louis G., Associate Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., University 
of Maryland, 1971; D.D.S., 1975. 

Dermody, John C, Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
tics, B.D.S., University College, Cork, 1987; 
F.F.D., Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, 1991. 

Dessem, Dean, Associate Professor, Oral and Cran- 
iofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Tulane Uni- 
versity, 1976; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1985. 

DeVore, Linda, Associate Professor, Dental Hy- 
giene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; M.A., 
1982. 

DiAndreth, Matthew W., Clinical Instructor, En- 
dodontics, D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 
1989. 

Di Fabio, Vincent E., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Xavier 
University, 1967; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1971; M.S., University of Rochester, 1979. 

Dumsha, Thomas C, Associate Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1972; 
M.S., 1976; D.D.S., 1979. 

Durkee, Mark C, Research Fellow, Orthodontics, 
B.S., Trenton State College, 1980; M.S., Lehigh 
University, 1982; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1991. 

Eastwood, Gerald W., Dental School Associate 
Professor, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Concor- 
dia College, 1955; D.M.D., University of Ore- 
gon, 1959; M.A., George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1981. 

Ebright, Capri K., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., Gettysburg 
College, 1988; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1992. 

Eldridge, Roger L., Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., University 
of Maryland, 1975; D.D.S., 1978. 

Elias, Samia A., Dental School Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.D.S., Alexandria Uni- 
versity (Egypt), 1965; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1985. 

Ellis, Richard, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, 
B.D.S., University of Otago, New Zealand, 1985. 

Enwonwu, Cyril O., Research Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Ibadan, Nigeria, 1956; B.D.S., University 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY* 65 




of Bristol, 1961; M.D.S., 1966; Sc.D., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, 1968; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Bristol, 1976. 

Exler, Alan, Clinical Assistant Professor Volun- 
teer, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1972; D.D.S., 1977. 

Falkler, William A. Jr., Professor, Oral and Cran- 
iofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., Western 
Maryland College, 1966; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1969; Ph.D., 1971. 

Faraone, Karen L., Dental School Associate Pro 
fessor, Restorative Dentistry, R.N., University of 
Maryland, 1974; B.S., 1974; D.D.S., 1978; M.A. 
1983. 

Feldman, Sylvan, Clinical Associate Professor Vol 
unteer, Periodontics/Restorative Dentistry, B.S. 
University of Maryland, 1962; D.D.S., 1965. 

Fellona, Michelle, Clinical Instructor, Dental Hy 
giene, A. A., Fairleigh Dickenson University' 
1963; B.S., University of Maryland, 1990. 

Franklin, Renty B., Professor, Oral and Craniofa 
cial Biological Sciences, B.S., Morehouse Col 
lege, 1966; M.S., Atlanta University, 1967 
Ph.D., Howard University, 1972. 

Freedman, Gerson A., Clinical Associate Profes 
sor, Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 

Freilich, Lawrence S., Clinical Associate Professor 
Periodontics, D.D.S., Temple University, 1962 
Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1972. 

Fried, Ivan S. (Scott), Clinical Assistant Professor 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Ten 
nessee, 1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland 
1977. 

Fried, Jacquelyn L., Associate Professor, Denta 
Hygiene, B.A., Ohio State University, 1968 
M.S., Old Dominion University, 1976. 

Gamson, Edward K., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Endodontics, B.A., University of Maryland 
1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Garber, Karen, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., North- 
eastern University, 1978; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1982. 

Gartner, Leslie P., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., Rutgers 
University, 1965; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 1970. 

Gaston, Gerald W., Clinical Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Miami University, 
1952; D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1959; 
Ph.D., 1972. 



Gaston, Judith, Adjunct Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sci- 
ences, B.S., University of Detroit, 1980; M.S., 
1982. 

George, David L., Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 
1984. 

Gerhardt, Donald E., Associate Professor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 
1955; D.M.D, Tufts University, 1959; M.S., 
University of Texas, 1971. 

Gierlach, John G., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Pediatric Dentistry., B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1969; B.D.S., Sydney University, 
1977. 

Gingell, James C., Dental School Associate Profes- 
sor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972; M.S., 1983. 

Ginsberg, Edward L., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1978; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1982. 

Goldbeck, Raymond E., Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Loyola 
College, 1976; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1986. 

Goodman, Harry, Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., Rut- 
gers University, 1972; D.M.D., College of Medi- 
cine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 1975; M.P.H., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1986. 

Grace, Edward G. Jr., Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Mount St. Mary's 
College, 1960; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1964; M.A. Loyola College, 1981; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1987. 

Grebosky, Mark R., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Saint Vincent Col- 
lege, 1981; D.M.D., University ot Pittsburgh, 
1985. 

Greenbaum, Jack L., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of New 
Hampshire, 1969; D.M.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1973; M.A., San Diego State Univer- 
sity, 1977; M.S., New York University, 1982. 

Griswold, William H., Clinical Associate Profes- 
sor, Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 1963. 

Gunderson, Ronald B., Dental School Associate 
Professor, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Western 



66. DENTAL SCHOi'l 



Maryland College, 1967; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1971. 

Guthmiller, Janet M., Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, A. A., University of South Dakota, 
1983; B.A., Northwestern College; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1988; Ph.D., University of Texas 
Health Science Center, 1994. 

Hack, Gary D., Dental School Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1975; D.D.S., 1979. 

Halpert, Lawrence F., Clinical Professor, Peri- 
odontics, A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1958; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

Hasler, John F., Professor, Oral Medicine and Di- 
agnostic Sciences, B.S., Indiana University, 
1959; D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

Hatfield, Helen, Instructor, Periodontics, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1973; M.Ed., 1977. 

Hawley, Charles E., Professor, Periodontics/Oral 
and Craniofacial Biological Sciences, A.B., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1957; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1962; M.S., University 
of Illinois, 1970; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1976. 

Hayduk, Susan E., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1965; D.M.D., 1969. 

Hendler, Nelson H., Adjunct Clinical Associate 
Professor Volunteer, Oral and Craniofacial Bio- 
logical Sciences, B.A., Princeton University, 
1966; M.D., University of Maryland, 1972; M.S., 
1974. 

Hiatt, James L., Associate Professor, Oral and Cra- 
niofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Ball State 
University, 1959; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1973. 

Hollinger, Jeffrey O., Adjunct Faculty Volunteer, 
Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., 
Hofstra University, 1969; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1973; Ph.D., 1983. 

Hooper, Kenny A., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.A., Morgan State University, 
1969; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Horswell, Bruce B., Assistant Professor, Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, D.D.S., University of 
Minnesota, 1979; M.D., M.S., 1988; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Connecticut, 1991. 

Hupp, James R., Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery, B.S., University of California, 1973; 
D.M.D., Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 
1977; M.D., University of Connecticut, 1982. 



Hyson, John Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1950; M.S., 1959. 

Hyson, John M. Ill, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.S., Loyola College, 1974; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Iglarsh, Z. Annette, Adjunct Clinical Assistant 
Professor Volunteer, Oral and Craniofacial Bio- 
logical Sciences, B.S., City College of New York, 
1970; M.A.T., Alaska Methodist University, 
1971; B.S., Upstate Medical College of Health 
Related Professionals, 1975; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1983. 

Inge, Walter H. Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., James Madison Uni- 
versity, 1977; D.D.S., Medical College of Vir- 
ginia, 1982. 




Jenkins, Thomas Scott, Clinical Instructor, Ortho- 
dontics, B.S., Northwestern University, 1988; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1992. 

Josell, Stuart D., Associate Professor, Orthodon- 
tics/Pediatric Dentistry, D.M.D., Fairleigh Dick- 
inson University, 1974; M.Dent.Sc, University 
of Connecticut, 1979. 

Kassolis, James D., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1973. 

Katz, Nathan, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., Georgetown 
University, 1948. 

Kearns, Mark, Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, 
B.S., Juniata University, 1988; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1992. 

Kelly, William P., Clinical Associate Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.S., Indiana University, 1950; 
D.D.S., 1953; M.A.Ed., The George Washing- 
ton University, 1974- 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY* 67 



Kihn, Francis J., Clinical Professor Volunteer, Pe- 
diatric Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1952; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

Kilian, Jerry A., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Towson State Uni- 
versity, 1974; M.S., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1975; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1981. 

Koch, Douglas J., Clinical Assistant Professor, En- 
dodontics; B.S., Union College, 1983; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1983. 

Koehler, Matthew A., Clinical Instructor Volun- 
teer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., Univer- 
sity of Florida, 1983; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1989. 

Kogan, Stanley, Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1954- 

Kreiner, D. Bartholomew, Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Loyola 
College, 1986; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1989. 




Krywolap, George N., Professor, Oral and Cranio- 
facial Biological Sciences, B.S., Drexel Institute 
of Technology, 1960; M.S., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

Lauttman, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Loyola 
College, 1953; D.D.S. University of Maryland, 
1960. 

Lawyer, Kevin R., Clinical Instructor, Orthodon- 
tics, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1990; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1993. 

Lazzaro, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Periodontics, B.S., Fairleigh Dicken- 
son University, 1968; D.M.D., 1972; M.S., 
Boston University, 1976. 



Lee, Raymond J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1970; D.D.S., 1974. 

Leight, Arlen K., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1977; D.D.S. , University of 
Maryland, 1981. 

Lever, Barry S., Clinical Associate Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954; 
D.D.S., 1958. 

Levinson, Philip D., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1965. 

Levy, Bernard A., Associate Professor, Oral Pa- 
thology, A.B., Ohio University, 1963; D.D.S., 
Western Reserve University, 1966; M.S.D., In- 
diana University, 1969. 

Liggett, Martha L., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
University of Nebraska, 1972; M.S., Columbia 
University, 1975; J.D., Georgetown University, 
1983. 

Litkowski, Leonard J., Associate Professor, Resto- 
rative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1976; M.S., 1983; D.D.S., 1985. 

Long, Ross E. Jr., Clinical Assistant Professor, Or- 
thodontics, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1970; 
D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1974; M.S., 
1978; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 
1979. 

Lyon, Barry D., Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1972; D.D.S., 1976. 

Manski, Richard J., Associate Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., Boston College, 
1976; D.D.S., Howard University, 1980; 
M.B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1985; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1993. 

Manson, Barry, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A./B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1982; D.D.S., 1986. 

Marano, Philip D., Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Loy- 
ola College, 1952; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1956. 

Markin, Philip S., Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Orthodontics, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1963; D.D.S., 1966; M.S., Loyola Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1972. 

Maro, Peter D. Jr., Clinical Instructor, Orthodon- 
tics, B.S., State University of New York at Gene- 



L1ENTAL SCHOOl 



seo, 1987; D.M.D., M.S., University of 
Louisville, 1992. 

Mastella, Stephen, Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 
1982; D.M.D., Temple University, 1986. 

Maurantonio, Erin D., Clinical Instructor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1991. 

McDonald, Neville J., Assistant Professor, En- 
dodontics, B.Sc, University of Otago, New 
Zealand, 1975; B.D.S., 1978; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1987. 

Mecklenburg, Robert E., Clinical Professor Volun- 
teer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University 
of Minnesota, 1955; D.D.S., 1957; M.P.H., Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley, 1963. 

Meeks, Valli, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., Thomas Jefferson 
University, 1977; B.S., Springfield College, 
1981; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1988. 

Meiller, Timothy F., Associate Professor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1970; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1975; M.S., The Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1978, Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1992. 

Meszler, Richard M., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, A.B., New 
York University, 1964; Ph.D., University oi 
Louisville, 1969. 

Miller, Suzan E., Clinical Assistant Professor, Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, B.A., Beloit College, 1974; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Minah, Glenn E., Professor, Oral and Craniofacial 
Biological Sciences/Pediatric Dentistry, A.B., 
Duke University, 1961; D.D.S., University of 
North Carolina, 1966; M.S., University of 
Michigan, 1970; Ph.D., 1976. 

Morgan, Andrea M., Clinical Instructor, Restora- 
tive Dentistry, B.A., University of Michigan, 
1985, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1990, 
M.S., University of Detroit/Mercy School of 
Dentistry, 1992. 

Morganstein, Warren M., Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1966; D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1975. 

Morrison, Grace, Clinical Assistant Professor, Peri- 
odontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1984; 
D.D.S., 1988. 

Mort, Kenneth E., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of 



Maryland, 1967; M.S., University of Missouri, 
1970. 

Myslinski, Norbert R., Associate Professor, Oral 
and Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Cani- 
sius College, 1969; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 
1973. 

Nauman, Robert K., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., Pennsyl- 
vania State University, 1963; M.S., University 
of Massachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Nessif, Richard J., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Marshall 
University, 1973; D.D.S., West Virginia Univer- 
sity, 1979. 

Oates, Stephen, Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1984- 

Olson, Carl R., Associate Professor, Oral and Cra- 
niofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., Harvard 
University, 1966; M.A., Columbia University, 
1967; Ph.D., University- of California at Berke- 
ley, 1979. 

Ord, Robert, Associate Professor, Oral and Max- 
illofacial Surgery, B.D.S., Kings College Hospital 
Dental School, 1970; M.B., B.Ch., Welsh Na- 
tional School of Medicine, 1977. 

Overholser, C. Daniel Jr., Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of 
Notre Dame, 1966; D.D.S., Indiana University, 
1970; M.S.D., 1972. 

Owen, David G., Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, A.B., Syracuse University, 1960; 
D.D.S., McGill University, 1964; A.M., Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1969. 

Palmer, James E., Clinical Instructor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1961. 

Pannebaker, Judith H., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., West 
Virginia University, 1972; B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1981. 

Parente, Frederick, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Volunteer, Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sci- 
ences, B.A., California State University at San 
Diego, 1971; M.A., University of New Mexico, 
1974; Ph.D., 1975. 

Park, Jon K., Associate Professor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., University of 
Missouri, 1964; B.A., Wichita State University, 
1969; M.S., University of Missouri, 1971. 

Park, Sarah K., Clinical Assistant Professor Volun- 
teer, Periodontics, B.A., The Johns Hopkins 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



University, 1978; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1982. 

Parker, Elaine, Associate Professor, Dental Hy- 
giene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1982. 

Parsons, Michael D., Clinical Instructor, En- 
dodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1988; 
D.D.S., 1992. 

Passaro, Peter L., Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Periodontics, D.D.S., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1972. 

Pavlick, Charles T. Jr., Clinical Associate Profes- 
sor, Orthodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1961; D.D.S., 1961; M.S., University of Illinois, 
1966. 

Payne, Thomas M., Dental School Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1968; M.S., 1976; D.D.S., 1978. 

Phillips, Bradley L., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Periodontics, B.S., State University of New York 
at Stony Brook, 1974; D.M.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1976. 




Pick, Karl, Clinical Assistant Professor Volunteer, 
Orthodontics, B.A., University of Michigan, 
1962; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966; 
M.S.D., Fairleigh Dickinson, 1970. 

Plessett, David N., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Periodontics, B.A., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1949; D.D.S., Temple University, 1958. 

Pohlhaus, Steven R., Clinical Instructor Volun- 
teer, Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1989. 

Progebin, Keith, Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Restorative Dentistry, B.S., State Uni- 
versity of New York at Binghampton, 198 V, 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1987. 



70 • DE nt a i m HOOl 



Prymas, Stuart D., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1978. 

Quarantillo, Frederick J., Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Endodontics, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1969; D.D.S., 1973; M.S., George Wash- 
ington University, 1978. 

Raksin, Irving J., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1960; D.D.S., 1964- 

Ranney, Richard R., Professor, Periodontics, 
D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1963; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Rochester, 1969. 

Rauschenberger, Cindy R., Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.A., Augustana College, 1979; 
D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1987; M.S., North- 
western University, 1989. 

Reese, Errol L., Professor, Restorative Dentistry, 
B.S., Fairmount State College, 1960; D.D.S., 
West Virginia University, 1963; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Detroit, 1968. 

Rekow, Marlin F., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Minnesota, 1968; D.D.S., 1970; M.B.A., College 
of St. Thomas, 1978. 

Rethman, Michael P., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Periodontics, D.D.S., Ohio State 
University, 1974; M.S., George Washington 
University, 1982. 

Richter, Henry E. Jr., Associate Professor, Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1954; D.D.S., 1958. 

Robinson, Robert L., Clinical Instructor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S.E.E., Drexel Univer- 
sity, 1972; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1980. 

Robson, M. Leslie, Clinical Instmctor, Periodon- 
tics, B.A., Idaho State University, 1977. 

Romberg, Elaine, Professor, Oral Health Care De- 
livery, B.S., Vassar College, 1960; M.Ed., Lesley 
College, 1963; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1977. 

Rosen, Paul S., Clinical Assistant Professor Volun- 
teer, Periodontics, B.A., Lafayette College, 
1982; D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1986. 

Rubier, Constance G., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic In- 
stitute, 1973; B.S., 1974; M.S., 1975; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1979. 

RuDusky, Bryan M., Clinical Instructor Volun- 
teer, Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of 






Pittsburgh, 1985, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1990. 

Rule, James T., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., 
Temple University, 1953; D.D.S., 1957; M.S., 
University of Chicago, 1960. 

Ruliffson, Franklin R., Clinical Instructor, Resto- 
rative Dentistry, B.A., State University of Iowa, 
1949; D.D.S., 1954; M.A., George Washington 
University, 1980. 

Sachs, Robert I., Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Periodontics/Restorative Dentistry, B.A., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1967; M.S., Pur- 
due University, 1972; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1978. 

Saedi, Simin, Clinical Instructor, Oral Medicine 
and Diagnostic Sciences, D.D.S., School of Den- 
tistry, Tehran University, 1970. 

Samuels, Cheryl T., Associate Professor, Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., Ohio State University, 1967; 
M.S., University of Michigan, 1971, Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1991. 

Sauk, John J., Professor, Oral Pathology, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Detroit, 1963; D.D.S., 1967; M.S., 
University of Minnesota, 1971. 

Scaggs, Gary W., Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1972; 
D.D.S., 1978. 

Schiff, Allen M., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Baltimore, 1975. 

Schlank, Eugene A., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Xavier University, 1978; D.D.S., Ohio State 
University, 1981. 

Schmidt, Keith A., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., Miami Uni- 
versity, 1984; D.D.S., Ohio State University, 
1987. 

Schulz, Earle M., Clinical Associate Professor Vol- 
unteer, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1960; D.D.S., 1962; M.S., University 
of Iowa, 1972. 

Schunick, Howard E., Clinical Associate Profes- 
sor, Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1961; D.D.S., 1962. 

Schwartz, Harry, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1961; D.D.S., 1965. 

Scornavacca, Ronald J., Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor, Orthodontics, B.S., Villanova University, 
1964; D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1968. 



Seibel, Werner, Associate Professor, Oral and Cra- 
niofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., Brooklyn 
College, 1965; MA., Hofstra University, 1968; 
Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University, 
1972. 

Serio, Francis G., Clinical Associate Professor Vol- 
unteer, Periodontics, B.A., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1976; D.M.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1980. 

Sestokas, Anthony, Adjunct Faculty Volunteer, 
Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sciences, 
B.S.C., McMaster University, 1975; M.A., 
University of Western Ontario, 1976; M.A., 
Northeastern University, 1981; Ph.D., 1981. 

Shafinouri, Bruce, Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.A., 
Univensty of Maryland, 1984; D.D.S., 1988. 

Shelton, Preston G., Associate Professor, Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.S., John Carroll University, 1963; 
D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1967; M.S., 
University of Nebraska, 1971. 

Shires, P. Jay, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., University of Richmond, 
1982; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1986. 

Shroff, Bhavna, Assistant Professor, Orthodontics, 
D.D.S., Paris V, 1982; M.Dent.Sc, University of 
Connecticut, 1989. 

Siegel, Michael A., Associate Professor, Oral Medi- 
cine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1975; D.D.S., 1979. 

Siegel, Sharon C, Dental School Assistant Profes- 
sor, Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Western Mary- 
land College, 1975; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1979. 

Siegel, Steven M., Assistant Professor, Orthodon- 
tics, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1976; D.M.D., 
Tufts University, 1980. 

Silverman, Wayne S., Clinical Instructor Volun- 
teer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University 
of Richmond, 1972; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1977. 

Sim, Samuel, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care 
Delivery, B.S., Towson State University, 1979; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Sindler, Arnold, Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Periodontics, B.S., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1966; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1976. 

Slotke, Noel E., Clinical Instructor, Dental Hy- 
giene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; M.S., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1981. 




ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




Smith, Richard J., Clinical Professor Volunteer, 
Orthodontics, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1969; 
M.S., Tufts University, 1973; D.M.D., 1973; M. 
Phil., Yale University, 1978; Ph.D., 1980. 

Stanek, Andrew H., Clinical Instructor, Endodon- 
tics, B.A., Queens College, 1978; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1981. 

Stanford, Hilton G., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.A., University 
of California at Los Angeles, 1950; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1959. 

Stavropoulos, Mary Frances, Clinical Assistant 
Professor Volunteer, Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery, B.S., Medical College of Virginia, 
1973; D.D.S., 1982. 

Stevens, Mark M., Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., St. Louis 
University, 1960. 

Strassler, Howard E., Professor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, B.S., State University of New York at 
Stony Brook, 1971; D.M.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1975. 

Streckfus, Charles, Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1970; M.S., Towson State 
College, 1973; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1978. 

Swanson, Ben Z. Jr., Dental School Associate Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Houston, 1959; D.D.S., University of 
Texas, 1959; M.Phil., University College, Lon- 
don, 1988. 

Sweren, Edgar, Clinical Assistant Professor, Ortho- 
dontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Switzer, Victoria, Clinical Instructor, Orthodon- 
tics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1977; B.S., 
L985;D.D.S., 1992. 

Sydiskis, Robert J., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., Univer- 
sity of Bridgeport, 1961; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University, 1965. 

Tate, Don L., Clinical Instructor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1975; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1983. 

Tewes, Ligouri, Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1981. 

Tewes, Warren D., Dental School Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Ran- 
dolph Macon College, 1971; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1975; M.S., 1982. 



Thompson, Van P., Professor, Restorative Den- 
tistry, B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
1966; Ph.D., 1971; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1979. 

Thut, Paul D., Professor, Oral and Craniofacial Bi- 
ological Sciences, A.B., Hamilton College, 
1965; M.S., University of Rhode Island, 1968; 
Ph.D., Dartmouth College, 1971. 

Tilghman, Donald M., Professor, Oral and Max- 
illofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1958; D.D.S., 1961. 

Trail, Leo V., Clinical Assistant Professor, Oral 
Health Care Delivery/Periodontics, B.S., Mt. St. 
Mary's College, 1975; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1979. 

Urbaitis, Barbara K., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.A., Hunter 
College, 1963; M.S., 1965; Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1968. 

Vail, Arthur E., Clinical Instructor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.A., University of Maryland, 1981; 
D.D.S., 1983. 

VandenBosche, Raoul C, Clinical Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Restorative Dentistry, A.B., College of 
the Holy Cross, 1962; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966. 

Vandermer, Jack D., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences/General 
Practice Residency, B.S., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1963; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1967; M.Ed., 1973. 

Varma, Shambu D., Research Professor Volunteer, 
Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., 
University of Allahabad, India, 1955; M.S., 
1957; Ph.D., University of Rajasthan, India, 
1964. 

Vera, Anny B., Clinical Assistant Professor Volun- 
teer, Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Colegio Maria 
Montessori, 1971; D.D.S., Central University of 
Venezuela, 1976, M.S., University of Maryland, 
1989. 

Vu, Anh Q., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, Resto- 
rative Dentistry, D.D.S., Georgetown Univer- 
sity, 1986. 

Wagner, Mark L., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, 
A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1959; 
D.M.D., University of Alabama, 1963. 

Watson, Maria R., Clinical Assistant Professor 
Volunteer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.D., 
Bachiller en Odontologia, 1985; D.D.S., Ciru- 



72 • D E N T A L SCHOOI 



jano Dentista, 1985; M.P.H., University of 
Michigan, 1989; M.S.P., 1989. 

Waxman, Burton M., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Endodontics, B.A., Clark University, 1973; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Wealcatch, Samuel A., Clinical Instructor Volun- 
teer, Restorative Dentistry, B.S., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1985; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1990. 

Weiner, Stephen A., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 1969. 

Weisberg, Alan S., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Orthodontics, D.D.S., Georgetown University, 
1955. 

Welch, R. Dale, Clinical Assistant Professor Vol- 
unteer, Periodontics, B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1969; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1975. 

Whitaker, George C., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Earlham College, 
1970; D.D.S., Howard University, 1974; M.S.D., 
Indiana University, 1977. 

Williams, George C., Dental School Associate 
Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Washington College, 1971; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1978. 

Williams, George H. Ill, Dental School Associate 
Professor, Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sci- 
ences/General Practice Residency, B.S., Tuscu- 
lum College, 1962; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1966. 

Williams, Henry N., Associate Professor, Oral and 
Craniofacial Biological Sciences, B.S., North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Uni- 
versity, 1964; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1972; Ph.D., 1979. 

Williams, Lisa T., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1978; D.D.S., 1988. 

Williams, Robert E., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Orthodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1966; D.M.D., 1969; M.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1982. 

Wilson, Margaret B., Dental School Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., David 
Lipscomb College, 1977; D.D.S., Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, 1981; M.B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1990. 



Winson, Dennis E., Clinical Associate Professor, 
Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1961; D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1965. 

Witting, Fedra, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., University of Maryland, 
1986; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1990. 

Wood, Gregory A., Clinical Instructor Volunteer, 
Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., Marquette 
University, 1971. 

Wood, Morton, Associate Professor, Restorative 
Dentistry, B.A., American International Col- 
lege, 1965; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1969; M.Ed., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1979. 

Wynn, Richard L., Professor, Oral and Craniofa- 
cial Biological Sciences, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1964; M.S., 1966; Ph.D., 1970. 

Yellowitz, Janet, Assistant Professor, Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., Columbia University, 1972; 
M.P.H., University of Minnesota, 1979; D.M.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1987. 

Zeller, Gregory G., Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1975; M.S., 1983. 

Zeren, Karl J., Clinical Assistant Professor Volun- 
teer, Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1969; D.D.S., 1975. 

Zupnik, Robert M., Clinical Professor, Periodon- 
tics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1958; M.S.D., Boston 
University, 1964- 

Associate Staff 

Allen, Sandy, Director, Central Materials Services, 
B.S., University of Baltimore, 1984- 

Baier, Richard G., Central Dental Laboratory Ser- 
vices, A.A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1976. 

Copelan, Nancy, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1988. 

Court, Lisa, Director of Development, B.A., State 
University of New York at Oswego, 1983. 

Dempsey, Deanne, A. A., New York State Regents, 
1986. 

Garner, Wilhelma M., Director of Student Support 
Services, B.A., Fisk University, 1966; M.Ed., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Gilner, M. Patricia, Oral Pathology, B.S., College 
of Notre Dame of Maryland, 1970; M.Ed., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1980; M.S., Loyola 
College, 1985. 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY* 73 



Gipe, David, Orthodontics, B.A., Towson State 
University, 1976; M.A., Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity, 1981. 

Groves, Keith, Oral and Craniofacial Biological 
Sciences. 

Hebert, Carla, Oral Pathology, B.S., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1986. 

Kaur, Manjit, Oral and Craniofacial Biological Sci- 
ences, B.S., Jai Hind College, India, 1985; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1990. 

Kelly, Jacqueline, Oral and Craniofacial Biological 
Sciences, B.S., Towson State University, 1989. 

King, William F. Jr., Central Dental Laboratory 
Services, A. A., Community College of Balti- 
more, 1971. 

Land, Myra R., Director of Academic Support Ser- 
vices, A.B., Goucher College, 1956. 

Lawson, Harvey W., Orthodontics, A.A., Com- 
munity College of Baltimore, 1985. 

McCleary, Leslie, Oral and Craniofacial Biological 
Sciences, B.A., University of Maryland, 1992. 

Organ, Robert J., Oral and Craniofacial Biological 
Sciences. 

Suls, Frederick J., Central Dental Laboratory Ser- 
vices, A.A., Community College of Baltimore, 
1972. 

Williams, Deloris, Special Events Coordinator. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT 
BALTIMORE 

David J. Ramsay, D.M., D. Phil., President 

Cheryl T. Samuels, Ph.D., Acting Vice President, 

Academic Affairs 
James T. Hill Jr., M.P.A., Vice President, Administra- 
tive Services 
T. Sue Gladhill, M.S.W., Vice President, Govern- 
mental Affairs 
Fred Brooke Lee, Vice President, Institutional Ad- 
vancement 
Morton I. Rapoport, M.D., President and Chief Exec- 
utive Officer, University of Maryland Medical 
System 
Richard R. Ranney, D.D.S., M.S., Dean, Dental 

School 
Joann A. Boughman, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate School 
Donald G. Gifford, J.D., Dean, School of Law 
Donald E. Wilson, M.D., Dean, School of Medicine 
Barbara R. Heller, Ed.D., Dean, School ofhlursing 
David A. Knapp, Ph.D., Dean, School of Pharmacy 
Jesse J. Harris, D.S.W., Dean, School of Social Work 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SYSTEM 

Board of Regents 

Margaret Alton 

The Honorable Mary Arabian 

Richard O Berndt 

Roger Blunt 

The Honorable Benjamin L. Brown 

Earle Palmer Brown 

Charles W.Cole Jr. 

Frank A. Gunther Jr. 

Ilona M. Hogan 

Ann Hull 

Henry R. Lord 

George V. McGowan 

Franklin P. Perdue 

Lewis R. Riley 

Constance M. Unseld 

Albert N. Whiting, Ph.D. 

Central Administration 

Donald N. Langenberg, Ph.D., Chancellor of the 

University 
George L. Marx, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor, Academic 

Affairs 
John K. Martin, Vice Chancellor, Advancement 
Donald L. Myers, M.B.A., Vice Chancellor, General 

Administration 



74 • DENTAL SCHOOL 



Alumni Association 



The Alumni Association is independently incorpo- 
rated and is recognized by the Board of Regents of 
the University of Maryland System. With head- 
quarters in Hayden- Harris Hall and five chartered 
sections, it represents almost 6,000 graduates and is 
actively interested in the organizational structure of 
the school. 

The annual meeting is held during Alumni 
Week. Each year alumni receptions are held 
throughout the country, and officers of the associa- 
tion participate whenever possible. In addition, so- 
cial affairs are held at the Dental School for the stu- 
dents and alumni. 

Yearly the association honors one of the alumni 
by bestowing its highest award, the Distinguished 
Alumnus Award. 




Officers 



President 

Dr. Stanley E. Block '58 
930 Astern Way, #201 
Annapolis, Maryland 21401 



Treasurer 

Dr. George H. Williams III '66 
12116 J erusalem Road 
Kingsville, Maryland 21087 



President Elect 
Dr. Frank J. Romeo '66 
6305 Belair Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21206 



Editor 

Dr. John F. Patterson 

21 West Road 

Towson, Maryland 21204 



First Vice President 
Dr. Ronald M. Reichart 
13816 Manor Glen Road 
Baldwin, Maryland 21013 



Historian' Archivist 
Dr. Gardner P.H. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 



Second Vice President 
Dr. Harold L. Crossley '80 
10630 Partridge Lane 
Cockeysville, Maryland 21030 



Past President 
Dr. Frank A. Dolle, '59 
1213 Dulaney Valley Road 
Towson, Maryland 2 1 204 



Executive Director 
Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 
6810 North Charles Street 
Towson, Maryland 21204 

Secretary 

Dr. Richard M. Hemphill '58 

Box 725 

Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 



ASSOCIATION .75 



Policy Statements 




EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore is actively 
committed to providing equal educational and em- 
ployment opportunity in all of its programs. It is the 
goal of the university to assure that women and mi- 
norities are equitably represented among the fac- 
ultv. staff and administration oi the university, so 
that its work force reflects the diversity of Mary- 
land's population. 

All employment policies and activities of the 
Universitv of Maryland at Baltimore shall be consis- 
tent with federal and state laws, regulations and ex- 
ecutive orders on nondiscrimination on the basis of 
race, color, religion, age, ancestry or national origin, 
sex, sexual orientation, handicap, marital status and 
veteran status. Sexual harassment, as a form of sex 
discrimination, is prohibited among the work force 
of the university. 

UMAB POLICY CONCERNING 
PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF 
STUDENT AND EMPLOYEE INFECTION 
WITH BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS 

The Dental School fully subscribes to the Univer- 
sity oi Maryland at Baltimore Policy Concerning 
Prevention and Management of Student and Em- 
ployee Infection with Bloodbome Pathogens, 
which became effective July 1, 1994. All enrolled 
students receive a copy of this policy statement as 
part of their matriculation documents. Individuals 
seriously considering applying to any of the Dental 
School's programs should request a copy of the pol- 
icy from the office of admissions and student affairs. 

Section 6, Admissions and Hiring Practices, of 
the policy statement states: "Inquiries about infec- 
tion with HBV, HCV, or HIV will not be made of 
prospective UMAB Personnel. Neither admission 
n< »r employment will be denied any otherwise quali- 
fied individual on the basis of infection with Blood- 
borne Pathogens. However, limitations on the 
training and profession.il activities which may result 
from infection with Bloodbome Pathogens will be 
communicated to prospective students and employ- 
ees." (See Next section.) 

Section 7, Advice on Risks and Limitations, 
states: ". . . Applicant- who are infected with Blood- 
bome Pathogens are not required to identify them- 
selves to UMAB. Advice to applicants will be pro- 
vided in a general form available to all applicants. If 



infection with a specific Bloodbome Pathogen (e.g., 
HBV) could prevent a person from completing the 
curriculum or subsequently practicing the intended 
profession as a result of scientifically established 
contagion risk, this information will be included in 
the general information which the school distrib- 
utes to applicants." Although information concern- 
ing applicants' status regarding bloodbome 
pathogens is not a part of the admissions process, 
status of infection could adversely impact individu- 
als' ability to complete their education or their abil- 
ity to obtain future professional licensure. Appli- 
cants are specifically advised that the Dental 
School does not admit individuals who have had 
prior infection with the Hepatitis B virus or Hepati- 
tis C virus which has left them positive for the sur- 
face antigen of the virus. These individuals must 
consider alternative career pathways. 

All candidates for enrollment are strongly en- 
couraged to know their status and to seek profes- 
sional advice if they have questions. The dean oi 
the Dental School has appointed an ombudsman or 
advocate to whom any applicant, student or em- 
ployee can go in confidence for advice on policies 
and procedures related to infection with bloodbome 
pathogens and on the implications of testing and 
disclosure for enrollment or employment status. In- 
dividuals with specific questions or concerns are 
urged to seek advice from the Dental School's om- 
budsman. 

Section 9, Immunizations Against HBV, states: 
"Students enrolling in academic programs that will 
involve participating in invasive or exposure-prone 
procedures must be vaccinated against HBV at their 
own expense. Students may be vaccinated at Stu- 
dent and Employee Health. Those who were immu- 
nized prior to enrollment must provide evidence of 
immunization to the enrolling school." 

Doctor of Dental Surgery and Bachelor of Science in 
Dental Hygiene Applicants 

Although students are strongly encouraged to com- 
plete the three-shot Hepatitis B immunization se- 
ries prior to matriculation, entering students who 
have not been appropriately immunized against 
HBV will receive their first vaccination during 
Dental School orientation through Student and 
Employee Health. The second and third vaccina- 
tions will occur at one-month and six-month inter- 
vals, respectively. Students may not participate in 
clinical or other activities in which they may be 
placed at occupational risk until at least one month 



I SCHOOL 



after the second in the series of HBV immuniza- 
tions. Failure to complete the series in a timely 
manner could result in delayed progress through the 
curriculum or dismissal from enrollment. 

Advanced Dental Education Applicants 
It is anticipated that most applicants for Advanced 
Dental Education programs will have received the 
full three-shot series of HBV immunizations as pre- 
doctoral students. For those individuals who have 
not completed the HBV immunization series, Den- 
tal School policy requires that all Advanced Dental 
Education applicants considering enrollment 
should begin the three-shot HBV immunization se- 
ries no later than May 1 of the year of matricula- 
tion. As a condition of enrollment, students must 
provide documentation that they received the first 
in the series no later than May 1 and the second no 
later than June 1. Those individuals may receive 
their third immunization through Student and Em- 
ployee Health at the appropriate time after enroll- 
ment at the Dental School. 

FACULTY, STUDENT AND 
INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ACADEMIC 
INTEGRITY 

Preamble 

The academic enterprise is characterized by rea- 
soned discussion between student and teacher, a 
mutual respect for the learning and teaching 
process, and intellectual honesty in the pursuit of 
new knowledge. By tradition, students and teachers 
have certain rights and responsibilities which they 
bring to the academic community. While the fol- 
lowing statements do not imply a contract between 
the teacher or the institution and the student, they 
are nevertheless conventions which should be cen- 
tral to the learning and teaching process. 

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Faculty members shall share with students and 
administrators the responsibility for academic in- 
tegrity. 

2. Faculty members shall enjoy freedom in the 
classroom to discuss subject matter reasonably 
related to the course. In turn they have the re- 
sponsibility to encourage free and honest inquiry 
and expression on the part of students. 



3. Faculty members, consistent with the principles 
of academic freedom, have the responsibility to 
present courses that are consistent with their de- 
scriptions in the catalog of the institution. In ad- 
dition, faculty members have the obligation to 
make students aware of the expectations in the 
course, the evaluation procedures and the grad- 
ing policy. 

4. Faculty members are obligated to evaluate stu- 
dents fairly and equitably and in a manner ap- 
propriate to the course and its objectives. Grades 
shall be assigned without prejudice or bias. 

5. Faculty members shall make all reasonable ef- 
forts to prevent the occurrence of academic dis- 
honesty through appropriate design and admin- 
istration of assignments and examinations, 
careful safeguarding of course materials and ex- 
aminations, and regular reassessment of evalua- 
tion procedures. 

6. When instances of academic dishonesty are sus- 
pected, faculty members shall have the responsi- 
bility to see that appropriate action is taken in 
accordance with institutional regulations. 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Students share with faculty and administrators 
the responsibility for academic integrity. 

2. Students shall have the right of free and honest 
inquiry and expression in their courses. In addi- 
tion, students shall have the right to know the 
requirements of their courses and to know the 
manner in which they will be evaluated and 
graded. 

3. Students shall have the obligation to complete 
the requirements of their courses in the time and 
manner prescribed and to submit to evaluation 
of their work. 

4- Students shall have the right to be evaluated 
fairly, equitably and in a timely manner appro- 
priate to the course and its objectives. 

5. Students shall not submit as their own work any 
work which has been prepared by others. Out- 
side assistance in the preparation of this work, 
such as librarian assistance, tutorial assistance, 
typing assistance, or such special assistance as 
may be specified or approved by the appropriate 
faculty members, is allowed. 

6. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to pre- 
vent the occurrence of academic dishonesty. 
They shall by their own example encourage aca- 
demic integrity and shall themselves refrain from 




POLICY STATEMENTS. 77 




acts of cheating and plagiarism or other acts of 
academic dishonesty. 
7. When instances of academic dishonesty are sus- 
pected, students shall have the right and respon- 
sibility to bring this to the attention of the fac- 
ulty or other appropriate authority. 

Institutioiud Responsibility 

1. Constituent institutions of the University of 
Maryland System shall take appropriate measures 
to foster academic integrity in the classroom. 

2. Each institution shall take steps to define acts of 
academic dishonesty, to insure procedures for 
due process for students accused or suspected of 
acts of academic dishonesty, and to impose ap- 
propriate sanctions on students found to be 
guilty of acts of academic dishonesty. 

3. Students expelled or suspended for reasons of 
academic dishonesty by any institution in the 
University of Maryland System shall not be ad- 
mitted to any other System institution during 
the period of expulsion or suspension. 

Approved, November 30, J 989 by the Board of Regents 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF 
STUDENT RECORDS 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore to adhere to the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). As 
such, it is the policy of the university (1) to permit 
students to inspect their education records, (2) to 
limit disclosure to others of personally identifiable 
information from education records without stu- 
dents' prior written consent and (3) to provide stu- 
dents the opportunity to seek correction of their 
education records where appropriate. Each school 
shall develop policies to ensure that this policy is 
implemented. 

SCHEDULING OF ACADEMIC 
ASSIGNMENTS ON DATES OF RELIGIOUS 
OBSERVANCE 



vidual participation in religious observances. Op- 
portunities to make up missed academic assign- 
ments shall be timely and shall not interfere with 
the regular academic assignments of the student. 
Each school/academic unit shall adopt procedures 
to ensure implementation of this policy. 

ELIGIBILITY TO REGISTER AT UMAB 

A student may register at UMAB when the follow- 
ing conditions are met: ( 1 ) the student is accepted 
to UMAB, (2) the student has received approval 
from the unit academic administrator and (3) the 
student has demonstrated academic and financial 
eligibility. 

REVIEW OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND 
CAPRICIOUS GRADING 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore that students be provided a mechanism to 
review course grades that are alleged to be arbitrary 
or capricious. Each school/academic unit shall de- 
velop guidelines and procedures to provide a means 
for a student to seek review of course grades. These 
guidelines and procedures shall be published regu- 
larly in the appropriate media so that all faculty and 
students are informed about this policy. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
POSITION ON ACTS OF VIOLENCE AND 
EXTREMISM WHICH ARE RACIALLY, 
ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY OR 
POLITICALLY MOTIVATED. 

The Board of Regents strongly condemns criminal 
acts of destruction or violence against the person or 
property of others. Individuals committing such acts 
at any campus or facility of the university will be 
subject to swift campus judicial and personnel ac- 
tion, including possible expulsion or termination, as 
well as possible state criminal proceedings. 



It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore to excuse the absence(s) of students that re- 
sult from the observance of religious holidays. Stu- 
dents shall be given the opportunity, whenever 
feasible, to make up, within a reasonable tune, any 
academic assignments that are missed due to indi- 



( HOOL 



SERVICE TO THOSE WITH INFECTIOUS 
DISEASES 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Bal- 
timore to provide education and training to stu- 
dents for the purpose of providing care and service 
to all persons. The institution will employ appropri- 
ate precautions to protect providers in a manner 
meeting the patients' or clients' requirements, yet 
protecting the interest of students and faculty par- 
ticipating in the provision of such care or service. 

No student will he permitted to refuse to provide 
care or service to any assigned person in the absence 
of special circumstances placing the student at in- 
creased risk for an infectious disease. Any student 
who refuses to treat or serve an assigned person 
without prior consent of the school involved will be 
subject to penalties under appropriate academic 
procedures, such penalties to include suspension or 
dismissal. 



HUMAN RELATIONS CODE 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore has a 
Human Relations Code for use by the entire cam- 
pus community. The code represents UMAB's com- 
mitment to human relations issues. The specific 
purposes of the code include: 

1. Prevention or elimination of unlawful discrimi- 
nation on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, sex- 
ual orientation, marital status, age, ancestry or 
national origin, physical or mental handicap, or 
exercise of rights secured by the First Amend- 
ment of the U.S. Constitution; and 

2. Establishing a timely, effective grievance proce- 
dure as an alternative to more lengthy formal 
processes for resolution of human relations issues. 
A Human Relations Committee was created to 

oversee the code. It is comprised of campus faculty, 
administrators and students and is advisory to the 
president of the campus. The committee may insti- 
tute educational programs and provide an open 
forum on human relations issues. In addition, the 
committee is charged with maintaining a media- 
tion, investigation and hearing process for specific 
complaints of discrimination brought by students, 
faculty or staff. The code describes the particulars of 
the hearing process. It is the intent of the code to 
provide a grievance procedure for any individual on 
campus who wants a cross-section of the campus 
community to investigate and mediate a problem 



without having to resort to complaints to external 
agencies such as the Maryland Commission on 
Human Relations, complaints under personnel rules 
or lawsuits. 

Copies of the Human Relations Code are avail- 
able in the dean's office, the student affairs and 
USGA offices in the Baltimore Student Union, and 
the human resources management and affirmative 
action offices in the administration building. 

No provision of this publication shall be construed as a 
contract between any applicant or student and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore. The university re- 
serves the right to change any admission or advancement 
requirement at any time. The university further reserves 
the right to ask a student to withdraw at any time when 
it is considered to be in the best interest of the university. 




POLICY STATEMENTS -79 



Maps 



The University of Maryland at Baltimore is located 
in downtown Baltimore, six blocks west of the 
Inner Harbor and two blocks north of Oriole Park 
at Camden Yards in the UniversityCenter district. 

DIRECTIONS 

From 1-95: Take Rte. 395 (downtown Baltimore) 
and exit onto Martin Luther King Jr., Blvd., staying 
in right lane. At fourth traffic light, turn right onto 
Baltimore St. Turn left at second traffic light onto 
Paca Street (get into right lane) and enter the Balti- 
more Grand Garage (on your right). 

Bus Access 

MTA buses numbered 1, 2, 7, 8, 11, 20, 35 and 36 
all stop in the campus area. 

Subway Access 

The Baltimore Metro runs from Charles Center to 
Owings Mills. Stops closest to campus are at Lex- 
ington Market and Charles Center. 

Light Rail 

A new Light Rail system connects northern Balti- 
more County and Glen Burnie. The University- 
Center stop is at Howard and Baltimore Streets. 




Francis Scotl 
Key Bridge 



• I I I N I A I S ( 1 1 I i I I I 



UniversityCenter Area, University of Maryland at Baltimore 



™ I ■ """ «« hmk| SARATOGA 

A'lB.fl 




Academic and 
Patient Care Facilities 

19 Administration Building 
737 West Lombard Street 



13 Athletic Center 

646 West Pratt Street 
12 Baltimore Student Union 

621 West Lombard Street 
37 Biomedical Research 

Building 
" 1 North Greene Street 

(Walter P.) Carter Center 

630 West Fayette Street 

Davidge Hall 

522 West Lombard Street 

Dental School 

666 West Baltimore Strret 
22 Dunning Hall 

636 West Lombard Street 

East Hall 

520 West Lombard Street 
20 Environmental Health and 

Safety Building 

714 West Lombard Street 
1 James T. Frenkil Building 

16 South Eutaw Street 
6 Greene Street Building 

29 South Greene Street 

28 Health Sciences Facility 
685 West Baltimore Street 

10 Health Sciences Library 

South Greene Street 
42 Hope Lodge 

636 West Lexington Street 
26 Howard Hall 

660 West Redwood Street 
36 Information Services 

Building 

100 North Greene Street 
33 Law School and Marshall 

Law Library 

500 West Baltimore Street 
9 Lombard Building 

511 West Lombard Street 
35 Maryland Bar Center 

520 West Fayette Street 

Medical Biotechnology 

Center 

721 West Lombard Street 

Medical School 

Frank C. Bressler Research 

Building 

655 West Baltimore Street 

29 Medical School Teaching 
Facility 
10 South Pine Street 



24 Parsons Hall 

622 West Lombard Street 

40 PascaultRow 
651-655 West Lexington 
Street 

30 Pharmacy School 
20 North Pine Street 

41 Pine Street Police Station 
214 North Pine Street 



39 Ronald McDonald House 

635 West Lexington Street 
5 Social Work School 

525 West Redwood Street 
14 State Medical Examiner's 

Building 

1 1 1 Penn Street 
4 University Plaza 

Redwood and Greene Streets 
21 Western Health Center 

700 West Lombard Street 
23 Whitehurst Hall 

624 West Lombard Street 

2 405 West Redwood Street 
Building 

16 701 West Pratt Street 

Building 
1 1 University Health Center 

120 South Greene Street 
25 University of Maryland 

Medical System 

22 South Greene Street 

3 University of Maryland 
Professional Building 
419 West Redwood Street 

32 Veterans Affairs Medical 
Center 

Baltimore and Greene 
Streets 

Cultural and 
Civic Facilities 

46 Babe Ruth Birthplace- 
Baltimore Orioles Museum 

48 Dr. Samuel D. Harris 
National Museum of 
Dentistry (opening 1996) 

44 Lexington Market 

43 Market Center Post Office 

47 Old Saint Paul's Cemetery 

45 Oriole Park at Camden Yards 
34 Westminister Hall 

Parking Facilities 

VP Baltimore Grand Garage 

(visitors) 
DP Dental Patient Parking Lot 

(dental patients) 
SP Lexington Garage (students) 
PP University Plaza Garage 

(patients and patient 

transporters) 
P Public Parking Facilities 

Assigned University 
Parking 

A Koester's Lots 

B Pearl Garage/Parking Office 

C Penn Street Garage 

(opening 1994) 
D Pratt Street Garage 
E Other assigned parking 

areas 



Parking 03 Dental Patient Parking QJ Patient Parking (jQ Student Parking [Q Parking Offi 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act Request 

The Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (Public Law 101-542), signed into federal law November 8, 1990, 
requires that the University of Maryland at Baltimore make readily available to its students and prospective students the 
information listed below. 

Should you wish to obtain any of this information, please check the appropriate space(s), fill in your name, mailing address 
and UMAB school name, tear off this form and send it to: 

University Office of Student Affairs 
Attn: Student Right-to-Know Request 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 
Suite 336. Baltimore Student Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore. MD 21201-1575 



Complete and return this portion 



Financial Aid 

Costs of Attending the University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Refund Policy 

Facilities and Services for Handicapped 

Procedures for Review of School and Campus Accreditation 

Completion/Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students 

Loan Deferral under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer Sen ices V I 

Campus Safety and Security 

Campus Crime Statistics 



UMAB School and Program 



L. 



J 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Academic Calendar 



Dental/Dental Hygiene 

1994-95 

August 22-23 

Freshman orientation 
August 24 

First semester begins — dentistry 
September 5 

Labor Day (school closed) 
September 6 

First semester begins — dental hygiene 
November 24-25 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 16-23 

Exam week 
December 26-January 2, 1995 

Christmas recess 
January 3-20 

Minimester 
January 16 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (school closed) 
January 23 

Second semester begins 
March 13-17 

Spring vacation 
May 12-18 

Exam week 
May 19 

Commencement 



1995-96 

August 21-22 

Freshman orientation 
August 23 

First semester begins — dentistry 
September 4 

Labor Day (school closed) 
September 5 

First semester begins — dental hygiene 
November 23-24 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 15-22 

Exam week 
December 23-January 3, 1994 

Christmas recess 
January 2-19 

Minimester 
January 15 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (school closed) 
January 29 

Second semester begins 
March 18-23 

Spring vacation 
May 17-23 

Exam week 
May 24 

Commencement 



Advanced Dental Education 

1994-95 

July 5 

Registration 
July 8 

First semester begins 
September 5 

Labor Day (school closed) 
November 24-25 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 26-January 2, 1995 

Christmas recess 
January 16 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (school closed) 
January 23 

Second semester begins 
March 15-17 

Spring vacation 
May 19 

Commencement 
May 29 

Memorial Day (school closed) 
June 30 

Last day of classes 



1995-96 

July 3 

Registration 
July 7 

First semester begins 
September 4 

Labor Day (school closed) 
November 23-24 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 26-January 1, 1996 

Christmas recess 
January 15 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (school closed) 
January 29 

Second semester begins 
March 18-23 

Spring vacation 
May 24 

Commencement 
May 27 

Memorial Day (school closed) 
June 28 

Last day of classes 



These schedules are subject to change , and are provided 
only for general information concerning the length of 
terms and holidays.